Browsing articles from "January, 2018"

NAACP Honors Memphis Sanitation Workers Who Went On Strike In 1968

Jan 16, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on NAACP Honors Memphis Sanitation Workers Who Went On Strike In 1968

Tennessee National Guard troopers in jeeps and trucks escort a protest march by striking sanitation workers through downtown Memphis, March 30, 1968.

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Tennessee National Guard troopers in jeeps and trucks escort a protest march by striking sanitation workers through downtown Memphis, March 30, 1968.

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In 1968, 1,300 black men from the Memphis Department of Public Works went on strike after a malfunctioning truck crushed two garbage collectors to death.

The strike led to marches with demonstrators carrying signs declaring “I Am A Man.” Their organizing efforts drew support from the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. before his assassination.

“We were just fighting for equal payment and equal rights from the sanitation department,” Elmore Nickleberry, one of the workers who went on strike and continued to work for the city decades later, told NPR last year.

On Monday night, the NAACP Image Awards is set to honor the sanitation workers who went on strike 50 years ago with its Vanguard Award.

Derrick Johnson, the NAACP’s president and CEO, says the country’s oldest civil rights organization is honoring the workers for fighting for safer conditions and better pay.

“There would have never been a civil rights movement if individuals were not being exploited for free and cheap labor,” Johnson says. “And the workers’ strike demonstrates the need to continue to advocate, ensure that individuals are paid a livable wage particularly in the South.”

Cleophus Smith (left), autographs a poster at the National Civil Rights Museum on Thursday, April 4, 2013, in Memphis, Tenn. The poster is a reproduction of the signs he and Alvin Turner (center) and Baxter Leach (right), carried when they were part of the 1968 sanitation workers strike in Memphis.

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Cleophus Smith (left), autographs a poster at the National Civil Rights Museum on Thursday, April 4, 2013, in Memphis, Tenn. The poster is a reproduction of the signs he and Alvin Turner (center) and Baxter Leach (right), carried when they were part of the 1968 sanitation workers strike in Memphis.

Mark Humphrey/AP

Taylor Rogers, another worker who went on strike, remembered hearing King lend his support to the workers during a visit to Memphis in April 3, 1968. King’s talk at the Mason Temple became known as the “I’ve been to the Mountaintop” speech.

“You just really can’t describe it,” Rogers told StoryCorps in an episode that aired in 2006. “He stopped everything, put everything aside to come to Memphis to see about the people on the bottom of the ladder, the sanitation workers.”

The next evening, King was assassinated in Memphis.

Some of the surviving sanitation workers are still working for the city of Memphis today.

NPR’s Avie Schneider contributed to this report.

Trump Advocates For Public Service On MLK Day, But Spends It At Mar-A-Lago Resort

Jan 16, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Trump Advocates For Public Service On MLK Day, But Spends It At Mar-A-Lago Resort

President Trump spent the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday at his Mar-A-Lago resort in Palm Beach, Fla. Previous presidents have marked the holiday doing volunteer work.

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President Trump spent the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday at his Mar-A-Lago resort in Palm Beach, Fla. Previous presidents have marked the holiday doing volunteer work.

Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Some members of the Trump administration started off the holiday honoring Martin Luther King Jr. at a wreath-laying ceremony at the civil rights leader’s memorial in Washington Monday. But the president’s first stop was his own golf club.

Trump signed a federal holiday proclamation at the White House on Friday where he praised King for his leadership in the civil rights movement. And, in words that echoed every president before him since 1994, Trump encouraged “all Americans to observe this day with acts of civic work and community service in honor of Dr. King’s extraordinary life.”

Yet, it appears Trump ignored his own inspiring message. He spent most of the day at his own Mar-a-Lago resort in West Palm Beach, Fla.

Although he retweeted an official White House video in which he pays tribute to King, there is no indication he intends to participate in any public services before returning to Washington in the afternoon.

The absence of volunteer plans by Trump is especially glaring as he faces accusations of racism following reports that he made derogatory comments about Haiti and African nations.

He has since denied those reports and on Sunday told reporters, “I am the least racist person you will ever interview.”

But his refusals have done little to stem criticism from leaders at King’s former church in Atlanta. As Molly Samuel of member station WABE reports, the Rev. Raphael Warnock addressed the congregation gathered Monday morning at the Ebenezer Baptist Church saying, “I was still reeling in the reports just hours earlier about a volcanic eruption of hate speech spewing out of the mouth of the same man.”

Warnock called on the president to repent. “A proclamation without an apology is hypocrisy,” he said to widespread applause.

Several members of Congress, mostly Democrats, took to Twitter to relay what they were doing in honor of King.

Illinois Sen. Dick Durbin joined City Year Chicago volunteers.

California Sen. Kamala Harris attended a Times Up event in Los Angeles, and served as the grand marshal of the Martin Luther King Jr. Parade in South LA, one of the biggest in the nation.

New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker launched a new podcast called, “Lift Every Voice.” His first guest was Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga.

While Vice President Mike Pence’s also remained under the radar on Monday, he and his wife Karen visited the MLK memorial on Sunday. They laid a wreath of their own at the statue of Dr. King.

Ronald Reagan signed the bill that made King’s birthday a national holiday in 1983, and it was first observed in 1987. In 1994, under Bill Clinton, Congress designated the day as a Day of National Service. Since then presidents have undertaken various public service endeavors to mark King’s birthday and the legacy he left behind.

George W. Bush volunteered at Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Library in Washington, D.C., and Barack Obama helped out at a homeless shelter.

Dr. King, shot dead 50 years ago in April, would have turned 89 today.

Google App Goes Viral Making An Art Out Of Matching Faces To Paintings

Jan 16, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on Google App Goes Viral Making An Art Out Of Matching Faces To Paintings

Google’s app matching faces to famous paintings went viral prompting, a flurry of selfies over the weekend.

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Google’s app matching faces to famous paintings went viral prompting, a flurry of selfies over the weekend.

Andrew Burton/Getty Images

Who can say why some gimmicks take off and others flop? But the Google Arts Culture app tapped into the zeitgeist over the weekend, until it seemed like just about everyone with access to a camera phone and a social media account was seeking and sharing their famous painting doppelganger.

Forget the fact that Google launched the app and online page in 2016, allowing users to browse a trove of artwork sourced from hundreds of museums worldwide. It was the portrait feature included in last month’s update that has spun the selfies into overdrive.

The metric site App Annie said Google Arts Culture was the No. 1 free app over the weekend. And by Monday, it was still holding on to the spot.

Perhaps users can’t resist the vain pleasure of seeing and showcasing their own visages reflected back in a famous work of art.

These Apps' Creations Sure Look Like Masterworks, But Is It Art?

Or maybe it’s just fun.

It works like this: iPhone or Android users must download the app, then find the “Is your portrait in a museum?” function and take and submit their photo. Google sifts through the thousands of paintings in its database and using its computer vision software makes a match alongside a percentage of how well the two images resemble each other. (There is no explanation given about the supposed science behind this.)

As they shared their results on Twitter and Instagram, some users praised the similarities.

Some people felt the comparison was less than apt.

Others were unimpressed with the results, pointing out that the poor matches for non-white users was indicative of the lack of museum representation.

And still other fretted about the implications of Google compiling its own database of users’ faces.

In the app, the company says it only stores the selfies long enough to make the matches and won’t use the photos for any other purposes.

But the viral buzz was enough that many international would-be-users have been left frustrated. Google said on Monday the experimental feature is only available “in parts of the US,” but will be improved and expanded.

You Can Give A Robot A Paintbrush, But Does It Create Art?

Canine Or Cuisine? This Photo Meme Is Fetching

Vocalist Dolores O’Riordan, Of The Cranberries, Dies At 46

Jan 16, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on Vocalist Dolores O’Riordan, Of The Cranberries, Dies At 46

Dolores O’Riordan of the Irish rock band The Cranberries died on Monday at 46. The vocalist became internationally known in ’90s with her band’s hits such as “Linger,” “Dreams” and “Zombie.” Jim Sullivan a former, longtime music critic for The Boston Globe, remembers her life, music and legacy.

Sexual Harassment In The Church: Apology ‘Has Never Been Enough’

Jan 15, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Sexual Harassment In The Church: Apology ‘Has Never Been Enough’

In light of sexual assault allegations against a pastor at Highpoint Church in Memphis, Tenn., NPR’s Michel Martin talks to Rev. Serene Jones about patterns of sexual abuse and harassment within the church.

‘Recy Taylor’s Rape Still Haunts Us’

Jan 15, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on ‘Recy Taylor’s Rape Still Haunts Us’

In a speech at the Golden Globes, Oprah Winfrey told the story of Recy Taylor’s violent rape by six white men in 1944. Taylor, pictured above, died last month at age 97. Her attackers were never prosecuted.

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In a speech at the Golden Globes, Oprah Winfrey told the story of Recy Taylor’s violent rape by six white men in 1944. Taylor, pictured above, died last month at age 97. Her attackers were never prosecuted.

Phelan M. Ebenhack/Associated Press

Last week, Oprah Winfrey’s speech at the Golden Globes brought many in the audience to tears and to their feet. She was accepting an award for contributions to the world of entertainment, but the billionaire broadcaster and philanthropist decided to use her moment to tell the story of a far less celebrated woman: Recy Taylor.

“In 1944 Recy Taylor was a young wife and mother, she was just walking home from a church service she’d attended in Abbeville, Alabama, when she was abducted by six white men, raped and left blindfolded by the side of the road coming home from church,” Winfrey recounted on stage.

Later, a colleague reminded me that I had spoken with Taylor myself, with the help of historian Danielle McGuire, back in 2011. Taylor told me the story of that rape in her own words.

“They got me in the car and carried me straight through the woods,” she said. Afterward, they told her that if she told anyone they would kill her.

Oprah 2020? People Are Asking After Golden Globes Speech

In her speech, Winfrey added another important element to the story.

“Her story was reported to the NAACP where a young worker by the name of Rosa Parks became the lead investigator on her case, and together they sought justice. But justice wasn’t an option in the era of Jim Crow. The men who tried to destroy her were never prosecuted,” Winfrey said.

In 2011, I asked Taylor how that felt — never getting justice.

“They didn’t try to do nothing about it. I just get upset because I do my best to be nice to people, because I don’t want people to mistreat me and do me any kind of way,” she said.

Let me add a few more details that Winfrey did not have time to tell, such as how the local sheriff knew who had kidnapped Taylor but never arrested them. Or that one of the seven accomplices admitted he was there, but claimed he was just a bystander. Or the fact that eventually four of the accomplices admitted what they had done but claimed the rape was — wait for it — consensual.

There is also the way that some of the major Southern newspapers at the time all but ignored the crime against Taylor until national pressure forced their hands, or, just as evil, were complicit in passing along the false story that she was a prostitute or a willing participant.

Is it any wonder that when, after a campaign of local and national pressure finally led authorities to act, two all-white male grand juries refused to hold anyone accountable?

Taylor’s story haunts us — in part because of how she carried her pain with a strength we could still hear in her voice, but also because it is the story of many women whose names we will never know. But we know her name because she would not be kept silent. And also because another woman, Rosa Parks, along with many men, amplified her voice.

How Recy Taylor Spoke Out Against Her Rape, Decades Before #MeToo

Can I just tell you, Taylor’s story also haunts us because it is the story of many others, a few of whose names we now know and many we do not. It is the story of the men who raped her and the community and the country who raised them and shaped them.

I wonder about those young men. Did they hold doors open for their white mothers and sisters? Did they call them “ma’am” and “sister?” Did they marry and have daughters and dance at their weddings and worry about them when they came home late? I bet they did. I bet they had friends and jobs and people who spoke nice words about them at their funerals. Made excuses. Said everybody did it. It’s how we were raised. It’s just what we thought. We didn’t know it was wrong.

But they did know. At their core they had to know, because they, like Taylor, were human beings. And in treating Taylor as less than human, in refusing to recognize her as human, they left a piece of themselves on the floor of those woods where they attacked her. I would venture to say that all those who dehumanize others for the sake of their own pleasure or to protect their own power leave a piece of themselves behind as well.

To my knowledge, Taylor, who died last month just a few days shy of her 98th birthday, outlived her attackers. She died with her humanity intact. How many others will be able to say the same?

How Likely Is Someone To Sexually Harass Others? This Scale Determines

Jan 15, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on How Likely Is Someone To Sexually Harass Others? This Scale Determines

Psychologist John Pryor created a scale in the 1980s which can determine how likely a person is to sexually harass someone else.

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Psychologist John Pryor created a scale in the 1980s which can determine how likely a person is to sexually harass someone else.

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The stories of sexual assault and harassment that emerged last year seemed to touch every industry — Hollywood, hotels, restaurants, politics and news organizations, including this one. Many of those stories focused on what happened, but most didn’t or couldn’t get to the question of why: Why do some people, mainly men, sexually harass their colleagues?

Psychologist John Pryor has been thinking about this for more than three decades, and he has created a test in an effort to measure a person’s tendency to harass someone. It’s called the “Likelihood to Sexually Harass Scale.”

Pryor, who is a professor at Illinois State University, created the scale in the 1980s, a time when many researchers were looking at rape.

“There was a scale that was developed then to measure the likelihood that people would rape if they thought they could get away with it,” he says. “So that inspired me to think about sexual harassment.”

Pryor spoke with NPR’s Michel Martin about his research and his thoughts on the national conversation about harassment and the #MeToo movement.

Hollywood Women Launch Initiative To Stop Sexual Harassment

Interview Highlights

On what the scale looks at and how he created it

Now, the “Likelihood to Sexually Harass Scale” focuses only on one kind of sexual harassment, something that researchers used to call sexual coercion – a quid pro quo situation where someone is offering a bribe or maybe threatening a punishment for sexual cooperation. So I designed the “Likelihood to Sexually Harass Scale” using some common stereotypes about men in power situations. So I asked college men to imagine that they had such a job, and one of the things that let me know I was on to something when I first started working on this was that there was a high level of consistency. Men who would say that they would perform this act in one situation were highly likely to say they would do it in another situation.

On his reaction to the #MeToo moment

I’m not surprised at all that many women across all different kinds of walks of life are coming forth to say this has happened to them, because we know that the majority of women have experienced sexual harassment in the workplace. Admitting that you are a target or a victim of sexual harassment is somewhat of a stigma, but when you start to see people coming forth in public, one of the things you start to do is remove some of the stigma. When women hear other women say, “Oh this happened to me,” they think, “Yeah, it happened to me” and they’re less likely to think that they’re going to be treated negatively for coming forth and saying it happened to them.

On if there are specific characteristics harassers share

There are a series of beliefs that people have about sexual harassment that represent kind of a psychological underpinning — basically justifications for the behavior. So beliefs like women asking for it or women making false complaints. I can’t tell you how many people I’ve been interviewed by who ask me,”What about the false complaints?” Well, there are not many false complaints. There are not many complaints period. We can reduce the willingness of men to engage in sexual coercive sexual harassment by inducing them to think long and hard about perspectives of women.

NPR’s Isabel Dobrin produced this story for the Web. Adhiti Bandlamudi, NPR Kroc Fellow, produced for it for radio.

Unsealed Documents Show The Las Vegas Shooter’s Girlfriend Acted Swiftly

Jan 15, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on Unsealed Documents Show The Las Vegas Shooter’s Girlfriend Acted Swiftly

Newly-released court documents from the FBI suggest the Las Vegas shooter’s girlfriend, Marilou Danley, acted quickly after the shooting to conceal her relationship with Paddock.

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Newly-released court documents from the FBI suggest the Las Vegas shooter’s girlfriend, Marilou Danley, acted quickly after the shooting to conceal her relationship with Paddock.

Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

Newly released court documents show the Las Vegas shooter’s girlfriend deleted her Facebook account before police announced the identity of the gunman behind the deadliest mass shooting in modern history.

Marilou Danley, who was in the Philippines visiting family when Stephen Paddock killed 58 people and injured another 557 in the attack, started making changes to her Facebook account about 2 1/2 hours after the first volley of bullets rained down on people attending a music festival on the Las Vegas strip. The first calls rolled in at 10:08 p.m., according to police.

At 2:46 a.m. — about two hours and 15 minutes later — Danley deleted her account entirely.

But it wasn’t until an hour after that — 3:30 a.m. — that police released Paddock’s name to the public.

As the New York Post reports, the documents suggest Danley acted quickly after the shooting to conceal her relationship with Paddock.

Danley, who also lived with Paddock, has been adamant that she knew nothing about his plans to conduct the attack.

Several hundred pages, including more than a dozen search warrants and affidavits, were unsealed Friday by a U.S. judge in Nevada in response to a lawsuit filed by several media outlets, despite requests from law enforcement agencies that they remain sealed.

The documents lay out what investigators had learned about Paddock in the days following the shooting. But they do not provide a motive for what prompted the 64-year-old professional gambler to murder and terrorize concertgoers from 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay Hotel before killing himself.

One affidavit includes email exchanges between centralpark1@live.com, a Microsoft account that FBI authorities believe belonged to Paddock, and centralpark4804@gmail.com. (It is unclear if the FBI knows who is responsible for the latter account.) The messages were sent on July 6, 2017,

The affidavit reads:

“…[centralpark1@live.com] sent an email to centralpark4804@gmail.com which read, ‘try an ar before u buy. we have huge selection. located in the las vegas area,’ Later the day, an email was received back from centralpark4804@gmail.com to [centralpark1@live.com] that read, ‘we have a wide variety of optics and ammunition to try.’ And lastly, [centralpark1@live.com sent an email to centralpark4804@gmail.com that read, ‘for a thrill try out bumpfire ar’s with a 100 round magazine.’ Investigators believe these communications may have been related to the eventual attack that occurred at the Mandalay Bay in Las Vegas.”

The exchanges took place nearly three months before the onslaught. And CNN reports that “investigators at the time of the filing had been unable to determine if Paddock was sending emails between two accounts both belonging to himself, or was communicating with someone else.”

In addition to the two email addresses, the FBI requested and were granted warrants to search Paddock and Danley’s Facebook and Instagram accounts. Paddock’s Amazon account is also under investigation, as well as a locked phone that was found in his room at the Mandalay Bay.

The FBI has said repeatedly that Paddock acted alone. Danley has not been charged with a crime. She has been questioned by investigators several times.

The New York Post reports, “a Nevada judge is due to hear arguments Tuesday about whether Las Vegas police search warrant documents should remain sealed.”

False Missile Threat Alert Sends Hawaii Into A Panic

Jan 14, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on False Missile Threat Alert Sends Hawaii Into A Panic

Residents and tourists in Hawaii had a brief scare when a push notification warned of a false missile threat.

How Trump’s Corporate Tax Cut Is Playing Out For Wal-Mart

Jan 14, 2018   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on How Trump’s Corporate Tax Cut Is Playing Out For Wal-Mart

Companies like Wal-Mart say tax cuts are making it possible for them to boost wages. But other economic factors could also be contributing to pay increases.

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  • NPT: 2019-05-24 11:46 AM
  • EDT: 2019-05-24 02:01 AM
  • PDT: 2019-05-23 11:01 PM