Browsing articles in "News from US"

See 200 Years Of Twists And Turns Of Census Citizenship Questions

Apr 24, 2019   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on See 200 Years Of Twists And Turns Of Census Citizenship Questions

If the Trump administration gets its way, federal law will require this question to be asked of each person living in all of the country’s households in 2020: “Is this person a citizen of the United States?” It’s been close to 70 years since a citizenship question has been included among the census questions for every U.S. household.

The question’s wording comes from a survey the Census Bureau began conducting annually in every county after the 2000 census with about 1 in 38 households — the American Community Survey, which has since replaced the census as the government’s way of collecting citizenship information.

How the federal government has used the census in the past to ask about citizenship status has varied over the years. For decades, the census asked only about the citizenship status of people born outside the U.S. who were later naturalized, or became U.S. citizens.

From the first time in 1820 to the most recent in 2000, when only a small sample of households were asked, questions about citizenship on the census have had a history of stops and starts, twists and turns over 200 years.

Loading…

World’s First Malaria Vaccine Launches In Sub-Saharan Africa

Apr 24, 2019   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on World’s First Malaria Vaccine Launches In Sub-Saharan Africa

Loading…

Don’t see the graphic above? Click here.

Today health officials are making history. They’re rolling out the first approved vaccine aimed at stopping a human parasite. It’s for malaria — and the hopes are that one day the vaccine could save the lives of tens of thousands of children each year.

“This [rollout] is a massive success of the research community,” says Dr. Pedro Alonso, who directs the Global Malaria Programme at the World Health Organization.

This vaccine — called RTS,S — is one of the few immunizations designed and launched specifically to help young children in Africa, says Deborah Atherly at PATH, a nonprofit that helped develop the immunization.

“It’s a pro-poor vaccine, if you will,” Atherly says. “I think that’s also a really important milestone in vaccine development and introduction.”

Malaria is still a top killer of children worldwide, but children in Africa are most affected. Every two minutes a child or baby there dies of the disease. Some children can have up to six bouts of malaria in just one year, says Dr. Mary Hamel of WHO.

The vaccine took more than 30 years — and more than $500 million — to develop. It was an international collaboration among WHO, PATH, the pharmaceutical company GlaxoSmithKline and a network of African countries. The Bill Melinda Gates Foundation — which is a sponsor of NPR and this blog — is also a funder of the vaccine.

On Tuesday, toddlers in Malawi started receiving the immunization. Then children in Ghana and Kenya will follow shortly. The goal is to vaccinate about 360,000 children in this large-scale pilot project. And then WHO will determine the best way to roll out the vaccine elsewhere, Atherly says.

The big question is: Will this vaccine work as well in the real world as it has in clinical trials, says epidemiologist William Moss, who directs the International Vaccine Access Center.

“The launch of the malaria vaccine is really a landmark,” Moss says, “but the vaccine’s efficacy is much lower than that for many of our other childhood vaccines.”

In a large trial, the vaccine reduced the number of clinical malaria cases by about 40 percent and severe malaria cases by about 30 percent, Moss says. By comparison, some childhood vaccines offer more than 90 percent protection.

Parasites, such as malaria, are more complex than viruses and bacteria, Moss says. They can have more sophisticated machinery for evading our immune systems. So creating effective vaccines against them is quite challenging, he says.

Still, Moss thinks the vaccine could have a significant impact on children’s health because malaria is so common in parts of sub-Saharan Africa. “There are estimates that one life would be saved for every 200 children who are vaccinated,” he says.

Another issue with the vaccine is that children need four doses. That means four trips to a clinic — which could be tough for some families in rural areas, Moss says.

But PATH’s Atherly thinks many families will want to make the extra trips.

“Just from a human perspective, I think if a mom can provide something for her child that will help control this disease, she will,” Atherly says. “We believe there will be a lot of demand from the mothers and other caregivers.”

The Traffic Tariff

Apr 23, 2019   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on The Traffic Tariff

Stacey congestion pricing

Stacey congestion pricing

    The Indicator from Planet Money

    The Indicator

    NPR


    hide caption

    toggle caption

    NPR

As cities all over the world grow, they’re struggling with crowded streets and polluted air. New York City has decided to try out one possible solution: congestion pricing. Drivers will soon be charged a toll to enter certain crowded neighborhoods. Officials hope it will cut down on traffic and bring in badly needed funds to help repair the city’s public transportation system.

Today on the show, Stacey Vanek Smith and Darius Rafieyan venture out into Midtown Manhattan during rush hour to see if congestion pricing is the solution that New York needs.

Music: “Jet Set Go”. Find us: Twitter / Facebook / Newsletter.

Subscribe to our show on Apple Podcasts, PocketCasts and NPR One.

Following Easter Attacks In Sri Lanka, A Social Media Ban Disabled Some Apps

Apr 23, 2019   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Following Easter Attacks In Sri Lanka, A Social Media Ban Disabled Some Apps

Sri Lanka government officials shut down social media in the wake of the attacks. Such moves are more common and signal how tech companies struggle to maintain control of who uses their platforms.

#NPRPoetry: Alberto Rios On The Power Of ‘Or’

Apr 22, 2019   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on #NPRPoetry: Alberto Rios On The Power Of ‘Or’

It’s National Poetry Month, and for our series #NPRPoetry, NPR’s Sacha Pfeiffer speaks with poet Alberto Rios, who combed Twitter for his favorite original poems.

After Notre Dame Fire, Parisians Mark Easter Elsewhere

Apr 22, 2019   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on After Notre Dame Fire, Parisians Mark Easter Elsewhere

Parisians and visitors from around the world mark Easter days after part of the iconic Notre Dame Cathedral burned.

Son ‘Disturbed’ By Russian Use Of Family Photo Discovered In Mueller Report

Apr 21, 2019   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Son ‘Disturbed’ By Russian Use Of Family Photo Discovered In Mueller Report



SACHA PFEIFFER, HOST:

Now we’re going to hear from someone who was affected by Russian trolls. Ronnie Hipshire is a retired coal miner in West Virginia. His father, Lee, was also a coal miner, and he died of complications from black lung disease. Ronnie learned something disturbing on Page 31 of the Mueller report. Without his family’s permission, a Russian troll farm called the Internet Research Agency had used a photo of his dad for a pro-Trump poster. Ronnie Hipshire is with us from Logan, W.Va., to explain how this unfolded.

Ronnie, welcome to the program. And I wonder if you could first describe this photo to us because I’ve seen it, and it’s very memorable – has a big impact.

RONNIE HIPSHIRE: OK, I sure will. Back in 1974, Earl Dotter, a photojournalist with the MWA, was put with my dad in the Paragon Mine (ph) to sort of shadow him all day long to see in the mines why so many men were getting killed and so many things were happening back in the ’70s. And my dad was exiting the mine after the day, and Earl shot this photo of my father coming out of the Paragon Mine. And the picture shows him after a hard day’s work.

What I didn’t like about seeing this on the Mueller report is them stealing my dad’s picture and putting it on a Trump campaign rally. And my dad was one of the most staunch Democrats that you’ll ever see in your life. And he never would have even thought about putting his face on something like that. It just was beyond me to see it. I just – it disturbed me big-time because I know what my dad would have thought.

PFEIFFER: How did you learn that it was in the Mueller report?

HIPSHIRE: Earl Dotter sent me an email telling me about it.

PFEIFFER: The photographer.

HIPSHIRE: Yeah, the photographer that took the picture. He emailed me and told me about it, and I looked it up, and seen that, and went and took it up to my sister and showed her about it. And it just went through her, too, you know. It just – she couldn’t believe that it was used by the Russians to get someone elected. I guess you would call it a troll like your column, you know. It was something it wasn’t supposed to be ’cause it wasn’t through the blessing of Earl or us to have dad’s picture representing Donald Trump – something I know that he definitely would have never done.

PFEIFFER: Do you think you would feel any differently if the photo had been used to promote a different political issue that you support? So without your family’s permission, but an issue that you actually advocate for.

HIPSHIRE: If it was – they would come to me, right? Yes, I believe in that. I believe that dad would have – you know, he was a Democrat. He would love the Democrat Party.

PFEIFFER: What would you like to see happen to prevent this from happening to other people?

HIPSHIRE: I don’t know what you would do to keep them from doing it. If they can get in and steal stuff like this, how can they – how could you block the Internet down? I mean, I don’t know.

PFEIFFER: Ronnie Hipshire is a retired coal miner from West Virginia.

Ronnie, thank you for talking with us about this.

HIPSHIRE: Thank you. You have a blessed day.

(SOUNDBITE OF PAUL MIRROR’S “TIME AND PLACE”)

Copyright © 2019 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

Troll Watch: What We Learned From The Mueller Report

Apr 21, 2019   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Troll Watch: What We Learned From The Mueller Report



SACHA PFEIFFER, HOST:

And now we want to spend a few minutes looking at a specific piece of the Mueller report. It’s a large section about Russian troll activity and its impact on the 2016 election. That’s today’s topic in our regular segment called Troll Watch.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

PFEIFFER: This is where we usually look at what kind of fake news and memes were pushed by trolls this week. Today, we’re taking a slightly different perspective in asking what the Mueller report reveals about these operations. Joining us is Clint Watts, a former FBI special agent and now a distinguished research fellow at the Foreign Policy Research Institute.

Clint, thank you so much for talking with us.

CLINT WATTS: Thanks for having me.

PFEIFFER: The Mueller report examines the activities of a big troll farm based in St. Petersburg, Russia. It’s funded by a Russian oligarch. It’s called the IRA, short for the Internet Research Agency. Give us a mini-tutorial on what the Internet Research Agency is and why it gets mentioned so many times in the report.

WATTS: The Internet Research Agency is essentially a central hub for the disinformation put out by the Russian state-sponsored disinformation system – meaning that it helps coordinate the bringing together of state-sponsored propaganda like how RT, Russia Today, is funding news headlines, go into the social media landscape – and then how audiences are infiltrated through the use of personas that are false but also look like and talk like the audience they’re trying to influence.

PFEIFFER: Some of the information about this troll farm is redacted in the Mueller report, mainly because of ongoing investigations. But from what you were able to read, did you learn anything you didn’t already know?

WATTS: There were things that I had assumed or sort of calculated over the years writing about their disinformation that I didn’t know for sure. One was that in 2014, they were already starting to move to the U.S. audience base. They had also taken a field trip to the United States, which was a counter to the supposition that was put out in a lot of arguments that there must be Americans working for him.

In fact, they’d actually come to America. Something else that I thought was deeply frightening was we had heard about how the Russian troll farm had orchestrated protest inside the United States. But they had been doing that as early as 2015 and had done that after the election. This is a much longer period than we had known before.

PFEIFFER: The Mueller report contains specific examples of fake Twitter accounts controlled by this Russian troll farm. One was meant to look like an official account of the Tennessee Republican Party. Some of its tweets were critical of Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton, Elizabeth Warren. It was even retweeted by Trump campaign officials and Trump’s sons. Do you have any advice for regular people on social media for how they can spot when these accounts are fake, and you’re essentially being manipulated?

WATTS: It’s very difficult to spot a Russian influence account or a growing number of domestic misinformation accounts that appear around the elections. But things to always look for are, one, is it a verified account or not? I think the next part is, do you have a actual person’s name? Do you know where they’re physically located? Do they share media, live video, pictures of themselves that show them to be who they are? Oftentimes, the trolls would use flowers or dogs or pets – that sort of thing – or would take images off the web and use those. And people oftentimes would find themselves being used as a troll farm account.

So can you verify the identity of that? And if you can’t, you should not necessarily trust the information they’re sharing with you. You should not retweet it. And you shouldn’t share with others unless you really know where it’s coming from.

PFEIFFER: We obviously have another presidential election coming. Is there anything that you think can be learned from the Mueller report to try to prevent other foreign groups from influencing U.S. voters in 2020?

WATTS: One of the strange vulnerabilities of the Mueller report is that now that we’ve seen it, it actually alerts many actors to where the vulnerabilities still are in our country. One is election infrastructure. It’s been talked about it a lot, but the Congress has still not been able to pass the Honest Ads Act or the Election Integrity Act. We need our institutions to be able to protect voting machines. We should have paper ballot backups. We should have verifiable audit trails. I think the next part is, in terms of social media, the social media companies have actually done far more than the U.S. government has to really build resilience going into 2020.

So the number one thing we need from our country, I think, at this point is leadership. Anytime falsehoods are levered for political purposes, that provides ripe ammunition for the Russian government or really any foreign actor to use that to divide us in this country. Russia won’t need to write fake news in 2020. Americans are doing plenty of that for themselves. And Russia can just repurpose and reuse that information to divide us. And I think that’s a vulnerability that really comes down to our leaders in Congress and at the White House.

PFEIFFER: That’s former FBI special agent Clint Watts, now with the Foreign Policy Research Institute.

Clint, thank you.

WATTS: Thank you.

Copyright © 2019 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

As Part Of Her Fight Against Anti-Semitism, One Woman Is Inviting Non-Jews To Seder

Apr 20, 2019   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on As Part Of Her Fight Against Anti-Semitism, One Woman Is Inviting Non-Jews To Seder

NPR’s Ailsa Chang talks with Marnie Fienberg, who created “2 for Seder” in honor of her mother-in-law, a victim of the Tree of Life synagogue shooting. The program invites two non-Jewish guests to each meal.

20 Years After The Columbine Shooting, Students And Staff Reflect On What Happened

Apr 20, 2019   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on 20 Years After The Columbine Shooting, Students And Staff Reflect On What Happened

Saturday marks the 20th anniversary of the school shooting at Columbine High School in Colorado. What’s changed and what’s stayed the same with regards to school safety and mental health since then?

Pages:1234567...375»

Categories

Current Times

  • NPT: 2019-04-24 06:42 PM
  • EDT: 2019-04-24 08:57 AM
  • PDT: 2019-04-24 05:57 AM