Browsing articles from "April, 2019"

Sudan Military Rulers Meet With Opposition Leaders Who Demand A Transition Of Power

Apr 30, 2019   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Sudan Military Rulers Meet With Opposition Leaders Who Demand A Transition Of Power

Demonstrators in Sudan continue protests in front of the military headquarters in Khartoum as opposition leaders meet with military rulers to discuss a handover to civilian power.

Wayne LaPierre Re-Elected As NRA Leader Amid Internal Turmoil And Outside Probe

Apr 30, 2019   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Wayne LaPierre Re-Elected As NRA Leader Amid Internal Turmoil And Outside Probe

National Rifle Association Executive Vice President Wayne LaPierre faced criticism from the group’s board members as allegations about financial mismanagement surfaced.

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National Rifle Association Executive Vice President Wayne LaPierre faced criticism from the group’s board members as allegations about financial mismanagement surfaced.

Michael Conroy/AP

The National Rifle Association’s board reelected Wayne LaPierre as its executive vice president and CEO Monday, amid turmoil within the organization.

An announcement in the American Rifleman, the official magazine of the NRA, said that LaPierre’s reelection was unanimous and unopposed. Carolyn Meadows, a member of the board, was selected to be the next president of the gun rights group.

The public show of unity came after a dramatic weekend at the NRA’s annual meeting. NRA President Oliver North announced abruptly that he would not be seeking another term at his post, as is customary — and warned of a “crisis” at the organization due to allegations of financial misconduct.

Then LaPierre was challenged at the annual membership meeting when a resolution calling for his ouster was offered. After a passionate debate by NRA members, the resolution failed.

These developments took place after numerous media reports have alleged financial mismanagement by senior officials. The drama was not unnoticed — even the president, a staunch supporter of the NRA, warned the group to get its act together.

“It must get its act together quickly, stop the internal fighting, get back to GREATNESS – FAST!” Trump said in a tweet.

Senior leaders in the organization have pledged that they will get to the bottom of allegations of financial misconduct.

“We’ve got to do what is right by our members because we are the voice of the members,” said former U.S. Rep. Allen West, a member of the board of directors. “And I think it’s very important that we put in the right type of organizational reforms that are necessary if we do find that there has been financial malfeasance — and then we’ve got to report it back to the members. That’s it.”

WATCH: March For Our Lives Releases PSA As 2020 Gun Debate Heats Up

“The NRA board … has a very important fiduciary responsibility to ensure that funds that are received are spent, accounted for properly, and in accord with all applicable laws and regulations,” said Bob Barr, another member of the NRA’s board of directors. “That’s the challenge that the NRA has like any large organization. … It’s always a challenge. And this case is no different.”

Some members had expressed hope that LaPierre would step aside as part of reforms to deal with allegations of financial misconduct. He has been the executive vice president of the NRA since 1991.

“I don’t know a single organization in the United States that has a vice president that has served for that long. And to not own up to those failures that his organization has is a failure of leadership,” said Ron Carter, an NRA member from Colorado Springs, Colo., who supported the resolution to oust LaPierre. “So he should absolutely step down or be removed.”

As NRA Leadership Fight Spills Into Public, N.Y. Attorney General Opens Investigation

The NRA has also been facing multiple investigations into its internal matters. A number of congressional committees have sought and received documents from the group. And over the weekend, the office of New York’s attorney general, Letitia James, confirmed to NPR that it had launched an investigation into the NRA.

The investigation by the attorney general represents a unique threat to the organization. The NRA was chartered in New York, and the attorney general has the ability and responsibility to oversee nonprofits in the state.

The president weighed in on the investigation, arguing on Twitter that the NRA “should leave and fight from the outside of this very difficult to deal with (unfair) State!”

But such a move would be logistically difficult — if not impossible. And even if the NRA moved out of New York, it would still be under the state attorney general’s purview unless it ceased operating in the state entirely.

“The powers of the AG extend to any entity doing business in the state as well as those created under its laws,” said Beth Kingsley, a lawyer who specializes in nonprofit law.

The probe by James is especially serious because if she finds wrongdoing her office can punish a nonprofit by removing its board of directors, forcing them to repay money wrongfully obtained — or even, in an extreme case, force an organization to cease operations or dissolve.

FBI Says It Thwarted A Planned Terrorist Attack By A Man In Los Angeles Area

Apr 30, 2019   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on FBI Says It Thwarted A Planned Terrorist Attack By A Man In Los Angeles Area

U.S. Attorney Nick Hanna stands next to photos of Mark Steven Domingo during a news conference in Los Angeles on Monday. Federal prosecutors said Domingo had planned to bomb a white supremacist rally as retribution for the New Zealand mosque attacks but was thwarted.

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U.S. Attorney Nick Hanna stands next to photos of Mark Steven Domingo during a news conference in Los Angeles on Monday. Federal prosecutors said Domingo had planned to bomb a white supremacist rally as retribution for the New Zealand mosque attacks but was thwarted.

Richard Vogel/AP

A U.S. Army veteran with experience fighting in Afghanistan conspired to stage a terrorist attack on a planned white supremacist rally with the intent of inflicting mass casualties in the Los Angeles area, according to federal prosecutors.

Mark Steven Domingo, 26, was arrested last Friday after he received what he believed was a live bomb that he intended to detonate at a Long Beach rally scheduled for Sunday. In fact, the supposed improvised explosive device was delivered to Domingo by an undercover law enforcement officer.

Domingo is charged with providing and attempting to provide material support to terrorists.

According to an affidavit, Domingo actively discussed with an FBI informant the possibility of attacking several possible sites, targeting Jews, police officers, churches and a National Guard armory before settling on the Long Beach rally.

In online posts, Domingo expressed his support for violent jihad. “America needs another vegas event … something to kick off civil unrest,” he wrote on March 3. That was an apparent reference to the Oct. 1, 2017, mass shooting in Las Vegas, in which the perpetrator killed 58 people before killing himself.

Domingo also expressed a desire to avenge the March 15 mass shootings at two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, in which 50 people were killed. “There must be retribution,” he wrote, according to the affidavit.

Domingo had been deployed to Afghanistan between September 2012 and January 2013.

Mark Steven Domingo, 26, in an undated California Department of Motor Vehicles photo released by the U.S. Justice Department.

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Mark Steven Domingo, 26, in an undated California Department of Motor Vehicles photo released by the U.S. Justice Department.

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Domingo allegedly purchased 8 pounds of 3-inch nails for the planned IED because, he said, “they would be long enough to penetrate the human body and puncture internal organs,” according to the affidavit.

At one stage of their plotting, according to the affidavit, the informant pressed Domingo for his attack plan, stressing that he didn’t want to get caught.

“Your plan is just to go and get caught. That’s your plan,” the informant allegedly said.

Domingo allegedly replied, “Martyrdom, bro.”

Domingo was taken into custody Friday night as he, the FBI informant and the undercover officer were conducting surveillance at the Long Beach park as part of their final preparations for the planned attack.

Biden, Calling Himself A ‘Union Man,’ Kicks Off Campaign With Pennsylvania Rally

Apr 30, 2019   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on Biden, Calling Himself A ‘Union Man,’ Kicks Off Campaign With Pennsylvania Rally

Former Vice President Joe Biden kicked off his campaign calling himself “a union man.”

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Former Vice President Joe Biden kicked off his campaign calling himself “a union man.”

Keith Srakocic/AP

Former Vice President Joe Biden held his first rally in his campaign for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination on Monday, saying he is running to restore the soul of the nation and to “rebuild the backbone” of America.

Biden spoke in Pittsburgh at a rally held by the International Association of Fire Fighters, which endorsed him earlier in the day. Biden declared himself “a union man,” and said, “We need a president who works for all Americans.”

Biden Insists He Didn't Treat Anita Hill 'Badly,' When Pressed For Apology On TV

Biden began his remarks by referencing Saturday’s fatal shooting at a synagogue in Poway, Calif. “We’re in a battle for America’s soul — I really believe it — and we have to restore it,” Biden said, tying the California shooting to the shooting at Pittsburgh’s Tree of Life Synagogue six months ago, in which 11 worshipers were killed, as well as the deadly violence at the “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville, Va., in 2017.

Charlottesville was also central to Biden’s announcement video, released April 25 after much speculation about whether he would run.

Most of Biden’s remarks on Monday centered on economic issues of concern to middle-class voters, who comprised much of President Trump’s support in 2016. “If I’m gonna beat Donald Trump in 2020, it’s going to happen here in western Pennsylvania,” Trump said. Pennsylvania was one of three previously reliably Democratic industrial states that Trump captured in 2016.

“The middle class is hurting,” Biden said, calling himself “Middle Class Joe.” Conceding some economic markers were positive, Biden said the stock market “is roaring,” but he added, “you don’t feel it. [The] $2 trillion tax cut,” Biden continued, “did you feel it?”

The Democratic Field Is Set: 8 Questions About What Comes Next

Sounding a populist theme, Biden also criticized General Motors for closing a number of auto plants “the second they hit hard times,” and moving production to Mexico.

He also called for a national minimum wage of $15 per hour and said noncompete agreements, which prohibit some workers even in relatively low paying jobs from moving to a competing employer, were “wrong.”

Biden called on reversing “Trump’s tax cut for the wealthy,” said there were some $1.6 trillion in tax loopholes that could be closed, which would provide enough to send 6 million people to community college for free.

Who's Running For President? The 2020 Democrats

He also addressed health care, saying the Affordable Care Act approved while he was vice president to former President Barack Obama was “a huge step forward.”

“We have to stop this administration’s efforts to gut it,” he said. Biden revealed he favors allowing Americans not now covered by Medicare to buy into the plan, the so-called public option.

“Everybody knows who Donald Trump is,” Biden said, drawing distinctions with Trump, whom he called the only president who “decided not to represent the whole country.”

“We have to let them know who we are,” he said, adding, “We … have to choose hope over fear, unity over division, and maybe most importantly truth over lies.”

#NPRPoetry Month: Poet Danez Smith

Apr 29, 2019   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on #NPRPoetry Month: Poet Danez Smith

NPR’s Michel Martin talks Twitter poetry with Danez Smith, co-host of The Poetry Foundation’s VS podcast.

Richard Lugar, Longtime Indiana Senator And Foreign Policy Leader, Dies At 87

Apr 29, 2019   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Richard Lugar, Longtime Indiana Senator And Foreign Policy Leader, Dies At 87

Former Indiana Sen. Richard Lugar died Sunday at 87. Lugar was known for his lasting non-proliferation work after the Cold War.

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Former Indiana Sen. Richard Lugar died Sunday at 87. Lugar was known for his lasting non-proliferation work after the Cold War.

Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Richard Lugar, the former Indiana senator whose work in pursuit of nuclear non-proliferation helped cement his place as one of the Republican Party’s most influential voices on foreign policy, died on Sunday at the age of 87.

The former six-term senator died in Falls Church, Va. of complications from a neurological disorder known as chronic inflammatory demylinating polyneuropathy. Lugar’s wife Charlene and his four sons — Mark, Bob, John and David — were with him at the time of his death, following a short illness in the hospital, according to a statement from the Lugar Center.

Lugar’s political career began in 1964 when he was elected to the Indianapolis Board of School Commissioners. As the school board’s vice president, he worked to desegregate the city’s schools, according to The Indianapolis Star.

He went on to serve two terms as Indianapolis’ mayor before his election to the U.S. Senate in 1976.

During his time in the Senate, Lugar twice served as chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee and eventually became the longest-serving senator in Indiana history.

It was in the Senate where Lugar would turn his focus to the issue of nuclear non-proliferation. The work was fueled by his concerns that even as the Cold War was ending, the weapons of mass destruction created as a result of the conflict would continue to pose a threat.

Working with former Sen. Sam Nunn, D-Ga., Lugar created the Soviet Threat Reduction Act in 1991, “to address the large nuclear arsenals inherited by former Soviet states Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, and Kazakhstan after the Soviet Union’s collapse,” according to the Center for Arms Control and Non-Proliferation.

The bill created the Cooperative Threat Reduction Program within the Department of Defense. The program, also known as Nunn-Lugar, has led to the deactivation of more than 7,600 nuclear warheads, according to the Lugar Center.

“Our nation has lost an extraordinary statesman who made the world a safer and better place. I have lost a wonderful friend and trusted partner,” Nunn said in a statement on Sunday. “Dick Lugar treated every person with dignity and respect. This generation and future generations can learn much from his example in the political world and in life.”

While his non-proliferation legislation may be the most lasting of his career, Lugar was also an outspoken critic of South Africa’s apartheid system. As The Washington Post reports, Lugar led an effort in the Senate to overturn President Reagan’s veto of economic sanctions against South Africa.

“He was a very successful politician, but the rare one who managed to come to work every day not thinking about politics,” said Dan Diller, director of policy at the Lugar Center, in an interview with NPR. “He really believed that the United States could be governed by civility and compassion and he worked very hard to build consensus every day.”

Diller, who was Lugar’s legislative director for 10 years, said the former senator “thought that policies would be more effective and last longer if they weren’t enacted with 51% of the vote and he worked very hard over a long period of time to construct policies, many times in very difficult circumstances, to achieve those types of consensuses.”

Not all of Lugar’s work ended successfully. As previously reported by NPR, Lugar’s hesitancy to clearly and forcefully communicate his reservations about the Iraq War to President George W. Bush was considered a low point by many of the senator’s colleagues.

Long known as a moderate conservative, Lugar became an early victim of the Republican Party’s turn to the right in the years following the election of Barack Obama. In 2012, Lugar lost his primary to Tea Party favorite Richard Mourdock, who at the time was Indiana’s state treasurer. His loss foreshadowed a wave of defeats for moderates that year, as Tea Party members began to win seats in Congress.

His defeat was seen as a loss for the entire Senate.

“There is nobody, not one senator in the Republican Party today, who is in Dick Lugar’s universe,” former Sen. Chuck Hagel, a Nebraska Republican, said at the time.

Hagel served 12 years in the Senate with Lugar, including a time when both were on the Foreign Relations Committee. In 2012, Hagel said that “[Lugar is] the kind of public servant and elected official the country expects and deserves. He’s not driven by ideology, but makes decisions based on what’s best for the country.”

Following Lugar’s defeat in 2012, Obama would go on to award him with the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian honor.

As Obama gave Lugar the award he said Lugar’s legacy, “is the thousands of missiles and bombers and submarines and warheads that no longer threaten us.”

“We held different political beliefs, but traveling overseas together, he took me under his wing as we toured munitions storage facilities and talked over meals of borscht. Dick always stuck to the facts. He understood the intricacies of America’s power and the way words uttered in Washington echo around the globe,” Obama said in a statement on Sunday. “But perhaps most importantly, he exhibited the truth that common courtesy can speak across cultures.”

“In Dick, I saw someone who wasn’t a Republican or a Democrat first, but a problem-solver–an example of the impact of a public servant can make by eschewing partisan divisiveness to instead focus on common ground.”

After leaving the Senate, Lugar went on to create The Lugar Center, a non-profit based in Washington, D.C. that focuses on global issues that Lugar backed throughout his career including food security, the non-proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and bipartisanship.

Though his Senate career was over, many, including President Trump and Vice President Pence, still looked to Lugar for guidance when it came to issues such as threats from North Korea.

On Sunday, Vice President Pence, a fellow Hoosier, put out a statement saying, “Senator Lugar’s contributions to the life of our nation are countless … he leaves behind a legacy of public service that will inspire Hoosiers for generations.”

In order to articulate his vision, Diller said, Lugar always believed in one thing: the people.

“He really thought that people who came to work in public service and voters really were well-motivated and had good hearts and there’s always a deep reservoir of patriotic feeling and compassion in the United States,” Diller said. “Sometimes in the day-to-day back and forth of politics we lose sight of that, but he really believed that the American people had unlimited capacity to do good in the world and make this a great place and he never lost that confidence.”

Judge Damon J. Keith, Judicial Giant And Civil Rights Icon, Dies At 96

Apr 29, 2019   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on Judge Damon J. Keith, Judicial Giant And Civil Rights Icon, Dies At 96

Judge Damon J. Keith, pictured in October 2017 in his Detroit office, died on Sunday at the age of 96.

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Judge Damon J. Keith, pictured in October 2017 in his Detroit office, died on Sunday at the age of 96.

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Judge Damon J. Keith died today at the age of 96. The Detroit native, one of the nation’s longest-serving federal judges, was a tireless champion of civil rights and civil liberties.

Born in 1922, Keith was the grandson of enslaved people.

He went on to become the sixth African American in U.S. history to serve on the federal court of appeals.

During his time on the bench, he made a series of landmark decisions that changed the social and legal landscape of the country.

His outstanding accomplishments were all the more remarkable in light of the obstacles of racial bigotry with which he was repeatedly confronted.

In a 2015 PBS interview with Tavis Smiley, Keith described the Detroit of his childhood.

“I never had a black teacher. And the Fisher Y[MCA] was right across from Northwestern high school. Blacks could not go to that Fisher Y,” said Keith. “There wasn’t a black police officer above the rank of sergeant. There were no black judges. There were no black elected officials.”

Traveling to college, Keith was forced to sit in the back of the train because of his race.

He served in a segregated army in World War II.

Even his professional success as a lawyer and then as a judge did not shield him from the sting of racism.

“There’s not a day in my life in some way large or small, I’m not reminded of the fact that I’m black,” said Keith at age 92 in the same PBS interview.

Federal judge Wilhelmina M. Wright, one of Keith’s former law clerks, said Keith’s experience of racial discrimination fueled his unwavering commitment to fairness.

“Judge Keith’s legacy is one of courage, of justice, and a willingness of speaking truth to power,” said Wright.

Keith was appointed to a federal court in Michigan in 1967. That was only three years after the federal Civil Rights Act was signed.

In short order, contentious cases landed in his courtroom.

Keith found deliberate systemic race discrimination at work in education in Pontiac schools, in housing in Hamtramck, and in hiring and promotion at Detroit Edison.

And his findings angered those who considered the North to be free of the kind of intentional race discrimination associated with the South.

“What he’s been willing to do is to make the really, really difficult decisions,” said Saul Green, former U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of Michigan. “But also to put in place remedies that had tremendous breadth and that assured that outcomes truly served those who had been harmed.”

Among the remedies he ordered in the Pontiac case was school busing. This unleashed a fury among some white residents that included the burning of school buses.

At times Keith was subjected to death threats, and he and his family were placed under the protection of the U.S. Marshals Service.

“These were not safe decisions,” said Peter Hammer, professor of law at Wayne State University and co-author of a biography of Keith. “Either safe politically in what’s going to advance your career or make you popular or safe as a matter of physical integrity.”

About five years after becoming a federal judge, Keith stood up to President Nixon in what became known as the Keith case.

The case involved three leaders of the White Panther Party, an anti-war and anti-racism group with a far-left ideology. The three were charged with conspiracy to destroy government property, and one of them was charged with bombing the CIA office in Ann Arbor, Mich.

Keith rejected the government’s claim that it had the authority to conduct electronic surveillance without a warrant on anyone it considered a national security threat.

Hammer pointed out the courage it took to reach this decision at the height of Nixon’s popularity and in the midst of social turmoil over the Vietnam War.

“A young African American judge, against all better counsel, telling the president, ‘No,’ that not even a president can be above the law and order investigations and wiretaps without a judicial order,” Hammer said.

One year after the 9/11 attacks, Keith — who was by then on the federal court of appeals — said no to another U.S. president.

This time Keith said the Bush administration could not conduct deportation hearings in secret using a blanket national security justification.

Writing for a unanimous panel of judges, he coined the memorable phrase “democracies die behind closed doors.”

Hammer said Keith remained active and went into his chambers every day well into his 90s.

At the age of 94, he issued a blistering dissent in a 2016 Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals voting rights case, in which the majority upheld new voting requirements in Ohio.

In his dissenting opinion, Keith included the photographs of 36 civil rights martyrs, and he wrote:

“The utter brutality of white supremacy in its efforts to disenfranchise persons of color is the foundation for the tragedy that is the Majority’s effort to roll back the progress of history. I will not forget. I cannot forget — indeed America cannot forget — the pain, suffering, and sorrow of those who died for equal protection and for this precious right to vote.”

Keith’s life was devoted to using the law to correct injustices, according to Hammer.

“Decade after decade in diverse areas of law, really being the conscience of the country and making the Constitution a living document to protect people’s rights,” Hammer said.

At Howard University School of Law, Keith studied under Thurgood Marshall, who would later become a U.S. Supreme Court justice and who would through his life remain Keith’s mentor.

Keith said Marshall told his students it was their job to turn into a reality the phrase white men had inscribed on the façade of the U.S. Supreme Court building: “equal justice under law.”

“Equal justice under law: That’s the way I’ve tried to be as a lawyer and as a judge — make those words meaningful,” said Keith in the 2015 PBS interview.

Judge Keith did just that, and in the process, established himself as a civil rights icon and as one of the giants of American law.

‘Terrorism Will Not Take Us Down’ Says Rabbi Following Deadly Shooting In Poway

Apr 29, 2019   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on ‘Terrorism Will Not Take Us Down’ Says Rabbi Following Deadly Shooting In Poway

A day after his synagogue was attacked, Rabbi Yisroel Goldstein held a press conference outside the Chabad of Poway Synagogue to recount what happened during the deadly attack.

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A day after his synagogue was attacked, Rabbi Yisroel Goldstein held a press conference outside the Chabad of Poway Synagogue to recount what happened during the deadly attack.

Sandy Huffaker/AFP/Getty Images

A day after the synagogue he founded was attacked, Rabbi Yisroel Goldstein recounted the events of the shooting that left one woman dead and three others injured.

The shooting occurred on Saturday at the Chabad of Poway synagogue prior a scheduled Passover celebration.

The alleged shooter, 19-year-old John T. Earnest, was booked on one count of murder in the first degree and three counts of attempted murder in the first degree, according the San Diego County Sheriff’s Department.

California Synagogue Shooting Investigated As A Hate Crime After 1 Killed, 3 Injured

The sheriff’s office said they believe the alleged shooter acted alone. The case is being investigated as a possible hate crime and federal civil rights violation.

Goldstein said he was preparing for his sermon on Saturday, the last day of Passover and one of the holiest days of the year, when he walked into the lobby and saw Lori Gilbert Kaye. Kaye was coming to the service to say a prayer for her mother, who recently died, Goldstein said.

“I walk into the banquet hall to wash my hands. I walked two, three footsteps when I hear a loud bang,” Goldstein said.

He said he thought Kaye may have fallen or the lobby table tipped over. Goldstein said he saw a young man standing there with a firearm.

The rabbi said he looked at the man, but “he had sunglasses on and I couldn’t see his eyes. I couldn’t see his soul. I froze.”

Goldstein says his first concern was for Kaye, a friend of his, who he had known for close to 25 years.

As he was trying to figure out what happened to Kaye, Goldstein said the gunman fired shots that hit his hands. Goldstein said after four hours of surgery on Saturday he lost one of his index fingers.

Poway Shooting Latest In Series of Attacks On Places Of Worship

After being shot, Goldstein said he realized there were children playing in the banquet hall.

His voice breaking, Goldstein said, “I ran to gather them together. My granddaughter, four-and-a-half years old, sees her grandpa with a bleeding hand and she sees me screaming and shouting ‘Get out! Get out!’ She didn’t deserve to see her grandfather like this.”

With some of the children out, Goldstein says one man, Almog Peretz, went back in to help get additional children out, which included Peretz’s 8-year-old niece Noya Dahan. Peretz and Dahan were both injured and treated for their wounds. Goldstein said both were doing well and recovering on Sunday.

“Miraculously, just miraculously, the gun jammed,” Goldstein said. “And in attendance at the synagogue there was a border patrol, off-duty agent…who recently discovered his Jewish roots.”

A memorial sits across the street from the Chabad of Poway Synagogue. On Saturday, one person was killed and three others injured when a gunman entered the building and fired his weapon.

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A memorial sits across the street from the Chabad of Poway Synagogue. On Saturday, one person was killed and three others injured when a gunman entered the building and fired his weapon.

Sandy Huffaker/AFP/Getty Images

That agent, Jonathan Morales, fired at the suspect’s car.

“After the shooter left — this terrorist left — I turned around to asses the situation,” the rabbi said. “I walk into the lobby and I see Lori lying the floor unconscious.”

Goldstein said Kaye’s husband was trying to resuscitate her, but fainted next to his wife.

Kaye was a pioneer for the congregation, Goldstein said.

He added, “For those of us that know Lori know that she is a person of unconditional love.”

NBA’s Lack Of Latino Players

Apr 28, 2019   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on NBA’s Lack Of Latino Players

Now that the NBA playoffs are in full swing, there’s an element missing: Latino players. Just 2% of NBA players are Latino and that has the league looking for ways to increase the number of Latinos.

With Final ‘Avengers’ Movie Out, The Wait Ends For Marvel Superfan

Apr 28, 2019   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on With Final ‘Avengers’ Movie Out, The Wait Ends For Marvel Superfan

NPR’s Michel Martin speaks with Marvel superfan Tony Mitchell about Avengers: Endgame, which has been breaking box office records this week.

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