Browsing articles from "April, 2018"

Dennis Ross Comments On Pompeo’s First Trip As Secretary Of State

Apr 30, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Dennis Ross Comments On Pompeo’s First Trip As Secretary Of State

Steve Inskeep talks to Ambassador Dennis Ross, who advised several presidents on Middle East policy, about Secretary of State Mike Pompeo’s trip to Saudi Arabia and his call for Gulf states to unite against Iran.

Critics Lash Out Against Planned Foxconn Factory In Wisconsin

Apr 30, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Critics Lash Out Against Planned Foxconn Factory In Wisconsin

Groundbreaking is expected soon on a massive Foxconn plant near Milwaukee that would make LCD panels for cell phones and other devices. But before there’s a factory, there are concerns from neighbors, environmental groups and advocates for workplace diversity.

Trump And North Korea’s Leader Draw Closer To Face-To-Face Meeting

Apr 30, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on Trump And North Korea’s Leader Draw Closer To Face-To-Face Meeting

Before President Trump and Kim Jong Un can meet, there are still some key logistics to work out — such as where and when such a meeting would take place.

Migrants Denied Entry To U.S. At Crowded San Diego Border Crossing

Apr 30, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on Migrants Denied Entry To U.S. At Crowded San Diego Border Crossing

The remnants of a large caravan of Central American migrants gathered at one of the busiest U.S.-Mexico border crossings. Before they were turned away because the entry had reached capacity, many had hoped to win asylum in the U.S.

70 Years Later, Memorial Held For Unarmed Black Man Fatally Shot By Police

Apr 29, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on 70 Years Later, Memorial Held For Unarmed Black Man Fatally Shot By Police



MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And finally, today, we’re going to continue our conversation about memorials in the town of Gretna, La. A service was held there today to remember an unarmed black man killed by police, 70 years ago. All these years later, community members are still demanding justice. Jesse Hardman reports.

JESSE HARDMAN, BYLINE: Roy Brooks, doesn’t like his town of Gretna, La.

ROY BROOKS: I don’t go anywhere in Gretna. I don’t patronize them or anything. I go to Walgreens only. I just don’t feel as though I’m welcomed here in this town.

HARDMAN: The relationship between the 62-year-old Brooks, who’s black, and Gretna, a town that’s majority white, was fraught from the get-go. The reason? His grandfather, Royal Brooks, was killed by a local policeman before Roy was born. He often drives by the side of the incident, a few blocks from his home.

BROOKS: This is the old Gretna post office. That’s where my grandfather was killed, right over there.

HARDMAN: On February 27, 1948, Royal Brooks was taken off a public bus by a traffic cop. Some witnesses said he’d assaulted the bus driver over a fare disagreement. Others said he was trying to help a white woman who’d gotten on the wrong bus. What’s undisputed is the officer shot Brooks who was unarmed. The Louisiana Weekly, a black community newspaper, published the only known photo of the incident.

KAYLIE SIMON: I think you see a lot of African-American people who just witnessed a murder. They look outraged and sad, and they’re looking at Royal Brooks’ dying body on the street.

HARDMAN: That’s Kaylie Simon speaking via Skype. She’s a lawyer who’s been digging up documents about the case. Simon works for the Restorative Justice Project at Northeastern University School of Law, in Boston. Her team’s researching hundreds of racially-motivated killings between 1930 and 1970 and sharing what they find with descendants of the victims.

SIMON: Providing the information confirms their reality and their narrative which has often been contradicted by either white newspapers or a possible acquittal in court of the white perpetrator.

HARDMAN: In Royal Brooks’ case, the white officer was acquitted and went back to work despite a huge uproar from the black community. Simon’s not re-trying the case, she’s helping Roy Brooks and his family define what justice means to them.

BROOKS: To get an apology? Yeah, that would be fine with us.

HARDMAN: Gretna Mayor Belinda Constant acknowledges the family’s grief.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

BELINDA CONSTANT: We do everything we can to ensure that these injustices will never happen again.

HARDMAN: The Brooks family wants a new gravestone. They’d also like Northeastern’s research to be preserved by the Gretna Historical Society, that means talking to a local historian B.J. LeBlanc. He equates his hometown with Mayberry the fictitious Southern haven featured in the “Andy Griffith Show.”

B.J. LEBLANC: It’s a nice, quiet, peaceful town, although we do have more than a sheriff and a deputy. You know, we have a police chief, and we have a full-time police force.

HARDMAN: LeBlanc admits the police force might not have always treated black residents fairly.

LEBLANC: I think it’s a lot different than it was back then.

HARDMAN: But even today, the town’s divided. Whistleblowers inside the Gretna Police Department say the agency has a quota system for traffic tickets. A federal class action suit claims this corruption targets black residents. That’s why Roy Brooks drives slowly when he passes through Gretna on the way to his grandfather’s grave.

BROOKS: I’m walking around here, don’t know if I’m walking on my grandfather’s grave or not.

HARDMAN: Brooks likes being able to visit, but closure? That’s trickier, he says. He still wants to tell his grandfather a few things.

BROOKS: That I love him. I wish I could’ve learned a lot from him or learn some of his history, you know.

HARDMAN: Brooks knows a little bit more now about how his grandfather died. What he still wants to know – is how he lived. For NPR News, I’m Jesse Hardman in Gretna, La.

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Burning Man Co-Founder Larry Harvey Dies At 70

Apr 29, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Burning Man Co-Founder Larry Harvey Dies At 70

A sign is posted at the entrance checkpoint for the Burning Man festival in Nevada’s Black Rock Desert in 2000. The festival’s co-founder, Larry Harvey, died on Saturday at 70 after suffering a massive stroke.

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A sign is posted at the entrance checkpoint for the Burning Man festival in Nevada’s Black Rock Desert in 2000. The festival’s co-founder, Larry Harvey, died on Saturday at 70 after suffering a massive stroke.

Hector Mata /AFP/Getty Images

Larry Harvey, co-founder of the Burning Man festival, died Saturday at the age of 70, according to the organization’s Facebook page and website.

The first Burning Man event took place on a San Francisco beach in 1986 after Harvey had the idea to burn a giant effigy in celebration. The event eventually grew into the seminal arts and culture festival in Nevada’s Black Rock Desert marked by the burning of a giant wooden sculpture of a man.

Harvey had been hospitalized after suffering a massive stroke earlier this month.

“We resolutely held out for a miracle,” wrote Burning Man Project CEO Marian Goodell in the “Burning Man Journal.” “If there was anyone tenacious, strong-willed and stubborn enough to come back from this challenge, it was Larry. Though we all hoped he would recover, he passed peacefully this morning at 8:24am in San Francisco, with members of his family at his side.”

Desert Music: Burning Man Confronts The Rising Beat

Since the early 1990s, tens of thousands of free-spirited revelers have descended on the Black Rock Desert, about two hours north of Reno, Nev., each August. Festival-goers take in art, participate in meditation and other mind-bending events at the week-long celebration.

Festival-goers pay anywhere from $425 to $1,200 a ticket to travel to the scorching hot desert, according to the Associated Press, where they bring their own food, camp out and partake in a range of events. On the festival’s penultimate night, a huge effigy or Man is set on fire in a massive, jubilant celebration.

Many stories have been told about why Harvey decided to build a wooden man and set it ablaze on the beach in 1986.

“I called a friend and said, “Let’s go to the beach and burn a man,” Harvey told the website Green Living in 2007. “And he said, ‘Can you say that again?’ And I did and we did it.”

After that simple gathering, Harvey conceptualized the larger countercultural festival he would name Burning Man. In 2004, Harvey documented the budding ideology behind the event in “10 Principles of Burning Man.”

Bugs Leave As Quickly As They Swarmed In Days Before Burning Man

The AP once described Burning Man as “an esoteric mix of pagan fire ritual and sci-fi Dada circus where some paint their bodies, bang drums, dance naked and wear costumes that would draw stares in a Mardi Gras parade.”

Sometimes the event would get out of hand. In 2017, a man died after running into the Burning Man’s flames. In 1996, a man died after his motorcycle crashed into a van of festival-goers, and three others were injured in a separate incident involving a drunk driver, the AP reports.

Over the years, Harvey faced criticism for turning Burning Man into a cash cow. In 2014, he transitioned Burning Man from private ownership to a nonprofit organization with 70 employees and a budget of $30 million, according to the AP. Harvey remained deeply involved as a member of the organization’s board and “chief philosophic officer.”

Some critics often likened Harvey to guru leading a cult, though he resisted that depiction.

“Larry was never one for labels,” Goodell wrote. “He didn’t fit a mold; he broke it with the way he lived his life. He was 100% authentic to his core.”

Trump Skips Annual Gathering Of D.C. Journalists For A Second Year

Apr 29, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on Trump Skips Annual Gathering Of D.C. Journalists For A Second Year

President Trump greets supporters during a campaign rally Saturday in Washington Township, Mich.

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President Trump greets supporters during a campaign rally Saturday in Washington Township, Mich.

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While the White House press corps was gathered in Washington, D.C., Saturday night for an annual gala, President Trump was in another Washington with a different crowd that he much preferred.

For the second year in a row, the president opted not to attend the White House Correspondents’ Dinner and instead hold a campaign rally of his own. And this year, he held it in Washington Township, Mich. — which is located in Macomb County, Mich., the home of the so-called Reagan Democrats, but which is now part of what’s known as “Trump Country.”

“Hello, Michigan. Hello, Michigan.” Trump said as the large crowd inside an arena chanted “USA! USA! USA!”

“You may have heard I was invited to another event tonight,” the president said, adding “but I’d much rather be in Washington, Michigan, than in Washington, D.C., right now. That I can tell you.”

Despite the night being framed by his absence from the nation’s capital and from an event hosted by D.C. journalists celebrating the First Amendment which his predecessors have dutifully attended, Trump’s remarks focused less on his familiar lines of attack against the media and more on his trademark policy initiatives, his accomplishments during his first 16 months in office and November’s midterm elections.

Despite So Much Winning, The Right Feels Like It's Losing

“We need to elect more Republicans so we can protect our cities, defend our borders, grow our economy and continue to make America great again,” Trump said early in his 80 minutes of remarks delivered in his often improvisational, stream-of-consciousness style to enthusiastic supporters.

“You see what’s happening with regulations, with massive tax cuts, with judges,” Trump also told the crowd that was cheering, holding signs and wearing red “Make America Great Again” hats.

“We’re appointing judges like, I guess — never before has anything happened like what we’re doing on great, conservative, Republican judges,” he said. The president also gave a specific shout-out to Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch who, Trump said, “has been fantastic.”

The Russia Investigations: The House Intel Committee Duels Over Evidence. Again

Trump’s nearly hour-and-a-half-long stump speech touched on many of his recognizable talking points, including: having respect for the American flag and standing for the national anthem; having a strong military and increasing military spending; the strength of the economy and the stock market; the need for more job training for the skilled trades and more vocational schools; and his persistent claims of bias and corruption in the FBI as it has investigated Russia’s interference in the 2016 presidential election.

Kim, Moon Pledge Denuclearization Of Peninsula And End To Korean War

Just days after a meeting between the leaders of North Korea and South Korea and ahead of his planned meeting with the North’s Kim Jong Un next month, the president trumpeted his efforts to pressure the North to end its nuclear weapons program.

While he conceded he didn’t “really know” how his diplomatic efforts would turn out, he assured the crowd with, “I’ll tell you one thing: We’re not playing games.”

And answering criticism that he was engaging in nuclear brinksmanship with a volatile regime, Trump said, “No, strength is going to keep us out of nuclear war. It’s not going to get us in.”

Regarding trade and his desire to end some multilateral trade deals and negotiate new bilateral deals instead, the president explained, “I can’t let other countries take advantage of us. I can’t.”

Trump-Macron Friendship Can't Mask Stark Differences On Iran, Syria And Trade

And echoing one of his talking points on trade, Trump said he doesn’t fault other countries and world leaders for what he sees as unfair or imbalanced trade and deficits. Instead, “I blame past presidents and past leaders of our country,” he told the crowd who erupted in cheers.

The president renewed his praise of Dr. Ronny Jackson, who withdrew his nomination to be the secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs, and his attacks on Sen. Jon Tester, D-Mont., who had led the effort to surface allegations against Jackson that doomed the nomination. Tester is up for re-election in November in a state that Trump carried in 2016.

Jackson is “a truly high-quality human being,” Trump said.

“Well, I know things about Tester that I could say, too,” the president added, “and if I said them, he’d never be elected again.”

3 Lessons The White House Could Learn After The Downfall Of Another Trump Nominee

“What Jon Tester did to this man is a disgrace,” Trump told the crowd. Jackson has denied the allegations against him that recently made headlines. And late Friday, the White House said it had conducted its own investigation of the most serious allegations against Jackson. That investigation yielded no documents supporting the allegations and found some evidence refuting two major allegations against Jackson, the White House said.

On border security, the president seemed to suggest in an offhand way that he was willing to see the federal government shut down in order to get the level of security on the U.S.-Mexico border that he desires.

“We have to have borders and we have to have them fast. And we need security. We need the wall,” the president said. Trump explained that his administration had already obtained $1.6 billion in funding from Congress for improvements along the southern border. “We come up again on September 28th and if we don’t get border security, we’ll have no choice. We’ll close down the country.”

The president also gave a nod to rapper Kanye West who has stirred controversy by espousing his support for Trump on Twitter, a move that has made the artist a symbol of free speech and free thought in recent days on Trump-friendly Fox News.

Kanye West Hits The Campaign Trail On 'Ye Vs. The People'

“Kanye West gets it,” the president says after touting milestones in black and Hispanic unemployment that have been achieved during his tenure in office.

As for November and what many political observers see as a tough midterms season for the GOP, Trump juxtaposed national Democrats against many of his initiatives and policy positions.

“The Democrats don’t care about our military, they don’t care about our borders and I don’t think they care much about crime,” the president said.

“Nancy Pelosi and her gang, they’ve got to be voted out of office,” Trump added.

“A vote for a Democrat in November is a vote for open borders and crime. It’s very simple,” Trump also told the crowd later in his remarks after referencing Sen. Debbie Stabenow, D-Mich., who is up for re-election this year. “It’s also a vote for much higher taxes. It’s also a vote for — be careful of your Second Amendment. OK, be careful. Be careful of your Second Amendment if they get in.”

President Trump speaks to supporters during a campaign rally Saturday in in Washington Township, Mich.

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President Trump speaks to supporters during a campaign rally Saturday in in Washington Township, Mich.

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The president’s rally was a hit with two supporters from Livonia, Mich., who spoke with NPR.

Bill King, a retiree, said he’s “loving” Trump so far and that he believes the president is good for the economy. King also agreed with Trump’s central message Saturday night.

“Republican voters are going to have to show up,” King told NPR, “The left wing is jazzed up for this; they’re motivated. We have to get Republicans motivated in order to keep good things happening.” King said he still wants to see Trump’s border wall built, to have the nation’s immigration laws changed as Trump and some conservative Republicans in Congress are proposing and for Congress to pass a second round of tax cuts.

King’s wife, Gina, said she approved of Trump. “To me, he’s really proven that somebody who isn’t part of the swamp can get things done — even though he has a lot of resistance.”

Both Kings said they are frustrated with members of Congress in both parties, saying Capitol Hill is obstructing Trump and not getting enough done.

And the media?

The press was the target of the president’s ire Saturday night far less than it was last year — when he skipped the same Washington, D.C., event and held a campaign rally in Harrisburg, Pa.

“These are very dishonest people, many of them. They are very, very dishonest people. Fake news, very dishonest,” Trump told the Michigan crowd after criticizing the use of anonymous sources in press reports.

The president also called out “fake CNN” near the end of his remarks.

“By the way, is this better than that phony, Washington White House Correspondents’ Dinner? Is this more fun?” the president asked just before he wrapped up his speech.

The question was clearly rhetorical and the answer was obvious both to Trump and the arena full of supporters.

But if there was any doubt, the president put it to rest.

He told the crowd had he been at the dinner in the other Washington, he would’ve been forced to smile through attacks on him or face negative stories afterward about not being a good sport while being roasted at the annual gathering of D.C. journalists.

“You know, there’s no winning,” he said over cheers.

Comedian Faces Criticism After Controversial Remarks At D.C. Gala

Apr 29, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on Comedian Faces Criticism After Controversial Remarks At D.C. Gala

Comedian Michelle Wolf performs at the White House Correspondents’ Association dinner in Washington on Saturday.

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Comedian Michelle Wolf performs at the White House Correspondents’ Association dinner in Washington on Saturday.

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President Trump’s absence for the second year in a row from the annual White House Correspondents’ Dinner may end up being the least controversial thing about Saturday night’s gathering of the White House press corps.

Chatter online amongst Washington, D.C., journalists and some in the administration’s orbit after the event was full of criticism for comedian Michelle Wolf, who was the evening’s headliner; criticism and soul-searching about the annual event itself; and an effort by former White House press secretary Sean Spicer to pressure the leadership of the White House Correspondents’ Association into answering for Wolf’s vulgar, personal jabs leveled primarily at the president and his inner circle.

The comedian spoke for roughly 20 minutes to a ballroom full of Washington’s top journalists and political operatives in remarks too lewd in many respects to be repeated here. The Washington Post’s Paul Farhi wrote Wolf’s remarks “swerved from raunchy to downright nasty.”

“She was particularly hard on the women associated with Trump,” Farhi also wrote, adding “several cracks about [White House press secretary] Sarah Huckabee Sanders landed poorly.” (Courtesy of two of Farhi’s colleagues at the Post, here’s a list of Wolf’s “harshest” jokes.) And Politico observed of Wolf’s performance that “it was a risque and uneven routine at first met with laughs but often greeted by awkward silence.”

The comedic routine laced with sexual innuendo and, at times, dominated by outright vulgarities was directed primarily at Republicans and conservatives — a fact not lost on those in the room who expressed their displeasure on Twitter afterward.

“My wife @mercedesschlapp and I walked out early from the wh correspondents dinner. Enough of elites mocking all of us,” Matt Schlapp posted on Twitter just before 11 p.m. Schlapp is the chairman of the American Conservative Union and his wife, Mercedes, is part of the White House’s communications team.

Former Trump chief of staff Reince Priebus called the night an “R/X rated spectacle that started poorly and ended up in the bottom of the canyon. Another victory for @realDonaldTrump for not attending and proving his point once again. The room was uncomfortable. Trump lovers and even a large number of Trump haters were pretty miserable.”

Spicer’s critique was more pointed. “Tonight’s #WHCD was a disgrace,” the former Trump spokesman said on Twitter.

The criticism was joined by some well-known political journalists who sounded off both about Wolf’s remarks and the nature of the event more broadly.

White House press secretary Sarah Sanders was the particular target of harsh treatment by Wolf — as Sanders sat on the dais not far from the lectern where Wolf was speaking. Afterward, some of the journalists from outlets known to spar with the White House or be on the receiving end of pointed attacks directly from the president spoke out on Sanders’ behalf.

“That @PressSec sat and absorbed intense criticism of her physical appearance, her job performance, and so forth, instead of walking out, on national television, was impressive,” tweeted Maggie Haberman of The New York Times. (Haberman said on Twitter that she did not attend the event in person but had watched it on TV.)

“Lots of critics but she has always been decent and professional to me — if not entirely forthcoming,” The Washington Post’s Josh Dawsey posted on Twitter about Sanders, attaching Haberman’s tweet about the Trump spokeswoman.

“The spirit of the event had always been jokes that singe but don’t burn,” said Kelly O’Donnell of NBC News, “Reporters who work with her daily appreciate that @presssec was there.” Like Dawsey, O’Donnell included Haberman’s tweet praising Sanders’ composure under fire.

“Unfortunately, I don’t think we advanced the cause of journalism tonight,” Peter Baker, also of The New York Times, said online.

As Haberman’s tweet had, Baker’s set off a series of responses, subtweets and amens from fellow journalists.

“Couldn’t agree more,” CNN’s Jeff Zeleny posted on Twitter, “So much important and amazing journalism this year — that should be the focus, when truth matters and is needed more than ever. It was an embarrassment in the room and surely to the audience at home.”

“He’s talking about the White House Correspondents Assn dinner,” tweeted Fox News political analyst Brit Hume. “He’s right,” Hume said, attaching Baker’s tweet.

“The White House Correspondents’ Dinner is a deeply flawed event that doesn’t do what it aspires to do and is serious need of retooling,” wrote Robert Yoon, a political research expert and former longtime employee of CNN’s political unit in D.C., wrote online, also referencing Baker’s tweet.

Other journalists saw broader political implications stemming from the controversial remarks.

“Michelle Wolf — and the WHCD — really played into Trump’s hand tonight. Trump is vulgar and mean-spirited, but that doesn’t mean that Wolf needed to be the same,” tweeted D.C. fixture and longtime political analyst Stuart Rothenberg.

John Ward of Yahoo News called the comedy routine “a political gift to the Trump admin[istration].”

Echoing Ward, Rothenberg and Baker, Meg Kinnard of The Associated Press saw very specific implications for journalists, especially those working and reporting in predominantly Republican states. Saturday night’s event “made the chasm between journalists and those who don’t trust us, even wider,” Kinnard tweeted. “And those of us based in the red states who work hard every day to prove our objectivity will have to deal with it.”

In a trio of tweets early Sunday morning Spicer sought to elicit a response from the White House Correspondents’ Association to the criticism Wolf had received.

Comedian Kathy Griffin, who has herself been embroiled in controversy over her past comments about the president, took up Wolf’s defense and responded to Baker and Zeleny.

“Then don’t have a comic do a roast,” Griffin told the two longtime White House reporters on Twitter, “If you want to focus on the journalism do a boring awards show. Journalism is all about the 1st amendment..If you don’t see the import of what @michelleisawolf did tonight then you don’t get it.”

For her part, Wolf responded to Spicer calling the event a “disgrace” with a simple “Thank you!” on Twitter. And the comedian also challenged Haberman’s critique, suggesting The New York Times White House reporter was harboring unspoken concerns about Sanders’ appearance.

The controversy over Wolf seemed to steal headlines which the president had seemingly tried to steal for himself by absenting himself from the dinner for a second consecutive year and going to Michigan for a campaign rally instead.

Trump Skips Annual Gathering Of D.C. Journalists For A Second Year

In his remarks there earlier Saturday evening, Trump had called the press “very dishonest people” and “fake news.” He called the dinner in D.C. “phony” and said he had much preferred to be in Washington Township, Mich., rather than back in the nation’s capital in a ballroom full of the journalists who cover him and his administration.

He told the enthusiastic crowd of supporters that had he been at the dinner in the other Washington, he would’ve been forced to smile through attacks on him or face negative stories afterward about not being a good sport while being roasted by Wolf.

Despite So Much Winning, The Right Feels Like It's Losing

“You know, there’s no winning,” he said over cheers.

Back in D.C., Matt and Mercedes Schlapp articulated Trump’s concerns more philosophically — concerns widely shared by conservatives across the country who see themselves as losing out in a broader culture war despite their electoral victories in the Trump era.

“America was watching and it’s why they hate the swamp,” Matt Schlapp said in a tweet addressed to Sanders.

“It’s why America hates the out of touch leftist media elite,” Mercedes Schlapp tweeted, referencing her husband’s tweet about “the swamp.”

Passenger Who Survived A Fatal Flight Is Suing Southwest Airlines

Apr 28, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Passenger Who Survived A Fatal Flight Is Suing Southwest Airlines

National Transportation Safety Board investigators examine damage to Southwest Airlines Flight 1380, which left one passenger dead and other injured on April 17. A passenger filed a lawsuit against the airline on Thursday.

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National Transportation Safety Board investigators examine damage to Southwest Airlines Flight 1380, which left one passenger dead and other injured on April 17. A passenger filed a lawsuit against the airline on Thursday.

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A passenger who was on the Southwest Airlines plane with an exploding engine part has sued the carrier.

Lilia Chavez, a California native, boarded a flight on April 17 at New York’s LaGuardia Airport that was bound for Dallas. Twenty minutes later and at an altitude of 32,000 feet, the oxygen masks fell.

Passengers heard an explosion, a window shattered, a woman was nearly ejected from the window. The plane made an emergency landing in Philadelphia but the woman, a mother of two, died from blunt trauma to her head, neck and torso. Other passengers survived with injuries.

Chavez was sitting three seats behind the smashed window, according to the document filed on Thursday in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania. The lawsuit alleges that the traumatic events of Flight 1380 left Chavez suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder, depression and other personal injuries.

FAA Orders Inspections Of Engine Type That Blew Apart On Southwest Flight

“Ms. Chavez witnessed the horror as the force of the depressurization pulled an innocent passenger partially through the shattered window and she watched as passengers risked their lives to pull the passenger back into the aircraft and save her life,” says the document.

It describes how Chavez “prayed and feared for her life” and heard other passengers calling their loved ones to say their final goodbyes. Chavez also “contacted her children to tell them that she loved them and that she was preparing to die aboard the crippled aircraft,” says the lawsuit.

Her lawyer, Bradley J. Stoll, told NPR that Chavez is “a very brilliant, successful woman who in her life has overcome very significant obstacles and is the matriarch of her immediate and extended family. This accident has crippled her will and she is in shock over this horrible, near-death experience.”

Chavez has already been through hardship, according to an alumni video posted online. Her mother was killed when she 14 and she raised siblings who passed in and out of jail. She worked as a counselor in an adult college program before eventually receiving a Ph.D.

Her lawsuit alleges that the air carrier was negligent and breached its obligations – failing to warn passengers that the aircraft and engine had defects.

“Rather than protect the safety of Plaintiff and those who also were fare paying customers, the defendants’ misconduct placed profits and business over the safety of its customers and continued to operate these engines,” it says.

Southwest Airlines CEO Gary Kelly said at a news conference the twin-engine 737 had been inspected two days before the incident. National Transportation Safety Board Chairman Robert Sumwalt said a fatigue fracture likely caused the engine to fail, but that it would have been difficult to detect.

A similar incident occurred in 2016 when Southwest Flight 3472 from New Orleans to Orlando suffered an engine failure from a fan blade that broke off.

After that incident, Southwest disagreed with a Federal Aviation Authority proposal about engine inspections, reported Reuters. The air carrier believed the FAA “vastly understated” the number of engines that would require inspection and their cost. It reportedly told the FAA that not all 24 fan blades in each engine should be inspected.

1 Person Dies After Southwest Jet With Blown Engine Makes Emergency Landing

The lawsuit also names companies that designed, manufactured and sold the engines, including CFM International, GE Aviation and Safran.

After the incident, Southwest sent out letters of apology, a $5,000 check and $1,000 travel voucher to the people who were on the plane that day. It responded to NPR by email, “Our focus remains on working with the [National Transportation Safety Board] to support their investigation. We can’t comment on any pending litigation. The Safety and security of our Employees and Customers is our highest priority at all times.”

Chavez’s attorney said the lawsuit is important because what happened could have been prevented. “This is a failure that occurred in the past and the decisions that Southwest and CFM International made will be under scrutiny in this lawsuit. And it affects every person who flies as passengers in commercial aircraft.”

Official Says Investigation Doesn’t Support Allegations Against White House Doctor

Apr 28, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Official Says Investigation Doesn’t Support Allegations Against White House Doctor

Rear Adm. Ronny Jackson, on Capitol Hill before he withdrew from consideration to be Veterans Affairs secretary.

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Rear Adm. Ronny Jackson, on Capitol Hill before he withdrew from consideration to be Veterans Affairs secretary.

J. Scott Applewhite/AP

The White House has completed its investigation of the most serious allegations that surfaced against Rear Adm. Ronny Jackson, a White House official said. Jackson had been President Trump’s nominee to be secretary of Veterans Affairs until he pulled out of consideration on Thursday.

At that time, Jackson called the allegations against him “completely false and fabricated,” but said they had become a distraction for Trump and the mission to help veterans.

The allegations were made public by Sen. Jon Tester of Montana, the senior Democrat on the Senate Veterans Affairs Committee. He said they came from nearly two dozen current and former military service members who’d worked with Jackson.

The White House official, who declined to speak on the record, said the White House investigation did not find any documents to back up the allegations, and found evidence to refute two major accusations.

Veterans Affairs In Limbo After Jackson Withdraws As Nominee

On the allegation that Jackson wrecked a government car after drinking at a Secret Service going away party: The official said the White House looked at General Services Administration records. The GSA would have records on all government vehicles. Investigators found three accident reports involving Jackson and a government vehicle. They indicate he was not at fault in any of the accidents, none of which involved alcohol or drugs. Two of the accidents happened in the morning and one happened in the 5 p.m. hour. None of them happened late at night or “bear any resemblance to the Tester allegations,” the official said.

On the “reckless” dispensing of drug prescriptions: The official said there are regular audits of the White House Medical Office by Walter Reed Medical Center. The White House asked for the past two and a half years of audits. The audits are done quarterly and none of the audits found that the drugs were handed out in a way that was against medical policy.

The official also pointed to a Secret Service statement refuting an allegation first reported by CNN that Jackson became intoxicated during an overseas trip in 2015 and banged on the hotel room door of a female employee. The report alleged that he made so much noise that the Secret Service intervened out of concern he would wake then-President Obama. The Secret Service “has no such record of any incident; specifically, any incident involving Rear Admiral Ronny Jackson. A thorough review of internal documents related to all Presidential foreign travel that occurred in 2015, in addition to interviews of personnel who were present during foreign travel that occurred during the same timeframe, has resulted in no information that would indicate the allegation is accurate.”

The Secret Service statement went on to say, “Rear Admiral Jackson, in his role as the official White House Physician, has provided years of dedicated support to the men and women of the Secret Service, often miles from home and under difficult travel conditions, in order to ensure our personnel are healthy and prepared to execute our critical mission. The Secret Service is grateful for the dedicated and outstanding professional service Rear Admiral Jackson has provided to the agency – and more importantly – his role supporting the greater Presidential protection security apparatus.”

On Friday, Trump once again defended Jackson’s character, calling him an “American hero” and recalling that Presidents Obama and Bush had given Jackson rave reviews. Trump blamed Jackson’s failed nomination on Sen. Tester and the current political climate in Washington, which he said could be a “very mean place.”

NPR’s Shirley Henry contributed to this report.

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