Browsing articles in "News from US"

A Story Of Twins Reunited After Death

Jun 23, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on A Story Of Twins Reunited After Death

Twin brothers killed in Europe during World War II were separated in death. One was buried above Omaha Beach and the other in an cemetery in Belgium. Their remains will soon rest together in Normandy.

Saturday Sports: The World Cup

Jun 23, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Saturday Sports: The World Cup

We have the latest on the ongoing World Cup in Russia.

Ex-New York Rep. Grimm Aims To Resurrect His Political Career

Jun 22, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Ex-New York Rep. Grimm Aims To Resurrect His Political Career

After serving time in federal prison for tax evasion, former Republican Rep. Michael Grimm of Staten Island wants a comeback. The first step is trying to unseat his successor, Dan Donovan.

What Trump Supporters Think Of The President’s Week

Jun 22, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on What Trump Supporters Think Of The President’s Week

How are President Trump’s supporters responding to him reversing his position on implementing the family separation policy? David Greene talks with conservative talk show host Chris Buskirk.

Aung San Suu Kyi Faces Mounting Criticism Abroad Over Rohingya Crisis

Jun 21, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Aung San Suu Kyi Faces Mounting Criticism Abroad Over Rohingya Crisis

Once hailed as a human rights standard-bearer, Suu Kyi is criticized internationally for her inaction in the ethnic cleansing of Rohingyas in Myanmar. Nearly a million of them escaped to Bangladesh.

Koko The Gorilla Dies; Redrew The Lines Of Animal-Human Communication

Jun 21, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Koko The Gorilla Dies; Redrew The Lines Of Animal-Human Communication

Koko, the gorilla who became an ambassador to the human world through her ability to communicate, has died. She’s seen here at age 4, telling Francine “Penny” Patterson, left, that she is hungry. In the center is June Monroe, an interpreter for the deaf at St. Luke’s Church, who helped to teach Koko.

Bettmann/Bettmann Archive


hide caption

toggle caption

Bettmann/Bettmann Archive

Koko, the gorilla who became an ambassador to the human world through her ability to communicate, has died. She’s seen here at age 4, telling Francine “Penny” Patterson, left, that she is hungry. In the center is June Monroe, an interpreter for the deaf at St. Luke’s Church, who helped to teach Koko.

Bettmann/Bettmann Archive

“The Gorilla Foundation is sad to announce the passing of our beloved Koko,” the famous research center says, informing the world of the death of a gorilla who fascinated and elated millions of people with her facility for language.

Koko, who was 46, died in her sleep on Tuesday morning, the Gorilla Foundation said. At birth, she was named Hanabiko — Japanese for “fireworks child,” because she was born on the Fourth of July in 1971. She was a western lowland gorilla.

“Her impact has been profound and what she has taught us about the emotional capacity of gorillas and their cognitive abilities will continue to shape the world,” the Gorilla Foundation said.

Throughout her life, Koko’s abilities made headlines. After she began communicating with humans through American Sign Language, she was featured by National Geographic – and she took her own picture (in a mirror) for the magazine’s cover.

That cover came out in 1978 – seven years after Koko was chosen as an infant to work on a language research project with the psychologist Penny Patterson at the San Francisco Zoo. In 1985, the magazine profiled the affectionate relationship between the gorilla and her kitten: Koko and All Ball.

In 2001, Koko made a fast friend in comedian Robin Williams, trying on his glasses, showing him around, and getting him to tickle her. Then they made faces at each other – and the gorilla seemed to recall seeing Williams in a movie. Years later, in 2014, Koko was one of many who mourned Williams’ passing.

Koko amazed scientists in 2012, when she showed she could learn to play the recorder. The feat revealed mental acuity, but also, crucially, that primates can learn to intricately control their breathing – something that had been assumed to be beyond their abilities.

Her ability to interact with people made Koko an international celebrity. But she also revealed the depth and strength of a gorilla’s emotional life, sharing moments of glee and sadness with researchers Patterson and Ron Cohn.

How Human Should A Gorilla Be?

As Barbara J. King wrote for NPR about the BBC documentary:

Famously, Koko felt quite sad in 1984 when her adopted kitten Ball was hit by a car and died. How do we know? Here is nonhuman primate grief mediated through language: In historical footage in the film, Patterson is seen asking Koko, “What happened to Ball?” In reply, Koko utters these signs in sequence: cat, cry, have-sorry, Koko-love. And then, after a pause, two more signs: unattention, visit me.”

Today, it’s humanity’s turn to mourn Koko.

Thousands of people are commiserating on the Gorilla Foundation’s Facebook page posting about Koko’s death. The top comment comes from Jess Cameron:

“Legit bawling like a baby right now. This news just breaks my heart. From an early age I was fascinated with Koko and she taught me so much about love, kindness, respect for animals, and our planet.”

With Koko’s passing, the Gorilla Foundation says it will honor her legacy, working on wildlife conservation in Africa, a great ape sanctuary in Maui, and a sign language app.

The foundation says those who want to share condolences can do so by emailing kokolove@koko.org.

Saba Abraha’s Glittery Single ‘Do’s & Don’ts’ Wades Through Confusion

Jun 20, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Saba Abraha’s Glittery Single ‘Do’s & Don’ts’ Wades Through Confusion

Saba Abraha.

Jazzlyn Tolson/Courtesy of the artist


hide caption

toggle caption

Jazzlyn Tolson/Courtesy of the artist

Saba Abraha.

Jazzlyn Tolson/Courtesy of the artist

A conflicted mind can cause utter chaos. For Saba Abraha, a D.C.-area RB singer, music is her outlet to unpack her thoughts to keep from spiraling. Abraha’s writing process for her latest track “Do’s Don’ts,” premiered by NPR Music, occurred after the death of her father and a sudden immersion into circles the music industry, a sequence of events that left her reeling in confusion.

Abraha’s vocals slide over glittery and sharply splintered production by De’Jour Thomas. She depicts this time in song as moonlit “crossroads to the unknown.”

“Nightmares of demons, I wish I was awake / Seems like the people have lost themselves in vain / I wish to recover from this, but it causes pain / I choose to know myself / I wish to wish you help,” she sings in the second verse.

“I had questions that seemed like no one could answer,” Abraha tells NPR Music. “In a way, you could say the harsh realities of the world were suddenly in focus. Shortly after, I fell into a new world of music; where people wore masks and grinned at your shortcomings. It seemed I was constantly rummaging through the lessons I was raised on, attempting to find the missing piece of the puzzle “

Abraha’s inspirations range from Missy Elliott to Corinne Bailey Rae for, as she puts it, “their unique approach and unwillingness to stray from their truth.” The singer employs the same sense of fearlessness with this single. These dark hues and knowing vocals of “Do’s and Don’ts” serve as the foundation for the artist’s forthcoming sophomore EP, due out later this year, and will help to settle the dust of a dizzied subconscious with each replay.

Mothers Sing About The ‘Blame Kit’

Jun 20, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Mothers Sing About The ‘Blame Kit’

Mothers’ new album, Render Another Ugly Method, will be out on ANTI.

Tonje Thilesen/Courtesy of the artist


hide caption

toggle caption

Tonje Thilesen/Courtesy of the artist

Mothers’ new album, Render Another Ugly Method, will be out on ANTI.

Tonje Thilesen/Courtesy of the artist

A few years ago, when Mothers came to perform a Tiny Desk Concert, I was taken by Kristine Leschper’s gentle fragility. She sang songs that were beautifully stark but barely hung together. Now Mothers have returned with new songs that are more challenging to listen to, with a sound that is less benevolent, and somewhat demanding in its tone.

Mothers

Part of why Mothers music has changed is the result of experiencing a wide variety of art and music while touring together. “That first year of touring was an engrossing and resonant jumble of new experiences and unfamiliar music,” Kristine Leschper told me in an email. That music included, The Fall, This Heat and songs on the now defunct experimental label OSR Tapes.

Kristine Leschper says “Blame Kit” is the first of many songs on the new record that deals with “the body as an object that can be expanded or collapsed, inhabited or deserted. The second section [of the song] was inspired by a passage I discovered in a secondhand shop, flipping through a book of case studies of schizophrenic and autistic children: His body will at one moment expand to contain things and events that are outside of it, and at the next shrink to near-nothingness… Uncertain of the boundaries of his body, things on the outside become terribly important.’ I couldn’t stop thinking about that.”

The song’s title, “Blame Kit,” was puzzling to me though for Kristine “A blame kit is exactly what it sounds like — an apparatus or social mechanism that aims to shift or imply guilt onto a particular person, group, or idea. During the writing of this record, I felt especially interested in devices. I was only asking a question — wondering if something abstract like ‘value’ or ‘blame’ could be given a set of organizational rules that would allow it to be applied to any specific thing, supposing it matched your invented set of requirements. In this way it is also an exploration of perspective and relativity.”

The record was produced by John Congleton known to bring out the best in so many artists including St. Vincent, Lucy Dacus, John Grant, Sleater-Kinney, Sigur Ros and more. John wrote to say that the first time I heard Mothers I knew it was a band that I wanted to work with. So special and idiosyncratic, it’s impossible to ignore their point of view. I loved making the record and seeing them work.”

The new album by Mothers is titled Render Another Ugly Method and includes musicians Matthew Anderegg, Chris Goggans and Drew Kirby. It’s due out this fall on ANTI- Records. Mothers is also about to begin a tour with Lucy Dacus and Japanese Breakfast.

Southern Border Crisis Has To Be Fixed By Congress, Gidley Says

Jun 19, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Southern Border Crisis Has To Be Fixed By Congress, Gidley Says

David Greene and Steve Inskeep talk to White House spokesman Hogan Gidley about the administration’s policy to separate families at the southern border. NPR’s Mara Liasson weighs in on the discussion.

Swiss Soccer Fans Have Difficulty Getting To The World Cup

Jun 19, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Swiss Soccer Fans Have Difficulty Getting To The World Cup

The AFP news service reports one car load was following a GPS and had no idea they were passing through a war zone in eastern Ukraine. Other Swiss fans booked a hotel in the wrong city.

Pages:1234567...315»

Categories

Current Times

  • NPT: 2018-06-24 01:01 PM
  • EDT: 2018-06-24 03:16 AM
  • PDT: 2018-06-24 12:16 AM