Browsing articles in "World News"

Preview: Trump To Address United Nations About America’s Role

Sep 19, 2017   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on Preview: Trump To Address United Nations About America’s Role

President Trump is expected to explain what “America First” means to the United Nations General Assembly, an organization known for putting the world first. Trump speaks to its member nations Tuesday.

California’s Legislature Votes To Move Primary Elections To March

Sep 19, 2017   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on California’s Legislature Votes To Move Primary Elections To March

California could get a head start in selecting the nominees for president in 2020. A measure passed by the state Legislature would move primary elections from June to March.

Trump Wants U.S. Delegation To The U.N. To Be More Cost Efficient

Sep 18, 2017   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on Trump Wants U.S. Delegation To The U.N. To Be More Cost Efficient

President Trump makes his United Nations debut this week and he’s making a big push to cut the U.N.’s budget. The State Department plans to have a smaller footprint as part of this effort.

Emmy Awards: ‘Handmaid’s Tale’ And ‘Veep’ Win In Multiple Categories

Sep 18, 2017   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on Emmy Awards: ‘Handmaid’s Tale’ And ‘Veep’ Win In Multiple Categories

Stephen Colbert hosted the 69th Emmy Awards Sunday night in Los Angeles. The Handmaid’s Tale won the Emmy for drama series. Veep and Atlanta split the major comedy categories.

Dolores Huerta: The Civil Rights Icon Who Showed Farmworkers ‘Si Se Puede’

Sep 17, 2017   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on Dolores Huerta: The Civil Rights Icon Who Showed Farmworkers ‘Si Se Puede’

United Farm Workers leader Dolores Huerta at the Delano grape workers strike in Delano, Calif., 1966. The strike set in motion the modern farmworkers movement.

Jon Lewis/Courtesy of LeRoy Chatfield


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United Farm Workers leader Dolores Huerta at the Delano grape workers strike in Delano, Calif., 1966. The strike set in motion the modern farmworkers movement.

Jon Lewis/Courtesy of LeRoy Chatfield

At 87, Dolores Huerta is a living civil rights icon. She has spent most of her life as a political activist, fighting for better working conditions for farmworkers and the rights of the downtrodden, a firm believer in the power of political organizing to effect change.

And yet, her role in the farmworkers movement has long been overshadowed by that of Cesar Chavez, her longtime collaborator and co-founder of what became the United Farm Workers of America union. That’s true even when it comes to credit for coining the movement’s famous slogan, Si se puede — Spanish for “Yes, we can” — which inspired President Obama’s own campaign battle cry and has often wrongly been attributed to Chavez. (Obama acknowledged Huerta as the source of that phrase when he awarded her the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2012. She talks about its origins below.)

Dolores, a new documentary from director Peter Bratt, aims to finally set the record straight. The film chronicles Huerta’s evolution from a teenager outraged by the racial and economic injustices she saw in California’s agricultural Central Valley to a key architect of the nationwide boycott of grapes that led to the first farmworker union contracts. At its height, an estimated 17 million people stopped buying grapes.

Huerta was 25 when she became the political director of the Community Service Organization, run by legendary community organizer Fred Ross. That’s where she met Chavez, and in 1962 the two teamed up to form what became the UFA, organizing farmworkers who toiled for wages as low as 70 cents an hour, in brutal conditions.

“They didn’t have toilets in the fields, they didn’t have cold drinking water. They didn’t have rest periods,” Huerta tells NPR.

In 1965, the grape workers struck, and Huerta was a leading organizer. She faced violence on the picket lines — and sexism from both the growers she was staring down and their political allies, and from within her own organization. At one point, a lawmaker is seen referring to Huerta as Chavez’s “sidekick.” At a time when the feminist movement was taking root, Huerta was an unconventional figure: the twice-divorced mother of 11 children. “Who supports those kids when she’s out on these adventures?” one of her opponents is shown asking in historical footage.

Now grown, her children provide some of the most moving accounts in the film. They speak with great admiration for their mother, but are also candid about the price her tireless dedication to the cause exacted on the family. As one daughter puts it, “The movement became her most important child.”

Huerta organizes marchers in Coachella, Calif., in 1969. She’s been an outspoken activist for the rights of farmworkers and the downtrodden for much of her life.

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Huerta organizes marchers in Coachella, Calif., in 1969. She’s been an outspoken activist for the rights of farmworkers and the downtrodden for much of her life.

George Ballis//George Ballis/Take Stock/The Image Work

As she approaches nine decades of life, Huerta remains outspoken and indefatigable. Through her Dolores Huerta Foundation, she continues to work with agricultural communities, organizing people to run for office and advocating on issues of health, education and economic development.

Huerta recently stopped by NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., where she spoke to us about the new film, her life’s work and her ongoing activism. Excerpts of our conversation are transcribed below, edited for brevity and clarity.

After the grape workers went on strike, you directed the national boycott of grapes. What kind of day-to-day conditions did farmworkers in the field face at that time?

Well, the conditions were terrible. The farmworkers were only earning about 70 cents an hour at that time — 90 cents was the highest wage that they were earning. They didn’t have toilets in the fields, they didn’t have cold drinking water. They didn’t have rest periods. People worked from sunup to sundown. It was really atrocious. And families were so poor. I think that’s one of the things that really infuriated me. When I saw people in their homes — they had dirt floors. And the furniture was orange crates and cardboard boxes. People were so incredibly poor and they were working so hard. And the children were [suffering from malnutrition] and very ill-clothed and ill-fed. I said, “This is wrong,” because you saw how hard they were working, and yet they were not getting paid anything.

One thing that struck me while watching the documentary was the violence directed against farmworkers during the strike. Were you subjected to this violence?

Oh, many times. We had violence directed at us by the growers themselves, trying to run us down by cars, pointing rifles at us, spraying the people when they were on the picket line with sulfur. And then we had violence by the Teamsters union with the goons that they hired at that time — and by the way, I have to say that the Teamsters union are OK today. [Editor’s note: In 1970, the Teamsters union signed a deal with growers for access to organize farmworkers, undercutting the efforts of the United Farm Workers.] They came at us with two by fours. We had a lot of violence, definitely. And then I was beaten up by the police San Francisco [in 1988], which also is shown in the film. [During that incident, several of her ribs were broken and her recovery took months.]

In the documentary, we hear a lot of moving testimony from your children. And they obviously have a great deal of respect and admiration for you. But they also talk about the toll that the work took on the family when they were growing up. Was that something that weighed on you — the fact that that you were very much a pioneer, but the time that you spent on activism meant time away from your children?

I think that’s something that all mothers have to deal with, especially single mothers. We work and we have to leave the kids behind. And I think that’s one of the reasons that we, not only as women but as families, we have to advocate for early childhood education for all of our children. To make sure that they’re taken care of but also educated in the process. Because we do need women in civic life. We do need women to run for office, to be in political office. We need a feminist to be at the table when decisions are being made so that the right decisions will be made. But you know, actually, in the farmworkers union — and the film doesn’t really show this — we always had a daycare for children. Because when we did this strike, and especially when all of the people went on the march to Sacramento, the women had to take over the picket lines.

Because the men were marching to Sacramento?

Yeah, the women had to take over the strike. The women had to run all the picket lines. They had to do all the work that we were doing in the strike.

Do you feel that women working in the fields faced special challenges when you were organizing?

Oh absolutely, especially on the issue of pesticides. Because you know, the pesticides in the fields really affect women even more than they do men. They affect children and they affect women more than they do men. But we have had so many women that have cancer, so many children have been born with deformities. And men also that have died because they were spraying pesticides in the field and they died of lung cancer. This is a really, really big issue to this day for farmworkers. Because even though we were able to get many of the pesticides banned, they keep inventing new ones. And it was actually just a couple of months ago that a group of farmworkers working in a field near Bakersfield were poisoned. And one of the pesticides that affected them was one that was recently taken off the restricted list by President Trump. [Editor’s note: The Environmental Protection Agency, under President Obama, had concluded that the pesticide chlorpyrifos posed a risk to consumers. In March, the Trump administration’s EPA reversed course and decided to keep the pesticide on the market.]

One of things in the documentary that stayed with me is that you say that for a long time, you didn’t think it was right to take credit for your work.

You know what? I’ve thought about that a lot. When we had our first constitutional convention for the National Farm Workers Association and we were having elections and Cesar [Chavez] was running the meeting, he stepped down from the dais and came up to me. He said, “Who’s going to nominate you for vice president?” And I said, “Oh, I don’t have to be on the board. I just want to serve all the women out there.” How many of us have thought that way?

And he said, “You’re crazy.” So I did — I grabbed somebody to nominate me. But if Cesar hadn’t told me to, I wouldn’t have thought about it. And I think that’s a problem with us as women — we don’t think we need to be in the power structure, that we need to be on those boards where decisions are being made. Sometimes we think well, I’m not really prepared to take that position or that role. But I say [to women out there]: Just do it like the guys do it — pretend that you know. And then you learn on the job.

The slogan “Si se puede” — “Yes, we can” — that was you. How did you come up with that?

We were in Arizona. We were organizing people in the community to come to support us. They had passed a law in Arizona that if you said, “boycott,” you could go to prison for six months. And if you said “strike,” you could go to prison. So we were trying to organize against that law. And I was speaking to a group of professionals in Arizona, to see if they could support us. And they said, “Oh, here in Arizona you can’t do any of that. In Arizona no se puede — no you can’t.” And I said, “No, in Arizona si se puede!” And when I went back to our meeting that we had every night there … I gave that report to everybody and when I said, “Si se puede,” everybody started shouting, “Si se puede! Si se puede!” And so that became the slogan of our campaign in Arizona and now is the slogan for the immigrant rights movement, you know, on posters. We can do it. I can do it. Si se puede.

That must make you smile every time you hear it.

Oh, it does. I always feel very happy.

Sunday Puzzle: Three Words. Two Homophones. One Conjunction.

Sep 17, 2017   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on Sunday Puzzle: Three Words. Two Homophones. One Conjunction.

Sunday Puzzle

NPR


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NPR

Sunday Puzzle

NPR

On-air challenge: Every answer is a familiar three-word phrase that has “and” in the middle. Each sentence contains two words that have homophones that will complete the phrase.

Ex. A cane makes an infirm person able to walk. CAIN AND ABEL

  1. I found a beautiful reed on the river’s right bank.
  2. Some friends of mine say “hi’s” in Lowe’s housewares department.
  3. The musician composed a new hymn for the “Ben Hur” soundtrack.
  4. The woodworker won a chisel and awl in a lottery.
  5. A dozen tix to “The Bourne Identity” cost a lot of bread.
  6. A vegetable shortage of peas and corn caused long queues at the supermarket.
  7. The chef had parsley, sage, and thyme tied up in bundles.
  8. The field was mown after the grass had grown too high.
  9. Bret Harte was the sole author of “The Luck of Roaring Camp”
  10. You can always reach me by cell phone

Last week’s challenge: This challenge came from listener Al Gori of Cozy Lake, N.J. Think of a famous quotation with 8 words. The initial letters of the first 4 words themselves spell a word, and the initial letters of the last 4 words spell another word. Both words rhyme with “jab.” What quotation is it?

Answer: Float like a butterfly, sting like a bee (Muhammad Ali) — FLAB, SLAB

Winner: Jonas Singer of Washington, D.C.

Next week’s challenge: This puzzle is for the new school year. Think of two antonyms, each in three letters. Set them side by side. In between them arrange the letters of TRY TO ACE in some order. The result will name someone at school. Who is it?

Submit Your Answer

If you know the answer to next week’s challenge, submit it here. Listeners who submit correct answers win a chance to play the on-air puzzle. Important: Include a phone number where we can reach you Thursday, Sept. 21, at 3 p.m. ET.

Watch The Secret Sisters, Lilly Hiatt, Aaron Lee Tasjan And More Perform Live

Sep 16, 2017   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on Watch The Secret Sisters, Lilly Hiatt, Aaron Lee Tasjan And More Perform Live

Live from the Americana Music Festival and Conference, WMOT — in collaboration with World Cafe, VuHaus and NPR Music — brings you a live webcast of the WMOT Roots Radio 89.5 Birthday Bash at the Yee-Haw Tent in downtown Nashville. Watch the live video webcast starting at 11:00 a.m. CST/noon EST on Saturday, Sept. 16 via VuHaus, above.

Schedule:

11:00 a.m. CST: Paul Thorn
12:00 p.m. CST: Reckless Kelly
1:00 p.m. CST: Whitney Rose
2:00 p.m. CST: The Secret Sisters
3:00 p.m. CST: The Deep Dark Woods
4:00 p.m. CST: The O’Connor Band with Mark O’Connor
5:00 p.m. CST: Lilly Hiatt
6:00 p.m. CST: Texas Gentlemen
7:00 p.m. CST: Aaron Lee Tasjan
8:00 p.m. CST: Katie Pruitt
9:00 p.m. CST: Vandoliers

High-Tech ‘Bodega’ Falls Short Of The Real Thing

Sep 16, 2017   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on High-Tech ‘Bodega’ Falls Short Of The Real Thing

Jesus Martinez (L) works at his bodega grocery store in the Queens borough of New York City in 2007. Tech entrepreneurs got pushback for calling their startup “Bodega.”

Spencer Platt/Getty Images


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Jesus Martinez (L) works at his bodega grocery store in the Queens borough of New York City in 2007. Tech entrepreneurs got pushback for calling their startup “Bodega.”

Spencer Platt/Getty Images

A couple of high-tech entrepreneurs thought they’d put a personable name on an impersonal product.

Paul McDonald and Ashwath Rajan, formerly of Google, unveiled a box this week with glass doors, stocked with nonperishable items, that people can unlock with their cellphones while a camera records what they take and charges them.

It’s essentially a tech-connected vending machine. But the entrepreneurs chose a name for their venture that many people found offensive: Bodega.

The name is taken from small neighborhood shops, usually in New York, stocked with products people run out of or suddenly crave: candy, gum, soda, and yes, cigarettes, newspapers, lottery tickets, condoms, tampons and soap.

Nobody Takes The Bodega Out Of The Corner. Not Even A Startup

Many bodegas are in Hispanic neighborhoods, run by Hispanic and Asian shopkeepers. They become a stop for people out to walk their dogs, or take a stroll from their apartments, who decide to linger for a few minutes to buy a magazine or candy bar and talk to other people about how bad the Mets are, how nice the weather is, and kvetch about politicians, landlords and the Number 7 train from Flushing.

Bodegas are often the place sixth-graders stop after school to buy a Coke or a candy bar. The bodega owner knows their name and tells them, “Run home and do your homework.” The bodega owner will often let a good customer just take something they need if they have no money until they get their paycheck.

There is no app for that.

Real bodegas are small, affordable businesses you don’t need a stock offering to open. But if the high-tech-minibar-faux bodega takes off, it could be at the expense of bodegas owned by real people, who keep a cat on the counter and become vital characters in a neighborhood.

New York City Bodegas And The Generations Who Love Them

“To me it’s like sacrilegious — you wanna take this name and use it to make money off it?” Frank Garcia, who chairs the state Coalition of Hispanic Chambers of Commerce, told the New York Post.

The instant reaction on social media was so sharp that Paul McDonald and Ashwath Rajan had to quickly write on Medium, “We did some homework — speaking to New Yorkers, branding people, and even running some survey work asking about the name and any potential offense it might cause. But it’s clear that we may not have been asking the right questions of the right people.

“Despite our best intentions and our admiration for traditional bodegas, we clearly hit a nerve,” said the entrepreneurs, “we intended only admiration.”

But their statement leaves a question unanswered. Will the name stay?

How Two Nurses Decided To Help Babies Touched By Opioid Crisis

Sep 15, 2017   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on How Two Nurses Decided To Help Babies Touched By Opioid Crisis

Nurse practitioners Carla Saunders (left) and Kyle Cook at the East Tennessee Children’s Hospital earlier this year.

Courtesy of Carla Saunders


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Nurse practitioners Carla Saunders (left) and Kyle Cook at the East Tennessee Children’s Hospital earlier this year.

Courtesy of Carla Saunders

Kyle Cook and Carla Saunders are neonatal nurses at a children’s hospital in Knoxville, Tenn., where they’ve spent decades caring for infants. In the summer of 2010, their jobs began to change.

“We had six babies in the nursery who were in withdrawal,” remembers Saunders, 51.

The babies were inconsolable. They had tremors. “We couldn’t fix it; we couldn’t make these babies better,” says Cook, 53. “Little did we know that was the tip of the iceberg. We had 10, and then 15, and then, at one point, 37 babies in the NICU that were withdrawing. We were bursting at the seams.”

“We were completely unprepared and short-staffed,” Saunders says. She remembers a nurse in tears holding a screaming baby. “We have got to do something,” the nurse said, because what they were doing wasn’t working.

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Their small children’s hospital in east Tennessee was at the time emblematic of the substance abuse problem happening all over the U.S. “And so we went looking to the experts, you know, let’s call across the country, and let’s find out what’s the best way to treat these babies,” Saunders says.

They discovered that nobody knew. “And who knew that we would become the experts?” Cook says.

The nurses wound up helping to establish one of the first treatment protocols for babies exposed to opioids and a program connecting mothers with treatment and therapy.

“When you see a baby, especially one that has been in your care for a long time, that has been off the charts in withdrawal, and you’ve done everything you possibly can and you finally get this baby acting like a normal baby, and then he smiles at you, and to know that you’ve made a difference in a mother’s life — I mean, that will carry you through the darkest times, knowing that, my gosh, we did this,” Clark says.

Audio produced for Morning Edition by Liyna Anwar.

StoryCorps is a national nonprofit that gives people the chance to interview friends and loved ones about their lives. These conversations are archived at the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress, allowing participants to leave a legacy for future generations. Learn more, including how to interview someone in your life, at StoryCorps.org.

British Police Investigate ‘Incident’ At London Subway Station

Sep 15, 2017   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on British Police Investigate ‘Incident’ At London Subway Station

Police say they are investigating an incident at a southwest London subway station after reports of an explosion.

London’s ambulance service tell Reuters that it has sent its hazardous area response team to an incident at a London metro station after reports of a blast.

Metro.co.uk reports:

“A bomb squad and armed police have all been seen arriving at the station following the blast which happened in a white bucket inside a Lidl carrier bag.

“Wires could be seen coming out of the bucket which was on fire.

“A metro.co.uk reporter at the scene described seeing people with facial burns, adding that they were ‘really badly burned’ and ‘their hair was coming off’.

“Fire crews and paramedics also rushed to the scene to help people after the fireball went down the carriage.

“They said that the rear of the train filled with smoke and people left the train, some panicking, at Parsons Green.”

The incident happened during rush hour when the Underground system is crowded. Passengers were advised to use alternate routes.

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