Browsing articles in "News from US"

3 Sweet Reads For August’s Hot Days

Aug 18, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on 3 Sweet Reads For August’s Hot Days


Ghosted

Summer is still in full swing, and that calls for binging on totally absorbing and heartwarming romances. These three novels — full of mystery, adventure and love — deliver a perfect escape and a satisfying happy ever after.

It’s happened to so many women: they have a fantastic connection with a guy and then he disappears. No calls, no texts, just … gone. Rosie Walsh’s Ghosted takes this premise and refuses to let it go, in a gripping and surprising romantic suspense story.


The Long Way Around, by Quinn Anderson

Sarah and Eddie meet on a remote country road in England and connect instantly. They share one perfect week together, and then he vanishes — he’s ghosted her. Despite her friends’ skepticism, Sarah is certain that 1) what they shared was real and thus 2) something happened to Eddie. First, the clues start appearing — Eddie’s presence on social media, warnings from his friends and a few weird appearances from a mysterious stranger. Then, the story takes a surprising turn. This novel is, at heart, a love story between a man and a woman, between families struggling after tragedy, and the truth that connects them all. You won’t want to put it down.

For a sweet friends-to-lovers road trip romance, don’t miss The Long Way Around by Quinn Anderson. Sam Cooper and Wesley Reed met as roommates freshman year of college and their ongoing friendship has been a testament that two gay men can be just friends … Until Sam has to return home to Montana for his sister’s wedding — and face his parents after calling off his own wedding at the last minute. (Just a little nerve-wracking!) Of course his bestie, Wes, will be by his side, vintage car and all, for the great American road trip.


The Vixen

It’s not a question of if but when these guys will get together. Their chemistry is undeniable, and their story gets very sexy in the parking lot of a brewery outside of Atlanta and takes a turn for the serious somewhere around Texas. It’s not an entirely smooth road; Wes has a secret that will put their friendship and their budding romance to the test. A lot of growing up happens on the way to the wedding — and their happily ever after.

Christi Caldwell’s The Vixen shows readers a darker, grittier version of Regency London than most romance novels. Ophelia Killoran and Connor Steele have a long history together — ever since they were both children trying to survive on the streets. After a lucky twist of fate, Connor was taken in by a wealthy earl who gave him a life of ease and privilege. When he runs into Olivia again as an adult, he’s investigating the disappearances of a peer’s son and she — still haunting the streets — possesses information he needs.

Whether in back alleys or London ballrooms, Ophelia and Connor keep running into each other, and romance starts to blossom in spite of devastating secrets, being on opposite sides of the law and some majorly devious family meddling. Caldwell’s more realistic version of London is a particularly gripping backdrop for this enemies-to-lovers romance, and it’s heartening to read a story where love triumphs even in the darkest places.

Maya Rodale is a best-selling romance author.

Aretha Franklin Knew How To Make Us Laugh, Too

Aug 18, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Aretha Franklin Knew How To Make Us Laugh, Too

Aretha Franklin was in her element with comedians John Belushi and Dan Aykroyd on the set of The Blues Brothers.

Sunset Boulevard/Corbis via Getty Images


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Aretha Franklin was in her element with comedians John Belushi and Dan Aykroyd on the set of The Blues Brothers.

Sunset Boulevard/Corbis via Getty Images

The late, great Aretha Franklin delivered world-class soul ballads like “Ain’t No Way” that plumbed the depths of romantic experience and made it feel as if your heart had been squeezed dry like a defeated sponge. Her brazen self-determination anthems, including “Think” and “Respect,” were electrically-charged lightning bolts of funk that emblematized the movement politics of the turbulent 1960s and ’70s. The Queen of Soul was a goosebumps-generating singer capable of making weighty music about loss and love and the vicissitudes of life.

She could also be a bit of a hoot.

'Black People Will Be Free': How Aretha Lived The Promise Of Detroit

Friends and family have long reported how Aretha — who tended to carry herself with a regal going-to-church, Sunday Best composure — possessed a penchant for deadpan wisecracks. As reported in David Ritz’s unauthorized 2014 biography Respect: The Life of Aretha Franklin, Aretha undercut her default aloofness with an elbow-in-the-rib every now and then. For example: She loved to pepper her live concert act with comedic vocal impressions of artists like Diana Ross, Sarah Vaughan, Dionne Warwick and Della Reese.

In the 1970s, Aretha regularly guested on TV’s variety hour The Flip Wilson Show, where she repeated those impressions. In one endearing episode, Aretha shares the piano stool with Wilson, and the two go back and forth in an off-the-cuff comedic tête-à-tête. Aretha, while slightly reserved, seemed totally at ease playing for laughs: We’d see her go there again during a convivial cameo on Candice Bergen’s TV smash Murphy Brown.

Aretha’s brassy appearance in John Landis’ eternal 1980 comedy The Blues Brothers forever endeared her to successive generations of frat bros, and she returned 20 years later to sing “Respect” in the sequel, Blues Brothers 2000. With just a handful of significant acting roles (she also had a walk-on part in the early ’70s docu-fiction series Room 222), we can only speculate about an alternative future in which Aretha spent more time exercising her comedy chops.

In these cases, Aretha’s humor was intentional and deliberate. At other times, we were laughing at the gap between her intended objective and the final outcome — like in the 2010s, when social media smart alecks started overdubbing Aretha’s interview clips and using them as fodder in viral web series like Got 2B Real. Whatever the case, Aretha’s joviality took diverse forms: she could be joyful, downright sassy, droll, bawdy, insouciant, diva-campy, and so much more. None of it ever diminished her regal status as the Queen of Soul. Instead, it was just the opposite: Aretha’s high-spirited abandon made her seem much more accessible, down-home and charismatic.

Aretha’s underrated songwriting, for example, is full of good-humored sistagirl camp. There’s no shortage of recorded examples of Aretha getting feisty, especially if a desirable man was involved. 1967’s steam-heat classic “Dr. Feelgood (Love Is a Serious Business)” is a perfect example: She breaks the news to her girlfriends that since her man is on his way and she’s about to get it on, she doesn’t have the time “to sit and chit and sit and chit-chat and smile.” That same sassy attitude is also the driving force behind her proto-feminist flip of Otis Redding’s “Respect,” especially when it comes to Aretha and her background-singing sisters’ slang imperatives, like “sock it to me” and “take care, TCB” (taking care of business). Of course, these songs also evince Aretha’s other emotional priorities, too — defiance, assertiveness, self-satisfaction — but we can’t discount the exhilarating mirth that undergirds them.

Neck-poppin’, finger-snappin’ fierceness is also in full effect on 1982’s Luther Vandross-produced “Jump to It.” In recounting the recording session in Ritz’s 2014 biography, Vandross says that Aretha improvised the song’s monologue about her best girlfriend Kitty “dishing the dirt on who drop-kicked who.” Just like in the earlier “Dr. Feelgood,” Aretha’s ready, on a moment’s notice, to ditch her pal for a hot man whom she’ll “jump to.” “Girl, I got to go!” she merrily blurts out. In moments like these, we’re reminded that Aretha came from of a long line of sharp-tongued blues mamas who used ribald humor to maximum effect.

There’s also Aretha’s playful jive talk on the Narada Michael Walden-produced “Freeway of Love” when she tells her man “So drop the top baby / And let’s cruise on into this better than ever street.” The story of her hit “Who’s Zoomin’ Who?” is even funnier. Trying to come up with ideas for the song, co-producer Walden asked Aretha to name her strategies for relaxation. Her sassy response had to do with spotting a cute man at a club: “I might look his way, he might look mine, and just when he thinks the fish is about to take the bait, the fish jumps off the line and he’s wondering, ‘Baby, who’s zooming who.'” Inspired by The Queen of Soul’s impromptu humor, Walden and co-composer Preston Glass used her exact phrases to devise the lyric, and Aretha is naturally co-credited as a songwriter.

Aretha’s playful zest wasn’t just limited to lyrics. In the mid-1970s, the soul icon started making increasingly outlandish fashion choices. At Jimmy Carter’s 1977 Presidential inauguration gala, for example, Aretha rockets through tunes “Rock with Me” and “Perdido” wearing a red sparkling dress with a fur mane that looks like it might have once been responsible for strangling someone. Aretha’s style emergencies continued unabated for the next four decades, earning her the enduring wrath of fashion police — but also, I’d imagine, their secret admiration. As easy (and maybe sexist) as it is to mock Aretha’s predilection for idiosyncratic style, her true fans always loved her for being so boldly, wackily, unapologetically herself. In the 2014 David Ritz bio, Aretha’s late sister Carolyn says this of Aretha’s fashion choices:

“I think there’s a method to her madness. … Her wild stage outfits bring her even more attention … You may not like what she’s wearing, but you’ll notice what she has on. The first rule of a long-lasting diva like Aretha is always You will not ignore me.”

Aretha had many other whimsical quirks, most of which are also reported in the 2014 Ritz biography: For such a regal figure, she was also a sofa-grazing soap opera fanatic, reportedly transfixed on The Young and the Restless; at one point, she even tried her hand at writing a script. And once, at a Friars Club roast of Arista boss Clive Davis, Aretha sported a ballet tutu and started twirling about with a troupe from the City Center Ballet Company. Apparently, Aretha hadn’t intended the outfit or the dancing to be humorous, but hey.

As she got older, in and around the 2000s, Aretha morphed into the archetype of a zero-f**** grandma, seemingly not caring what anyone thought about her, and refusing to modify her sometimes kooky behavior to suit social conventions. I recall witnessing audiences chuckle at public events when she’d bring her luxe handbag on stage and park it at her side. (Biographer Ritz says it’s because she was worried about having her funds, which were paid to her in cash at these events, stolen; she learned the strategy from James Brown.) Aretha will never be forgotten for her hilariously self-indulgent, four-and-a-half minute rendition of the National Anthem before a very patient audience at a 2016 Lions and Vikings Thanksgiving game.

The Jazz Side Of The Soul Queen

In some ways, Aretha Franklin has always been a bit of a comedy icon on the low. In 2015, when asked by a Wall Street Journal reporter to opine about the talent of Taylor Swift, Aretha could only muster up the rather shady “great gowns, beautiful gowns.” Twenty-first century Aretha became infamous with the millennial set thanks to the unfiltered facial expressions she’d make during televised interviews that could so easily be turned into LOL-inducing GIFs. And let’s not forget that YouTube clip of Aretha hamming it up on a spirited, winking live concert cover of Mariah Carey’s suggestive “Touch My Body.”

Aretha’s long history of much-publicized diva squabbles — especially with peer superstars like Natalie Cole and Gladys Knight — is part and parcel of her celebrity. Aretha’s fans relished such melodramatic lore in spades. The flipside of those battles has to do with Aretha’s less savory sides, thoughtfully explored in the 2014 Ritz biography: she appeared to be insecure, competitive and ruled by a lack of self-scrutiny and a fear of losing control. Toward the end of her life, riddled with a type of pancreatic cancer, Aretha supposedly stated that she didn’t want anyone, even her close friends, to know the details of her suffering, even on her deathbed.

Ironically, then, for an icon so bent on keeping control, Aretha had little trouble letting go and taking immense creative risks during her live performances, more so than most other RB singers of her generation. Those risks, where she’s often throwing caution to the wind and teetering right at the edge of disaster, were part of what made The Queen such an exhilarating and fun performer, rather than a stiff or imperial one.

Once, sporting a ginormous beehive-style hairdo at the 1968 Democratic National Convention, Aretha sang the National Anthem, but comically flubbed the words. Year later, in 2008, Barack Obama altered history as the first biracial, black man to become elected to the highest office in the land; Aretha Franklin, as usual, was center stage at this world-historical event, singing “My Country, ‘Tis of Thee.” NPR’s Ann Powers already smartly deconstructed the Queen of Soul’s iconic performance that day. But what’s notable is that Aretha chose to sing the song live in the blistering January cold — frosty weather can immobilize the vocal cords — rather than to lip sync as most singers might elect to do. In an interview, Aretha explained that singing live — no matter how risky — felt like the right choice in that monumental moment. Beyond the singing, what many people remember about that performance is Aretha’s gray hat, replete with an astonishing fashion don’t: an oversize bow in the front. It was Baptist church finery mixed with campy British royal wedding chic!

There are two other standout performances that capture Aretha’s trademark mixture of daffiness and audacity. At the 1998 Grammy Awards, iconic classical tenor Luciano Pavarotti backed out of his live telecast performance of the Puccini aria “Nessun Dorma” at the very last minute. Aretha, attending the award ceremony that night, got wind of Pavarotti’s absence. Since she’d performed the aria at a previous event, she volunteered to wing it live with no orchestra rehearsal. While Aretha’s triumphant, rendition of the Italian aria resulted in endless debates about the quality of her singing and whether she’d stretched herself too far trying to sing opera, her version stands as one of the most heroic, jaw-dropping live television performances in history. It also happens to be chuckle-worthy, because Aretha bends the operatic showstopper toward her inimitable soulful style and still comes out swinging at the end, punching her hands up to the sky on the aria’s famous last word: “Vincerò,” which translates from Italian as “I will win!”

In 2015, legendary songwriter Carole King received the Kennedy Center Honor; at the ceremony, Aretha paid tribute to King by performing “(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman,” which King co-wrote. In the telecast video, King shakes in joy watching Aretha tackle her iconic ballad, and President Obama visibly sheds a tear himself. The highlight happens mid-way through the song, when Aretha, sporting a luxurious fur coat, rises from the piano, and delivers the song center stage. Wailing out of the bridge, she flings the fur coat to the floor, like a haughty aristocrat, moved by the spirit of the moment.

Naturally, the audience erupts in applause, in praise of Aretha’s innate sense of drama, and her ability to bask in fearless self-satisfaction. What also makes the moment so special is that septuagenarian Aretha, exposing her bare arms and shoulders, not only confirms her sexy womanhood, but she confirms for us, by doing something only a much younger ingénue would dare to do, that she would never capitulate to age. That Kennedy Center performance remains one of Aretha’s most winning live moments because it truly reminds us that she’s a regal soul survivor, happy to perform her Queendom in a way that is idiosyncratically, authentically her. While there’s nothing goofy or intentionally humorous about the performance, it’s yet another example of her penchant to go for an implicitly campy diva moment in the midst of an arch-serious historical event. Only Aretha could make it work.

What Aretha’s lifetime of freewheeling exuberance demonstrates is that the best soul music is rooted in an artistic commitment to creative spontaneity, and a desire to turn every performance into an improvisational singularity that can never be repeated the same way twice. Skill, command and exceptional accomplishment are what we came to expect of any given Aretha Franklin performance. But that she sometimes delivered those heroic performance with an ebullient sense of cheeky abandon and vital exuberance … that’s really what it means to stop the show.

Florida Gov. Rick Scott Has Convoluted Ties To Rail Company Whose Project He Supports

Aug 17, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Florida Gov. Rick Scott Has Convoluted Ties To Rail Company Whose Project He Supports

The company behind a privately funded passenger train line in Florida has proposed a route that connects Orlando and Tampa. Here, a Brightline train is seen at the new MiamiCentral terminal during its inaugural trip from Miami to West Palm Beach in May.

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The company behind a privately funded passenger train line in Florida has proposed a route that connects Orlando and Tampa. Here, a Brightline train is seen at the new MiamiCentral terminal during its inaugural trip from Miami to West Palm Beach in May.

Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Seven years ago, Florida Gov. Rick Scott killed a federally funded project to build a high-speed train between Tampa and Orlando.

Scott now supports the idea of a similar train route — fueled by private investment instead. And the governor and his wife have invested millions of dollars with a company that stands to profit off such a project, as first reported by the Miami Herald.

The Scotts’ investment is not directly tied to the rail project, and a spokeswoman for Scott says he would not personally profit from the proposal’s success.

Scott is currently running for the U.S. Senate. That campaign required him to release the financial disclosures the Herald relied on in its reporting.

Millions invested in a Fortress fund

The Scotts are multimillionaires. Much of their fortune is controlled by Ann Scott, while the funds in Rick Scott’s name are held in a blind trust.

More than $3 million of the couple’s wealth is invested in a credit fund for Fortress Investment Group, most of it via trusts held by Ann Scott. Fortress also owns the train company that has proposed building a line from Orlando to Tampa.

To be more precise: Fortress owns Florida East Coast Industries, which owns All Aboard Florida, which operates a train project called Brightline. On its website, Fortress is currently featuring the launch of Brightline as one of its “investment highlights.”

Brightline says it is “the only privately owned, operated and maintained passenger rail system in the United States.” The line currently runs between Miami and West Palm Beach, and the company is building an extension to Orlando. This spring, Brightline made an unsolicited proposal for a rail service between Orlando and Tampa.

A spokeswoman for Scott’s Senate campaign emphasized that the Scotts invested in “an unrelated debt-financing fund” operated by a separate division of Fortress.

“As such, the success or failure of All Aboard Florida or any rail project within the State of Florida will have no effect on this investment,” Lauren Schenone told NPR via email.

Fortress Investment Group managing director Gordon E. Runté told the Herald that the fund the Scotts have invested in “is not providing financing for unrelated projects, including Brightline.”

‘I put my assets in a blind trust so I wouldn’t have any conflicts’

Scott’s federal financial disclosure forms reveal that his blind trust has more than $500,000 invested in a Fortress Secured Lending Fund, while his wife has more than $2.5 million invested.

The actual amount could be far higher; two of the investments are identified simply as being more than $1 million, with no other details. The Scotts earned more than $165,000 in income from those investments.

Between their various trusts, the couple has hundreds of lucrative investments; Scott’s financial disclosure form is 125 pages long.

Asked about the Herald‘s report at a press conference in Jacksonville, Fla., on Friday, Gov. Scott emphasized that he does not control his own assets.

“When I got elected back in 2010 I put my assets in a blind trust so I wouldn’t have any conflicts,” he said. “I went and put myself in a position that I didn’t know what I had investments in, I didn’t make investments, I didn’t buy assets, I didn’t sell assets … I don’t know what’s in those investments.”

He did not address his wife’s investments; asked by NPR about Ann Scott’s investments, Schenone said that the first lady of Florida is not an elected official.

Other ties to All Aboard Florida

The Miami Herald also notes that All Aboard Florida, the company that operates Brightline, donated more than $188,000 to Scott’s campaign in 2010, and that it donated another $25,000 to his inauguration.

In 2014, when Scott backed an airport train depot project that would be a boost to All Aboard Florida, The Associated Press reported that Scott had a personal — or rather, a personnel — tie to the company.

The governor’s then-chief of staff had previously been employed by a subsidiary of Florida East Coast Industries, the parent company of All Aboard Florida.

The AP acquired text messages that showed he discussed the rail project with a Scott aide while he was still employed by that affiliated company.

Scott: Obama proposal was ‘a bad deal’

When Scott killed the Tampa-Orlando high-speed rail project in 2011, he turned down $2.4 billion in federal funds. He has maintained there is no inconsistency in his support for a private train line now and his rejection of a federally funded plan seven years ago.

The original proposal was “horrible for our state the way it was set up,” Scott said in Jacksonville on Friday. “California took the money, Connecticut took the money … there’s delays, it cost more than what they thought, those projects are not getting done.”

The project did not call for any Florida funds to be spent, but Scott expressed concern that it could put the state on the hook for expenses in the future. He also said the project “offers far too little long-term benefit.”

The federally funded train project had bipartisan support in Florida, Time magazine reported in 2011. But there were questions about how much demand there would be for a train running between Orlando and Tampa — aside from tourists looking to visit Walt Disney World.

Scott did not express reservations about ridership in June, when he praised the idea of a private line between the cities.

Scott issued a press release announcing that the state was inviting companies to submit proposals for that route — a move made in response to the unsolicited proposal from Brightline.

The governor called private high-speed rail between Orlando to Tampa “an exciting opportunity” for the state, as opposed to the “bad deal” from the Obama administration’s plan.

“Instead of placing taxpayers on the hook for hundreds of millions of dollars, our goal is for the private sector to invest in this project,” Scott said. “Through private investment, we ensure that this major project has zero financial risk to Florida taxpayers.”

Fighting In All 50 States: ‘America Invaded’ Explores Incursion’s Impact On The U.S.

Aug 17, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Fighting In All 50 States: ‘America Invaded’ Explores Incursion’s Impact On The U.S.

Inspired by his own road trip through 36 states, author Christopher Kelly is out with the book “America Invaded: A State by State Guide to Fighting on American Soil.” The book provides a snapshot of the waves of invasion that have touched all 50 American states.

Here Now‘s Lisa Mullins talks with Kelly about the inspiration behind the book.

Are You Becoming An Empty Nester? Share Your Story

Aug 16, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Are You Becoming An Empty Nester? Share Your Story

Summer is not over yet, but many parents are getting ready to send their kids off to college. Is your last child moving out of the house to go to college?If so, NPR's Morning Edition wants to hear from you.

Summer is not over yet, but many parents are getting ready to send their kids off to college. Is your last child moving out of the house to go to college?If so, NPR's Morning Edition wants to hear from you.

Summer is not over yet, but many parents are getting ready to send their kids off to college.

It’s one of those major turning points in life, not just for kids but also for parents, especially those are who are saying goodbye to their last or only child: They are about to become empty nesters.

Is your last child moving out of the house to go to college? If so, NPR’s Morning Edition wants to hear from you. Please share your story with us below, or here. An NPR producer may follow up with you.

Climate Change Debate And Denial Dates Back Further Than You Might Think

Aug 16, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Climate Change Debate And Denial Dates Back Further Than You Might Think

Although climate change is still a relatively new phrase to many, its debate and denial in the U.S. stretches back a long time.

Here Now’s Robin Young talks about the history of climate change with Brian Balogh (@historyfellow) and Nathan Connolly (@ndbconnolly), historians and co-hosts of the podcast “BackStory,” which is produced at Virginia Humanities.

2018 Revealed Just How Ill-Prepared We Are For Climate Change

Aug 15, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on 2018 Revealed Just How Ill-Prepared We Are For Climate Change

Somini Sengupta, international climate reporter for The New York Times, discusses the dire consequences of rising temperatures, such as drought, famine, disease, war and increased migration.

Turkey Counterpunches By Raising Tariffs On U.S. Goods

Aug 15, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Turkey Counterpunches By Raising Tariffs On U.S. Goods

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan speaks during a news conference Tuesday at the presidential palace in Ankara.

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Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan speaks during a news conference Tuesday at the presidential palace in Ankara.

Burhan Ozbilici/AP

Just days after President Trump tweeted his decision to double tariffs on Turkish steel and aluminum, Turkey has announced that it, too, is ratcheting up retaliatory tariffs.

“Tax rates on imports of some products have been increased on a reciprocal basis against the U.S. administration’s deliberate attacks on our economy,” the country’s vice president, Fuat Oktay, said in a pair of tweets.

What's The Deal With The Deepening Dispute Between U.S. And Turkey?

The order published in Turkey’s official gazette and signed by its strongman president, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, raises tariffs on a wide range of U.S. goods — more than tripling the levies on automobiles, nuts and spirits, and more than doubling them on rice, beauty products and certain types of paper.

These increases affect a list of more than 20 goods, which Ankara first targeted earlier this summer in retaliation for the Trump administration’s broad tariffs on imported steel and aluminum. Then last week, Trump increased them to 50 percent on Turkish steel and 20 percent on Turkish aluminum.

The escalating feud between the longtime NATO allies is playing out against a backdrop of economic tumult in Turkey, which has seen steep drops in the country’s currency, the lira.

As NPR explained in a primer on the dispute, much of the ill will shared by Turkey and the U.S. stems not only from the back-and-forth on tariffs, but also from a diplomatic dust-up centered on two men of faith.

The U.S. wants American evangelical pastor Andrew Brunson freed and cleared of terrorism-related charges he has faced since 2016, when Turkish authorities arrested him for allegedly aiding a failed coup attempt earlier that year. Brunson is now on trial and held on house arrest, with few indications that Turkish officials intend to comply with the demands — despite U.S. sanctions that were leveled against them two weeks ago.

Erdogan wants Washington to extradite Turkish cleric and scholar Fethullah Gulen, whom the Turkish president views as a longtime antagonist and mastermind of the plot to oust him. Gulen has denied the charges, and the U.S. has rejected every request to force him from his compound in Pennsylvania to stand trial in Turkey.

That hasn’t prevented Turkish officials from continuing to press their perceived leverage in Brunson.

“If the traitor in Pennsylvania is extradited to our country, the handover of the pastor may be in the offing, and both countries will get what they want,” Devlet Bahceli, leader of a far-right political party allied with Erdogan, said Wednesday in Ankara, according to the Anadolu news agency.

All the while, the lira has plummeted — even reaching a record low against the U.S. dollar early Monday before managing modest rallies in the following days. And while many global economists peg the currency’s troubles to a combination of debt, inflation and Erdogan’s vow to reject raising interest rates — a typical solution to these problems — Erdogan himself has found a ready villain: the U.S.

“You work with us in Afghanistan, Somalia and NATO, and then you go stab your partner in the back,” he said earlier this week. “You call this acceptable?”

On Tuesday, Erdogan called for a boycott of U.S. electronics products, and his spokesperson described American policy as goading Turkey into an “economic war.”

“Turkey isn’t in favor of an economic war,” Ibrahim Kalin said Wednesday, “but staying silent when attacked is out of question.”

Trump Campaign Targets Omarosa Manigault Newman Over Tell-All Book

Aug 14, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Trump Campaign Targets Omarosa Manigault Newman Over Tell-All Book

The Trump campaign claims that former aide Omarosa Manigault Newman violated an agreement she signed not to disparage Trump or disclose proprietary information.

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The Trump campaign claims that former aide Omarosa Manigault Newman violated an agreement she signed not to disparage Trump or disclose proprietary information.

Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Updated at 1:58 p.m. ET

President Trump’s campaign arm has filed a complaint with an arbitrator, accusing former White House staffer Omarosa Manigault Newman of violating a 2016 confidentiality agreement with her tell-all book and publicity tour.

In her book, Unhinged, and the accompanying tour, Manigault Newman has been harshly critical of the president, calling Trump a racist and suggesting that he suffers from dementia.

The president launched a volley of angry tweets in response, describing his former aide as a “crazed, crying lowlife,” and “that dog.”

Now, the Trump campaign is taking legal action.

In Presidential Tweet, Trump Says Former Aide Was 'A Loser' And 'Vicious'

Omarosa Tells NPR She Heard Trump 'N-Word Tape,' Contradicting Her Own Tell-All Book

“Donald J. Trump for President, Inc. has filed an arbitration against Omarosa Manigault Newman,” said a campaign official in a statement. The claim accuses the former staffer of violating an agreement she signed before joining the 2016 campaign, in which she reportedly promised not to disparage Trump or disclose proprietary information.

The campaign did not elaborate on the nature of the alleged violation.

Manigault Newman, who became famous while appearing alongside Trump on The Apprentice TV show, later made secret recordings of the president and others. She has shared some of those tapes during her book tour.

She also accused Trump of using a racial slur during production of The Apprentice, a charge that initially surfaced during the 2016 campaign.

Trump Thanks Omarosa Manigault Newman After White House Announces Her Resignation

Trump has denied that claim, citing a conversation he had with Apprentice creator Mark Burnett.

Burnett “called to say that there are NO TAPES of the Apprentice where I used such a terrible and disgusting word as attributed by Wacky and Deranged Omarosa,” Trump tweeted Monday night. “I don’t have that word in my vocabulary and never have. She made it up.”

Manigault-Newman’s attorney, John Phillips, said he had not yet seen the Trump campaign’s complaint.

“At this time, we haven’t seen any legal action and don’t have a comment on it,” said John Phillips. “Her legal team will address these matters appropriately when they arise.”

Trump had a long history in his business and political career of using non-disclosure agreements to protect secrets and keep subordinates quiet. He successfully sued a Miss Universe contestant for $5 million in 2013 for publicly complaining that the beauty pageant was rigged.

Through attorney Michael Cohen, Trump also sought to silence adult film actress Stephanie Clifford. Cohen paid Clifford $130,000 to keep quiet about a sexual encounter she claimed to have have had with Trump. (Clifford has since argued that agreement was non-binding.)

Earlier this year, the Washington Post reported that Trump sought confidentiality agreements from senior White House staffers. The newspaper cited a draft agreement which included a $10 million penalty for violators. A White House spokesman disputed the dollar figure but otherwise declined to comment.

Andy Biskin And 16 Tons Revisit ‘Songs From The Alan Lomax Collection’

Aug 14, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Andy Biskin And 16 Tons Revisit ‘Songs From The Alan Lomax Collection’

Early in his career, clarinetist Andy Biskin worked as an assistant to the folklorist Alan Lomax. Biskin’s new album features new settings of songs drawn from Lomax’s The Folk Songs of North America.

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  • NPT: 2018-08-19 09:16 PM
  • EDT: 2018-08-19 11:31 AM
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