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Poll: Where Americans Draw Lines On Workplace Behavior

Feb 25, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Poll: Where Americans Draw Lines On Workplace Behavior



SARAH MCCAMMON, HOST:

People are reconsidering what behaviors are OK in the workplace and which are inappropriate with the Me Too movement taking hold over the last few months. NPR joined up with Ipsos to poll Americans on where they draw the line and what they’ve experienced at work. NPR’s Danielle Kurtzleben has been looking at the results. She joins us now. Hi, Danielle.

DANIELLE KURTZLEBEN, BYLINE: Hello.

MCCAMMON: So there’s been a lot of talk about gray areas in the midst of the Me Too movement. What’s OK, what’s not OK, what’s in between?

KURTZLEBEN: Right.

MCCAMMON: Give me a sense of what this poll found.

KURTZLEBEN: So, we asked people about a dozen workplace behaviors, you know, from unwanted touching to just asking about a co-worker’s social life. And on a lot of these, a majority of people thought that those behaviors were inappropriate on balance. The behaviors that people thought were the most inappropriate were deliberate touching but also some things we don’t hear about in this Me Too cultural moment right now, things like gossiping or speculating about your co-worker’s sexual preference. And meanwhile, at the other end of the spectrum, what the fewest people thought was inappropriate in all of the things that we asked was a co-worker asking a co-worker of equal rank out on a date. But even then, 30 percent of people said that was inappropriate.

MCCAMMON: So how pervasive did people think that these kinds of behaviors are at work?

KURTZLEBEN: On a lot of these, quite pervasive. You know, we asked people if they had seen these things happen in the workplace and even some things that people saw as very inappropriate like telling sexual stories or jokes or calling an adult female in the workplace babe or sweetie or, you know, some iteration of that. A majority of people said they had seen those things at work even though around 8 or 9 in 10 people thought those things were inappropriate. Likewise, about half of people have seen their co-worker discussing each other’s sexual preferences or history. And about a third say they have seen deliberate touching or leaning or cornering or something to that effect.

But on a lot of these behaviors where there’s near consensus that these things are inappropriate and where you have quite a few people saying, yeah, I’ve seen this happening, relatively few people – 1 in 10 or fewer – say they have actually done these things themselves. So, for example, more than half of people have seen someone telling a sexual joke or story at work. Fifteen percent of people say they have done that themselves.

MCCAMMON: It also seems like, especially in this moment, that it would be kind of hard to admit to a pollster that you’ve done any of these things. Am I right?

KURTZLEBEN: Right, yeah. And, you know, that is a concern in a poll like this, so we did this poll online. That should mitigate some of that. But aside from that, you know, there are a few other things to think about with this poll. First is that this is the first time that we have polled on these questions with Ipsos. We do not have anything else to compare this to. This is just a snapshot. So we don’t know if this is a change from people’s behaviors before the Me Too movement.

One other really big question mark with these questions is that the behaviors we asked people about, some of them are pretty ambiguous. And that’s intentionally ambiguous, right? Because one of the big challenges people are confronting in their workplaces right now is those gray areas you started out asking me about. Take commenting on a co-worker’s appearance, for example. Saying to a co-worker, hey, that’s a cool dress you’re wearing, that can be perceived as a very different thing from saying that dress looks great on you.

MCCAMMON: Right.

KURTZLEBEN: Two different things you could say about a co-worker’s appearance and two very different ways to perceive that.

MCCAMMON: Well, thanks, Danielle. Danielle Kurtzleben is a politics reporter with NPR. Good to have you here.

KURTZLEBEN: Yes, thank you.

Copyright © 2018 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

In ‘The Undressing,’ Li-Young Lee Processes Violence And Beauty Of Human Connection

Feb 25, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on In ‘The Undressing,’ Li-Young Lee Processes Violence And Beauty Of Human Connection



SARAH MCCAMMON, HOST:

In his latest book, “The Undressing,” poet Li-Young Lee explores the beauty and violence of human relationships and connection.

LI-YOUNG LEE: (Reading) I loved you before I was born. It doesn’t make sense, I know. I saw your eyes before I had eyes to see. And I’ve lived longing for your every look ever since.

MCCAMMON: Over the course of this slim volume of poems, a romantic moment stretches into a spiral of memory and longing, taking the reader on an emotional and sometimes turbulent journey that ends much like it began. Joining me now to discuss all of that and more is poet Li-Young Lee. He joins us from member station WQED in Pittsburgh. Li-Young Lee, thank you so much for joining us.

LEE: Thank you for having me, Sarah.

MCCAMMON: The inside jacket of this book, “The Undressing,” says that this collection of poems, quote, “attempts to uncover things hidden since the dawn of the world.” That sounds like a big undertaking. What do you mean by that?

LEE: Yeah (laughter). I was kind of shocked that I said that. I guess, you know, when one writes poetry, you enter into a relationship with the logos.

MCCAMMON: That’s Greek for word, right?

LEE: Yes, it’s the Greek for word. And when we write poems, we enter into a relationship – a deep relationship – with the logos, the word and with the dynamism of opposites, you know, meaning and nonsense, chaos and order and form and void. So it seems to me that when we write poems, we are trying to access or understand those deep laws. So that’s what I meant, I guess.

MCCAMMON: Some of your poems seem to express almost a frustration, though, with poetry. For example, there’s a section in your book where the speaker appears to be a woman. She’s referred to as she. And she says, you call yourself a poet. You tame high-finisher of paltry blots. You publish doubt and call it knowledge. You destroy the wisdom of ages to gratify your envy. You murder benevolence and virtue with condescension. You pretend to poetry and destroy imagination.

Do you ever feel that way about your own writing?

LEE: Oh, that’s exactly what I feel about my own writing. And I had to face this goddess-like figure in that poem who was telling me all these things and accusing me. And I face her every morning and every night before I go to bed, you know. That’s the – I don’t want to say a negative muse, but she – yeah, she accuses me of all those things. And I thought maybe if I gave expression to her accusations, I could kind of exorcise myself of those things, you know.

MCCAMMON: I want to talk about your family history, which you’ve written about over the years, including in “The Undressing.” You talk about your siblings, your father. I should mention you were born in Indonesia. Your father was a political prisoner there for a year, and then the family fled the country. If you would, I’d like you to read for us page 43, section 4.

LEE: OK.

(Reading) After 19 months in prison, eight of those in a leper colony – and he never got leprosy – my father was unrecognizable to me. So when I spied my mother slipping him a bar of soap during our visit, I thought that strange man had thieved it from her. As the guards were returning him to his cell, I ran after them and snatched the soap out of my father’s pocket, exposing my parents’ ploy. The guards had a good laugh when they discovered what was happening. Funny thing is, my father later told me, they didn’t punish him that time, though in the past he’d been tortured for lesser offenses. The reason was he’d been teaching the prison guards in secret, at their request, to read and write in English using the King James Bible.

MCCAMMON: Is this based on a true story?

LEE: This is an absolutely true story. You know, my father was a political prisoner. And the reason he was kept safe was because of the stories he told. He had a gift for storytelling. And even the guards loved to hear him tell stories, and so they kept him safe because of that. And they later found out that he also spoke and read English, and they had him teaching them.

MCCAMMON: You describe it almost as as a witness. You were not there, correct?

LEE: No.

MCCAMMON: So this is – how were these stories passed down to you?

LEE: They were passed down from my sister. Well, I was born there. And this was actually something that happened to me. But a lot of – I have an older sister and older brother who remembered a lot of these things. You know, they would always tell me things. You did this or you did that or we did this or this happened to us. And – so it’s my family – the family canon I’m trying to account for.

MCCAMMON: Li-Young Lee. His latest book of poems, “The Undressing,” is out now. Thank you so much for joining us.

LEE: Thank you, Sarah.

Copyright © 2018 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

Frank Kimbrough On Piano Jazz

Feb 24, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Frank Kimbrough On Piano Jazz

When pianist Frank Kimbrough was Marian McPartland’s guest in 1997, he was performing regularly with the Maria Schneider Jazz Orchestra at Visiones Jazz Club in New York, where he has been active on the jazz scene for nearly four decades. An educator and recording artist, Kimbrough was a founding member and composer-in-residence of the Jazz Composers Collective.

In this Piano Jazz session, Kimbrough’s graceful, romantic style is evident on a Herbie Nichols tune, “Wildflower.” He and McPartland duet on Sonny Rollins‘ “Doxy.”

Originally broadcast in the spring of 1997.

SET LIST

  • “Wildflower” (Nichols)
  • “20 Bars” (Kimbrough)
  • “Sweet and Lovely” (Arnheim, Tobias, Daniels)
  • “All Too Soon” (Ellington, Sigman)
  • “Wish I Knew” (Warren, Mack)
  • “Lonely Woman” (Coleman, Guryan)
  • “Doxy” (Rollins)

Gothamist Properties Will Be Revived Under New Ownership: Public Media

Feb 24, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Gothamist Properties Will Be Revived Under New Ownership: Public Media

Public radio stations WNYC, KPCC and WAMU announced Friday that they will revive the Gothamist local news sites in their cities. The sites had been shuttered by owner Joe Ricketts in November.

WNYC


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WNYC

Public radio stations WNYC, KPCC and WAMU announced Friday that they will revive the Gothamist local news sites in their cities. The sites had been shuttered by owner Joe Ricketts in November.

WNYC

Nearly four months after their billionaire owner shut them down, local news sites Gothamist, LAist and DCist will come back to life under new ownership: public radio stations.

WNYC in New York will buy Gothamist, Southern California’s KPCC will acquire LAist, and WAMU in Washington, D.C., is taking over DCist.

Billionaire Owner Shuts Down DNAinfo, Gothamist Sites A Week After Workers Unionize

WNYC says the move is largely funded by two anonymous donors “who are deeply committed to supporting local journalism initiatives and the station partners.” Though the financial details weren’t disclosed, the station says the acquistition resulted from a competitive process. The deal includes story archives, Internet domains, and social media assets.

The sites’ owner, TD Ameritrade founder Joe Ricketts, cited financial reasons in closing the sites. But the move came just a week after workers at its New York outlets voted to unionize. Ricketts had previously written a blog post titled, “Why I’m Against Unions At Businesses I Create.”

The deal to revive the sites was driven by Gothamist’s founders, Jake Dobkin and Jen Chung, Wired reports. Dobkin told the magazine the acquisition was “the best possible outcome” after the sudden shutdown of the sites in early November.

He told Wired that his team was looking for other local news organizations or radio stations to possibly acquire Chicagoist and SFist. Both sites say their archives are now operated by WNYC.

“The nonprofit WNYC business model has proved to be a growing and thriving thing while a lot of things have been going so deeply south,” Jim Schachter, head of WNYC’s news division, told the magazine.

New York Public Radio’s chief operating officer told The Wall Street Journal that each of the three stations has some “skin in the game.”

In an open letter to Southern Californians, KPCC Chief Content Officer Kristen Muller said that when LAist went dark, “a collective shudder ran through our newsroom. It was the neighborhood blog that could. We’d lost an important voice.”

KPCC is conducting a survey of Angelenos about what they miss about LAist and what their “dream version” of the site would look like.

“The health of our local media landscape matters,” Muller writes. “The future of our city depends on engaged residents to make informed choices. We’re excited by the opportunity to bring LAist back into the fight.”

WAMU says it plans a “slight refresh” of DCist before launching this spring. The station plans to hire three full-time staffers to run the site.

“This was an opportunity that when we learned about it, it seemed like such a natural fit,” WAMU chief content officer Andi McDaniel said in a statement. “The kind of community and neighborhood-level reporting that DCist does, and its beloved status locally, just aligned naturally with what our mission is.”

Trump Appears To Read From The NRA’s Script Hours After The Gun Lobby Chief’s Speech

Feb 23, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Trump Appears To Read From The NRA’s Script Hours After The Gun Lobby Chief’s Speech

President Trump meeting with state and local officials on school violence Thursday, including Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi.

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President Trump meeting with state and local officials on school violence Thursday, including Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi.

Evan Vucci/AP

In trying to clarify his Wednesday comments about arming teachers and other school personnel, President Trump, a day later, aligned himself even more closely with the National Rifle Association on the issue of teachers with guns and beefing up school security.

So much so, they seemed, at times, to be reading from the same script.

Here’s how the day started — with NRA Executive Vice President and CEO Wayne LaPierre at the Conservative Political Action Conference, or CPAC (emphasis ours):

“Can we protect so much with armed security, while we drop our kids off at school, that are so-called gun-free zones, that are wide-open targets for any crazy madman bent on evil to come there first? There first? In every community, PTAs, teachers’ unions, local law enforcement, moms and dads – they all must come together to implement the very best strategy to harden their schools, including effective trained, armed security that will absolutely protect every innocent child in this country. That has to happen now. Evil walks among us, and God help us if we do not harden our schools and protect our kids. …

“I refuse to leave this stage until I say one more time that we must immediately harden our schools. Every day— every day, young children are being dropped off at schools that are virtually wide open, soft targets for anyone bent on mass murder. It should not be easier for a madman to shoot up a school than a bank or a jewelry store or some Hollywood gala. Schools must be the most hardened targets in this country.”

Hours later, Trump was at the White House talking about school safety after last week’s mass shooting at a Parkland, Fla., high school. Notice, Trump used some of the same talking points, key words and phrases as LaPierre (again, emphasis ours):

“We have to harden our schools, not soften them. A gun-free zone to a killer or somebody who wants to be a killer, that’s like going in for the ice cream. That’s like ‘here I am, take me.’ We have to get smart on gun-free zones. When they see ‘this is a gun-free zone,’ that means that nobody has a gun except them, nobody’s going to be shooting bullets in the other direction. And they see that, it’s such a beautiful target. They live for gun-free zones.

“Now what I’d recommend doing is the people that do carry, we give them a bonus, we give them a little bit of a bonus, because frankly they’d feel more comfortable having the gun anyway, you give them a little bit of a bonus, so practically for free you’ve now made the school into a hardened target. …

“You want a hardened school, and I want a hardened school, too.”

Florida Sen. Marco Rubio Softens On Gun Restrictions

So when it comes to “hardening” schools, not a phrase that was in wide use before Thursday, and speaking out against “gun-free zones,” it appears the president and the NRA are, well, on the same page.

Trump does appear, however, to differ with the gun lobby when it comes to his support of increasing the age to be able to buy an assault rifle, from 18 to 21. Trump said he wasn’t concerned, though, about that.

NRA Leader Warns Conservatives Of 'Socialist Wave' In Wake Of Shooting

“I don’t think I’ll be going up against them,” Trump said. “I really think the NRA wants to do what’s right. I mean, they’re very close to me; I’m very close to them; they’re very, very great people. They love this country. They’re patriots. The NRA wants to do the right thing.”

And then in his next sentence, he may have given away the reason he and the NRA seem to be using similar, and sometimes the exact same, language.

“I’ve spoken to them often in the last two days,” Trump acknowledged, “and they want to do the right thing.”

Trump also reiterated his calls for arming more teachers and other adults working in the nations’ schools, something LaPierre also called for. But Trump has made several conflicting statements on the controversial issue over the course of less than 24 hours beginning Wednesday.

At White House listening sessions Wednesday with students and parents, including some from the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, where a gunman killed 17 people last week, Trump said, “If you had a teacher who was adept at firearms, it could very well end the attack very quickly.”

But Thursday morning, the president put out a barrage of tweets, defending himself and clarifying, “I never said ‘give teachers guns’ like was stated on Fake News.” He added that he wanted to look at the possibility of giving “giving concealed guns to gun adept teachers with military or special training experience.”

In his subsequent White House meeting Thursday with state and local officials to discuss schoool safety, Trump expanded on that.

“I don’t want teachers to have guns,” he said. “I want certain highly adept people, people that understand weaponry, guns. If they really have that aptitude, because not everybody has an aptitude for a gun. I think a concealed permit for teachers and letting people know there are people in the building with a gun, you won’t have, in my opinion, you won’t have these shootings.”

An armed guard was present at the Florida high school last week, but resigned Thursday after video footage showed that he never went inside the building to engage the shooter.

Trump Backs Arming Teachers During Emotional White House Listening Session

“He never went in,” Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel said at a news conference Thursday. “Devastated. Sick to my stomach,” is how Israel described how he felt when he learned the guard didn’t engage the shooter. “There are no words I mean these families lost their children.”

The idea of arming teachers, while pushed by the NRA, is opposed by the nation’s largest teachers union. In a statement, National Education Assocuation president Lily Eskelsen Garcia said:

“Bringing more guns into our schools does nothing to protect our students and educators from gun violence. Our students need more books, art and music programs, nurses and school counselors; they do not need more guns in their classrooms. Parents and educators overwhelmingly reject the idea of arming school staff. Educators need to be focused on teaching our students. We need solutions that will keep guns out of the hands of those who want to use them to massacre innocent children and educators. Arming teachers does nothing to prevent that.”

Trump on Thursday also expressed doubts about active shooter drills in schools, calling them “a very negative thing,” “crazy” and “very bad.”

“I’ll be honest with you,” Trump said. “If I’m a child, I’m 10 years old, and they say, ‘We’re going to have an active shooter drill,’ I say, ‘What’s that?’ ‘Well, people may come in and shoot you.’ I think that’s a very negative thing to be talking about, to be honest with you. I don’t like it. I’d much rather have a hardened school.”

The president said unless a school has “offensive capability, you’re wasting your time, you’re wasting your time.”

The president also shifted blame from guns to violent movies and video games. They are “really shaping young people’s thoughts,” Trump contended, reminding of the national debate after Columbine in 1999. The shooters at Columbine listened to the music of rocker Marilyn Manson, popular with high-schoolers all over the country at the time.

“The Columbine era destroyed my entire career at the time,” Manson told The Guardian this past September.

Trump claimed Thursday, “You see these movies, and they’re so violent and yet a kid is able to see the movie if sex isn’t involved.”

He then called for a ratings system, something that has long existed for movies and video games.

Two survivors of the Stoneman Douglas shooting disputed the president’s logic.

“My friends and I have been playing video games our whole lives, and seen, of course, violent movies,” Samuel Zeif told CNN, “but never have we ever felt driven or provoked by those action in those games to do something as horrible as this.”

Chris Grady called the Presidents’ comments “a pathetic excuse.”

“I grew up playing video games,” Grady said, citing Call of Duty and other first-person shooter games. “I would never, ever dream of taking the lives of any of my peers.

“So it’s just pathetic.”

South Korean Speedskaters Left A Teammate Behind, Now Fans Want Them Off The Team

Feb 23, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on South Korean Speedskaters Left A Teammate Behind, Now Fans Want Them Off The Team

Two South Korean speed skaters face public outrage for unsportsmanlike behavior during a race. Now fans want them banned from the national team.

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Two South Korean speed skaters face public outrage for unsportsmanlike behavior during a race. Now fans want them banned from the national team.

ARIS MESSINIS/AFP/Getty Images

Two South Korean speedskaters who humiliated their teammate are facing a swift backlash from fans who are demanding the women be banned from the national team. The fans’ petition has gathered more than 579,000 signatures over two days.

The painful drama played out on the ice on Monday during the pursuit team quarterfinals race when Noh Seon-Yeong was left behind by the two faster women on team, leaving Noh to cross the finish line roughly four seconds later — a glacial delay in the sport.

And when she broke down in tears after the race — in which they came in seventh — they ignored her and walked away.

The fans are not having it.

They are furious over the public shaming and unsportsmanlike display by Kim Bo-reum and Park Ji Woo and have launched a petition appealing to the South Korean president to remove the young women from the national team. The online petition calls it “an obvious national disgrace” to have Kim and Park represent the country in the Olympics.

The presidential Blue House responded to the public outcry saying it “plans to respond to the petition at an appropriate time. We will likely pass our recommendations or express our views to relevant bodies,” according to CNN.

Leaving Noh to fend for herself — kind of like a wounded animal on the Sahara — appeared especially vindictive to pursuit team speedskating fans because the race is only over when the final member of a trio finishes the race. Meaning there is nothing to gain by bolting away.

In fact, skaters often trade places between the lead, middle and rear positions — sometimes physically pushing the slowest teammate ahead — to ensure that the pack sticks together and makes it across the finish line as quickly as possible. It is the only speedskating competition where physical contact among racers on the same team is allowed.

Kim and Park also made matters worse in a series of interviews and non-apology apologies. Immediately following the race, Kim told The Korea Times, “We practiced a lot for the Olympics and our midway race was quite good,” she said. “As you saw it, the racer was far behind us and the gap had become even wider as we neared the finish line… I regret our record.”

Park similarly insinuated that Noh was to blame for the team’s poor performance and failure to reach the semifinals, according to the newspaper.

The Korean Herald reported both women were met with an onslaught of criticism over social media from fans who say they should have helped Noh and have accused Kim and Park of bullying. Apparently, the flurry of angry posts and comments led Kim to switch her social media accounts to private.

She also offered this statement in a separate press conference: “I think many people were hurt after seeing [the interview after the race] so I am really sorry for that. … I became greedy and focused only when I reached the finish line I realized she was behind.”

Reuters reported the South Korean team finished eighth in the women’s team pursuit final on Wednesday.

After the race Noh and Kim headed straight to the locker room. Park had one comment: “I’m sorry.”

A New Survey Finds 81 Percent Of Women Have Experienced Sexual Harassment

Feb 22, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on A New Survey Finds 81 Percent Of Women Have Experienced Sexual Harassment

Activists participate in the Take Back The Workplace March and #MeToo Survivors March Rally on Nov. 12, 2017, in Hollywood, Calif. A new survey offers the first set of nationwide data on prevalence, showing that the problem is pervasive and women are most often the victims.

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Activists participate in the Take Back The Workplace March and #MeToo Survivors March Rally on Nov. 12, 2017, in Hollywood, Calif. A new survey offers the first set of nationwide data on prevalence, showing that the problem is pervasive and women are most often the victims.

Sarah Morris/Getty Images

Back in October 2017, women took to social media to share their experiences of sexual harassment. The #MeToo movement was born and quickly went viral, spurring a national and global discussion on the issue.

In The Wake Of Harvey Weinstein Scandal, Women Say #MeToo

Many women have since come forward with their experiences of being sexually harassed by colleagues and bosses, costing influential men in the entertainment industry and the media — including journalists here at NPR — their jobs.

And yet, there has been little data collected on the national prevalence of sexual harassment, says Michele Decker, director of the women’s health and rights program at Johns Hopkins School of Public Health. As a result, many people have asked, “Where’s the evidence?” she says.

Now an online survey launched in January by a nonprofit called Stop Street Harassment offers some of that missing evidence. It found that 81 percent of women and 43 percent of men had experienced some form of sexual harassment during their lifetime.

Those numbers are much larger than suggested by other recent polls. Those polls used a more limited sample or narrower definitions of harassment, says Anita Raj, director of the Center on Gender Equity and Health at the University of California, San Diego, who analyzed the results of the new survey.

The new survey, on the other hand, included a larger, more nationally representative sample of men and women ages 18 and above, says Raj.

The survey also involved a broader definition of sexual harassment that includes the “continuum of experiences” that women face, she says.

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That includes verbal forms of sexual harassment, like being catcalled or whistled at or getting unwanted comments of a sexual nature. It also includes physical harassment, cyber harassment and sexual assaults.

The results, released in a report Wednesday, show that 77 percent of women had experienced verbal sexual harassment, and 51 percent had been sexually touched without their permission. About 41 percent said they had been sexually harassed online, and 27 percent said they had survived sexual assault.

The report also looked into locations where people experienced harassment. The majority of women — 66 percent — said they’d been sexually harassed in public spaces. “The public forums are where you see the more chronic experiences of sexual harassment,” says Raj. These include verbal harassment and physical harassment, like touching and groping.

However, 38 percent of women said they experienced sexual harassment at the workplace. Thirty-five percent said they had experienced it at their residence. These experiences are more likely to be assaults and the “most severe forms” of harassment, says Raj.

“The findings show that this is a pervasive problem and permeates all sectors of our lives,” says Holly Kearl, the main author of the report. “Most people who said they had experienced sexual harassment experienced it in multiple locations.”

“Sexual harassment until more recently has been viewed as part and parcel of what people experienced,” says Decker, who wasn’t involved in the survey. As a result, public health researchers don’t monitor it. “It’s often been dismissed, because it’s considered not as egregious as sexual assault or rape.”

For The Men #MeToo Has Toppled, Redemption Will Take More Than An Apology

Rape and sexual violence are closely monitored by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey. As a result, public health agencies and health workers are more aware of their prevalence and have been able to take steps to help victims and offer programs aimed at preventing sexual violence.

The Sexual Assault Epidemic No One Talks About

The new report shows that sexual harassment, too, is worth monitoring, says Decker. “We want to know that we’re responding to things that are prevalent and common, and this is showing that sexual harassment is really prevalent.”

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One of the most striking findings from the report is that there is a very clear “gender differential,” she says. While men experience sexual harassment as well, the prevalence is higher for women, as is the intensity of those experiences. It also shows that men are more frequently the perpetrators, she adds.

Kearl says she was surprised at how few of the victims confronted their harasser. Instead, they changed their own lives to avoid harassers and reduce their risks of being harassed.

“They were changing their routes or routines; they were changing jobs, or moving,” says Kearl.

The report also shows that most victims suffer from anxiety and depression as well, just like victims of sexual violence. “It shows how challenging it is to confront someone. You’d rather change your life than confront the harasser,” she says.

Raj says her own teenage daughter’s experience illustrates this. A couple of years ago, her daughter stopped walking to the public library by herself after she was harassed by a group of boys.

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“She was walking from her high school in a very privileged, affluent area, an area that most people would define as very safe,” Raj recalls. “As she was walking alone around 3 o’clock in the afternoon, there was a group of boys that started calling out to her and saying things like ‘nice hips.’ And it just made her feel so uncomfortable [that] she didn’t walk alone anymore.”

Like Raj’s daughter, most women (and men) first experience sexual harassment pretty early in life — during preteen or teenage years. “That’s really disconcerting,” says Raj.

Similarly disconcerting is the fact that most victims don’t report their experiences, says Decker. “People don’t even mention it to friends, families.” And so, sexual harassment is “thriving on the silence of women,” granting impunity to perpetrators, she says.

Some of that has been turned upside down by the #MeToo movement, because it broke that silence and made it more culturally acceptable to talk about sexual harassment.

“The next wave of this is to really understand … what are the barriers to people being able to access reporting process?” says Decker. “How can we support people who want to report this if they so choose?”

Parents And Students Express Frustration During School Safety Meeting With Trump

Feb 22, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Parents And Students Express Frustration During School Safety Meeting With Trump

One week after 17 people were shot and killed at Majory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., students and parents sat down with President Trump to discuss school safety and gun control.

Europe Saw 4-Fold Increase In Measles Cases In 2017

Feb 21, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Europe Saw 4-Fold Increase In Measles Cases In 2017

A measles vaccine, such as the one shown here from a Los Angeles clinic, is highly effective in preventing the spread of measles.

Lucy Nicholson/Reuters


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A measles vaccine, such as the one shown here from a Los Angeles clinic, is highly effective in preventing the spread of measles.

Lucy Nicholson/Reuters

Measles is highly contagious, but easily preventable with a vaccine.

However, the numbers of measles cases sharply jumped up in Europe in 2017, according to new data released by the World Health Organization.

In 2017, the disease affected 21,315 people, compared to 5,273 in 2016. Last year, 35 people died in Europe because of measles.

“Every new person affected by measles in Europe reminds us that unvaccinated children and adults, regardless of where they live, remain at risk of catching the disease and spreading it to others who may not be able to get vaccinated,” said Zsuzsanna Jakab, WHO’s Regional Director for Europe. She describes the loss of lives as a “tragedy we simply cannot accept.”

The WHO says that 15 countries in Europe saw outbreaks of 100 or more cases. Romania had the most, with 5,562, followed by Italy, with 5,006, and Ukraine, with 4,767.

“These countries have experienced a range of challenges in recent years, such as declines in overall routine immunization coverage, consistently low coverage among some marginalized groups, interruptions in vaccine supply or underperforming disease surveillance system,” the WHO report stated.

According to the BBC, Romania has a shortage of the vaccine. “It is also thought that the country’s large Roma population, who often live in severe poverty, are at particular risk of contracting and spreading the virus,” the broadcaster added.

In response to the burgeoning outbreak in Italy last year, the country made vaccines mandatory for measles and a number of other diseases for school children.

“Kids up to 6 years old won’t be accepted into nursery schools without them,” reporter Christopher Livesay told NPR. “And parents sending their children to school after that age without vaccinating them first will now face fines of up to $8,380.”

That was controversial and sparked protest. Like many other countries, some politicians in Italy have argued against the policy by referencing widely discredited research that suggests a link between vaccines and autism.

The WHO says other European countries that saw large outbreaks in 2017 are:

“Greece (967), Germany (927), Serbia (702), Tajikistan (649), France (520), the Russian Federation (408), Belgium (369), the United Kingdom (282), Bulgaria (167), Spain (152), Czechia (146) and Switzerland (105).”

As NPR’s Michaeleen Doucleff has reported, measles cases have generally seen a dramatic drop worldwide since the 1980s, from more than 4 million cases annually to less than 500,000. However, she adds that health workers have struggled to push vaccination rates past 78 percent, though they say rates of 90 to 95 percent are needed to stop outbreaks.

Poor countries such as Guinea, Mongolia and Nigeria are seeing a high number of cases, she adds. As NPR’s Jason Beaubien reports, Rohingya camps in Bangladesh have also seen recent outbreaks.

There have also been several recent outbreaks in the U.S., primarily impacting people who were never vaccinated for measles. The U.S. saw 118 cases of measles in 2017, according to the CDC. A 2015 outbreak across multiple states is believed to have originated with a traveler who visited Disneyland.

An outbreak hit Minnesota in 2017, sickening at least 79 people. A large number of those impacted are members of the Somali-American community in Minneapolis, many of whom are wary of vaccines.

Patients with measles have symptoms such as fever, cough and runny nose at the onset, according to the CDC. After about 3 days, a rash of “flat red spots” appears on the infected person’s body.

Search for Buried Treasure Linked to Illinois Man’s Death At Yellowstone

Feb 21, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Search for Buried Treasure Linked to Illinois Man’s Death At Yellowstone

An Illinois man was looking for buried treasure when he fell to his death at Yellowstone National Park last June. Here, bison graze just inside the park near Gardiner, Mont., in 2011.

Ted S. Warren/AP


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An Illinois man was looking for buried treasure when he fell to his death at Yellowstone National Park last June. Here, bison graze just inside the park near Gardiner, Mont., in 2011.

Ted S. Warren/AP

Last summer, 53-year-old Jeff Murphy was hiking in Yellowstone National Park when he disappeared. Park investigators found his body on June 9, where Murphy had fallen 500 feet from Turkey Pen Peak, after accidentally stepping into a chute.

But he wasn’t on just any hike. He was looking for a treasure box of gold and jewels worth up to $2 million, buried somewhere in the Rocky Mountains by an eccentric millionaire named Forrest Fenn.

Seeking Adventure And Gold? Crack This Poem And Head Outdoors

Fenn, an art dealer and millionaire in his 80s, lives in Santa Fe, N.M. In his self-published memoir, Fenn included a poem that supposedly leads to the treasure he hid in the mountains.

“The ornate, Romanesque box is 10-by-10 inches and weighs about 40 pounds when loaded,” NPR’s John Burnett reported in 2016. “Fenn has only revealed that it is hidden in the Rocky Mountains, somewhere between Santa Fe and the Canadian border at an elevation above 5,000 feet. It’s not in a mine, a graveyard or near a structure.”

Murphy is the fourth man to die while searching for the chest.

While his death was reported at the time, it wasn’t clear until NBC affiliate KULR obtained a copy of the park’s investigation that Murphy was looking for Fenn’s treasure when he died.

“The report shows that Murphy emailed Forrest Fenn in the days before Murphy’s death,” KULR reports. “It also shows emails from Fenn to Yellowstone officials during the search. The man who invited people to look for his chest of gold and jewels in the Rockies was very concerned about Murphy, and also offered to help pay for a helicopter to find the missing man. He also wrote that he had never been to the area where Murphy fell.”

Linda Bilyeu, whose former husband died searching for the treasure in January 2016, told NBC News that the hunt was “ludicrous” and “should be stopped.”

After the death of 52-year-old Paris Wallace, also last June, Fenn posted additional clues to a treasure-seekers’ blog, apparently with the hope of preventing people from searching in unnecessarily dangerous locations.

“The treasure chest is not under water, nor is it near the Rio Grande River,” he wrote. “It is not necessary to move large rocks or climb up or down a steep precipice, and it is not under a man-made object.”

He was about 80 when he hid the treasure, he reminded the seekers, and he had to make two trips from his vehicle.

“Please be cautious and don’t take risks,” Fenn wrote. “The search is supposed to be fun.”

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