Browsing articles from "December, 2017"

Louisiana Lawmaker Threatens Saints’ Tax Breaks After Anthem Protests

Dec 24, 2017   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on Louisiana Lawmaker Threatens Saints’ Tax Breaks After Anthem Protests

The New Orleans Saints kneel before the playing of the national anthem before the game against the Green Bay Packers at Lambeau Field on Oct. 22.

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The New Orleans Saints kneel before the playing of the national anthem before the game against the Green Bay Packers at Lambeau Field on Oct. 22.

Dylan Buell/Getty Images

A Louisiana state legislator wants to cut off tax breaks and other funding for the state’s only NFL franchise, the New Orleans Saints.

State Rep. Kenny Havard, a Republican, objects to player protests during the pregame national anthem. He plans to propose an amendment to strip any state funding that benefits the Saints, including free rental of the Mercedes-Benz Superdome, their home venue.

“We’re paying the Saints a lot of money to entertain us — not to get off in the weeds of, you know, political discourse,” Havard says. “They can do that, but do it on their own time.”

The controversy started last season, when San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick chose to kneel instead of stand during the national anthem in response to racial injustice and police brutality. Over the course of the 2016 season, other players joined Kaepernick’s protest by kneeling, sitting or raising a fist during the song.

Kaepernick was not offered an NFL contract in 2017, but the #TakeAKnee movement he sparked has continued without him. In September, President Trump entered the debate, saying in a speech and repeating on Twitter that the NFL should fire all players who refuse to stand for the national anthem.

How Every NFL Team Responded To Trump's National Anthem Protest Comments

The president’s comments only spurred more protests throughout the league, including by members of the Saints franchise. At the game after the president’s tweets, 10 Saints players remained on the bench for the national anthem. Since then, the team has knelt as a group before the anthem and then stood for the actual song.

Havard says removing the team’s tax breaks has had bipartisan support in the past, when the conversation focused on the league’s handling of domestic violence, concussion risk for players or team owner enrichment. But since the anthem protests began, he says, the tax debate is being perceived as a racial issue.

“Look: Slavery was however long ago, and it was a horrible thing and no one should have to go through that,” says Havard. “But it’s time that we move on as a nation.”

Havard says he believes institutional barriers to equal opportunity are gone, and he rejects the notion of an unjust society. For him, the debate over standing for the national anthem is not about how police treat African-Americans, but a question of doing what is right.

“When I see a lady coming, I open the door,” he says. “When I sit at the table, I take my hat off. When the national anthem plays, I stand.”

State Rep. Ted James, a Democrat, rejects Havard’s argument.

“This is not a conversation about Saints players being political,” James says. “This is a conversation about race.”

James represents a district in the state capital, Baton Rouge. That city became a flashpoint for the discussion about racial injustice in policing after the death of Alton Sterling, a black man who was shot by officers outside a convenience store there in 2016. No federal charges were filed in the case, and the state attorney general has not filed charges either.

Then, less then two weeks after Sterling’s death, three local police officers were killed and three others wounded in an ambush.

Baton Rouge Officers Won't Face Federal Charges In Killing Of Alton Sterling

Gunman Who Ambushed Baton Rouge Officers Searched For Police Home Addresses

James says that Baton Rouge did some tough racial reconciliation work after those events and that the debate over the anthem protests is reopening painful wounds. He is preparing for a legislative fight over the Saints funding issue.

“As a black man and as a black player, you are telling these athletes ‘go throw that ball, catch that ball, run that ball, tackle that quarterback, but you dare not say a word,’ ” says James. “That’s a plantation mentality.”

The anthem protests have prompted NFL boycotts on both sides of the issue. Baton Rouge publisher and activist Gary Chambers joined the local protests after Sterling’s killing. He says he has stopped watching the NFL in solidarity with Kaepernick’s movement.

“This man took a knee and flipped America upside down,” says Chambers.

Sitting in a Baton Rouge cafe, Chambers and a friend, businessman Geno McLaughlin, say the football players are giving voice to what African-Americans have been fighting for in communities all across the country, including their own.

McLaughlin says how you view the flag and what patriotism means to you depend on your experiences as an American.

“When I see the red stripes, I also see bloodstains,” he says. “For me and for many black people … we don’t feel the same way about the flag that [a white person] might.”

He says that doesn’t mean he hates the country.

“My people, we built this country,” he says. “So do I love the country? Absolutely.”

Chambers says Trump’s inflammatory public statements and tweets about firing the players send a clear message.

“Trump is basically telling all the other slave owners ‘keep your Negroes in check’ is what I hear,” says Chambers.

Tony Melera, manager of Sarita’s Mexican Grill Cantina, stands in front of a American flag — a gift from state Attorney General Jeff Landry — draped over the New Orleans Saints 2017 game schedule.

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Tony Melera, manager of Sarita’s Mexican Grill Cantina, stands in front of a American flag — a gift from state Attorney General Jeff Landry — draped over the New Orleans Saints 2017 game schedule.

Debbie Elliott/NPR

About 25 minutes outside Baton Rouge, the player protests have sparked a boycott from the opposite perspective.

At Sarita’s Mexican Grill Cantina in Denham Springs, nearly 50 big-screen TVs line the walls. Manager Tony Melera says diners can watch golf, pro wrestling and the Weather Channel, but never professional football. The restaurant has banned NFL games.

“There’s a time to protest,” Melera says. “They have the right to do so. But don’t take it out on national television against the flag.”

Melera, an immigrant from El Salvador, says the protests on the field send the wrong message.

“We respect the flag. We stand. And we pledge allegiance,” he says. “They make a lot more money than we do. Why do it? They’re going at it the wrong way.”

Melera says the restaurant lost some business at first; people in Louisiana take their football seriously. But Melera says they’ve also picked up new customers who support the boycott. Louisiana Attorney General Jeff Landry even gave the restaurant an American flag that now hangs over the New Orleans Saints schedule that had been posted in the bar.

The state Legislature will take up the tax break question when it reconvenes in March, in the meantime, the issue is also now in the courts. Just last week, a Saints season ticket holder sued the team for a refund, claiming he has been damaged by players using football games as a platform for protest.

Tracking Santa Tradition Is Serious Fun For NORAD

Dec 24, 2017   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on Tracking Santa Tradition Is Serious Fun For NORAD

U.S. Northern Command Chief of Staff Maj. Gen. Charles D. Luckey joins volunteers taking phone calls from children during the annual NORAD Tracks Santa Operation, at the North American Aerospace Defense Command, at Peterson Air Force Base, Colo. Photo taken on Christmas Eve, 2014.

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U.S. Northern Command Chief of Staff Maj. Gen. Charles D. Luckey joins volunteers taking phone calls from children during the annual NORAD Tracks Santa Operation, at the North American Aerospace Defense Command, at Peterson Air Force Base, Colo. Photo taken on Christmas Eve, 2014.

Brennan Linsley/AP

About 1,500 of Santa’s helpers are standing by this Christmas Eve, not at the North Pole but at the headquarters for North American Aerospace Defense Command in Colorado Springs.

As they do each year, the volunteers are fielding more than 100 thousand calls and emails from children the world-over who have questions about Santa Claus on his busiest day of the year.

NORAD is continuing a six-decade-long tradition of giving kids a little more reason to believe with its call center, where volunteers also help manage the interactive website NORAD tracks Santa Claus.

The site, which follows a graphic of Santa on his sleigh across the globe, complete with a “gifts delivered” tally, receives visitors from more than 200 countries and territories, according to NORAD. Live updates on his whereabouts are provided in seven languages.

The Colorado Springs Gazette reports the site had more than 60 million visits last year. “The numbers keep on growing,” Canadian Navy Lt. Marco Chouinard told the newspaper.

Outside its Christmas duties, NORAD — jointly staffed by the Canadian and American militaries — is tasked with detecting aerospace threats to protect North America from air attacks. And the group says it relies on its resources to keep up with Santa’s fleet flock of reindeer, “through satellite systems, high-powered radars and jet fighters.”

The heartwarming and oft-reported tale of just how NORAD’s Santa operation came to be begins in 1955 with a typo in a Colorado Springs newspaper.

“Hey, Kiddies!” the Sears advertisement read over an image of Santa. “Call me on my private phone and I will talk to you personally any time day or night, or come in and visit me at Sears Toyland.” Signed, Santa Claus.

Except Sears misprinted the phone number and accidentally gave out Col. Harry Shoup’s secret hotline at the Continental Air Defense Command, today known as NORAD.

NORAD's Santa Tracker Began With A Typo And A Good Sport

In 2014, Shoup’s children talked to StoryCorps about what happened next.

After Shoup answered the phone, his daughter, Pam Farrell, recalled, “There was a small voice that just asked, ‘Is this Santa Claus?’ “

Farrell’s sister, Terri Van Keuren, says her dad thought it had to be a prank. And amid Cold War tensions and fears of potential nuclear disaster, Shoup wasn’t happy about it.

But then he heard crying on the other end of the line.

“And Dad realized that it wasn’t a joke,” Van Keuren says. “So he talked to him, ho-ho-ho’d and asked if he had been a good boy and, ‘May I talk to your mother?’ And the mother got on and said, ‘You haven’t seen the paper yet? There’s a phone number to call Santa. It’s in the Sears ad.’ Dad looked it up, and there it was, his red phone number. And they had children calling one after another, so he put a couple of airmen on the phones to act like Santa Claus.”

And thus a Christmas tradition was born.

But it’s fun that NORAD takes seriously, having become the Defense Department’s biggest single public outreach program, according to Politico.

NORAD provides a 14-page internal handbook outlining the operation, including such Santa statistics as when he completed his first flight (believed to be Dec. 24, 343 A.D.) and providing talking points for the question that can leave parents squirming: “Is Santa Claus real?”

“Historical data and more than 60 years of NORAD tracking information lead us to believe Santa Claus is alive and well in the hearts of people throughout the world,” the handbook advises.

Volunteers take a few dozen calls during their two-hour shifts on Christmas Eve.

“As soon as you’re hanging up there’s another kid wanting to talk to you,” Preston Schlachter, NORAD’s Track Santa program manager and its director of community outreach told Politico. “One of the coolest things I like about the program is the multi-generational aspect of it. We are seeing feedback on social media, people who call in and tell us they tracked Santa when they were kids and they’ve introduced it to their kids and now they’re introducing it to their grandkids.”

NORAD Tracks Santa’s Facebook page shows what is happening live inside the operations center and has nearly two million likes, while its Twitter account has more than 150 thousand followers.

Want to get in touch? The email address is: noradtrackssanta@outlook.com and the phone number is: 1-877-HI-NORAD (1-877-446-6723).

Panelist Questions

Dec 23, 2017   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Panelist Questions

Wait Wait Gift Guide; Fishy Noises.

Fresh Air Weekend: NPR’s Robert Siegel; 2017 In Music; ‘Quest’

Dec 23, 2017   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Fresh Air Weekend: NPR’s Robert Siegel; 2017 In Music; ‘Quest’

Kendrick Lamar performs in New York City on Sept. 14, 2017. Critic Ken Tucker says Lamar’s album DAMN captured the collective mood of the year.

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Kendrick Lamar performs in New York City on Sept. 14, 2017. Critic Ken Tucker says Lamar’s album DAMN captured the collective mood of the year.

Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images for Clara Lionel Foundation

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

NPR’s Robert Siegel Reflects On What It Was Like To ‘Grow Up On The Air’: The longtime host of All Things Considered will retire in January. NPR had only been on the air for five years when Siegel started in 1976. “So we really could make it up as we went along,” he says.

Ken Tucker Looks Back On 2017 In Music: Fresh Air‘s music critic presents his annual list of favorite music — along with some thoughts about the rock, pop and country stars who died in 2017.

A Filmmaker’s ‘Quest’ For A Quiet Family Portrait Is Pierced By Unforeseen Trauma: Jonathan Olshefski spent 10 years filming Christopher Rainey and his family, who run a recording studio in a working-class African-American section of North Philadelphia. Then their daughter was shot.

You can listen to the original interviews here:

NPR’s Robert Siegel Reflects On What It Was Like To ‘Grow Up On The Air’

Ken Tucker Looks Back On 2017 In Music

A Filmmaker’s ‘Quest’ For A Quiet Family Portrait Is Pierced By Unforeseen Trauma

Fire Shutters London Zoo And Kills At Least One Animal

Dec 23, 2017   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on Fire Shutters London Zoo And Kills At Least One Animal

Firefighters at the London Zoo on Saturday, where an early morning fire killed at least one animal.

Dominic Lipinski/AP


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Firefighters at the London Zoo on Saturday, where an early morning fire killed at least one animal.

Dominic Lipinski/AP

When a fire broke out around 6 a.m. local time Saturday at the ZSL London Zoo, keepers living on-site moved quickly to evacuate the animals’ enclosures, moving them to safety before firefighters’ arrival, according to the zoo.

Despite their efforts, a 9-year-old aardvark named Misha died in the blaze and four meerkats were missing as of early Saturday afternoon local time.

“At the moment we’re not certain what has happened to the meerkats but I’m not optimistic at this stage, unfortunately,” Dominic Jermey, the zoo’s Director General told BBC TV.

“We are all naturally devastated by this, but are immensely grateful to the fire brigade, who reacted quickly to the situation to bring the fire under control,” the zoo said in a statement.

More than 70 firefighters came to battle the blaze that broke out around the Animal Aventure Cafe and spread to a nearby shop and petting zoo, the London Fire Brigade said.

“When they arrived our crews were faced with a very well developed fire,” Station Manager David George with the London Fire Brigade said in a statement. “They worked incredibly hard in arduous conditions to bring it under control as quickly as possible and to stop it from spreading to neighbouring animal enclosures.”

After three hours on the scene, firefighters were able to extinguish the flames.

The BBC reports one person was taken to the hospital and several others were treated at the scene for minor injuries.

“Those staff who were first on the scene have been treated here for shock and smoke inhalation,” the zoo said.

The cause of the fire remains under investigation and the zoo said it would work closely with firefighters to ascertain what happened.

The other animals in the vicinity of the flames are being monitored by veterinarians, who will continue to keep a watch over them in the coming days, according to the zoo.

The Zoological Society of London opened the facility in 1828, making it the world’s oldest scientific zoo. Today thousands of different species call the zoo home.

Misha was “one of the attraction’s best-loved animals,” reports Reuters.

The aardvark, Afrikaans for “earth pig,” eats ants and termites and has powerful claws allowing it “to dig faster than multiple people with shovels,” says the zoo. They are nocturnal creatures, spending their days in cool burrows, in part to evade predators.

The zoo remained closed on Saturday but said that after consulting with fire experts it would reopen on Sunday.

White Christmas Forecast For Some From Wyoming Through Maine

Dec 23, 2017   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on White Christmas Forecast For Some From Wyoming Through Maine

People from the Great Plains through New England have a good chance of getting a white Christmas this year.

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People from the Great Plains through New England have a good chance of getting a white Christmas this year.

Elise Amendola/AP

That white lie about snow on Christmas, “just like the ones I used to know,” is probably going to remain a nostalgic lyric for most of the country. But for millions of people along the projected path of a system forming Saturday in the Great Plains that is forecast to become a nor’easter in New England by Monday, a white Christmas is looking more like a reality.

“We are going to have a decent swath of snow,” meteorologist Marc Chenard with the National Weather Service tells NPR.

Beginning Saturday, a couple of inches are expected in Wyoming, Colorado and Nebraska.

As the system shifts eastward by Christmas Eve, it is forecast to blanket parts of the Midwest, including Illinois, Michigan and Indiana.

Chicago should get 2 to 3 inches; Kansas City, Mo., 1 to 2 inches, Chenard says.

The system is then expected to bring the highest accumulations to central and northern New England when it re-forms off the coast as a nor’easter on Christmas Day, bringing “probably quite a bit of snow — 6-plus inches,” Chenard says.

Portland, Maine, and Burlington, Vt., are both forecast to get a half-foot each.

But snow in southern New England is less certain, with Boston predicted to get perhaps 1 to 3 inches, although it is possible the storm could shift away from the city.

New York City “is on the edge,” Chenard says. It will likely be warm enough for mainly rain, but “there could be a little bit of snow that tries to mix in and maybe gives some light accumulations on Christmas.”

Despite Americans’ unending hope of waking up to snow on Dec. 25 — blame Bing Crosby’s 1942 classic — bare grounds are bound to be the norm for most of the country on most Christmas mornings. Only somewhere around one-quarter of the contiguous United States is usually snow-covered on Christmas, reports USA Today, citing AccuWeather.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has put together a map of the places that have the best odds of experiencing a white Christmas.

“The places where one is most likely to experience both snow on the ground and falling snow are in the Sierras and Cascades, on the leeward side of the Great Lakes, and in northern New England,” NOAA says. “At high elevations of the Rocky Mountains and at most locations between the northern Rockies and New England, the probability of measurable snow depth is greater than 50%, while the probability of snowfall is generally less than 25%.”

Not surprisingly, “snow is at best extremely rare” in Southern California, the lower elevations of the Southwest and Florida.

But it never hurts to dream.

Locals In Upstate New York Town Fight To Keep Mall From Shuttering

Dec 22, 2017   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Locals In Upstate New York Town Fight To Keep Mall From Shuttering

All across the country, shopping malls are going extinct. Online shopping has made it hard for big retail chains to compete, leaving some malls mostly empty. But in the upstate New York town of Massena, people are starting to fight that trend — by filling up their local mall with businesses they started themselves.

North Country Public Radio’s Lauren Rosenthal (@laurenthal) has the story.

How An American Became Santa In A Little Town In France

Dec 22, 2017   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on How An American Became Santa In A Little Town In France

Christmas pageant in Normandy, France.

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Aurelie Garat still can’t get over how she found her Pere Noel this year. She’s the Christmas pageant organizer for the tiny Normandy town of Vimoutiers.

“I was parking when I saw a nice young man with a beautiful beard sitting in his car on the phone,” says Garat. “So I said to him, your beard speaks to me. Would you be our Father Christmas this year?”

Garat says they had been looking everywhere and had almost given up hope. She says it was as if this Pere Noel — as the French call Santa Claus — just fell out of the sky.

That heaven-sent Santa is 66-year-old retired American photographer Tom Haley, who happens to be fixing up a house he recently bought near Vimoutiers. Haley says he wasn’t actually so surprised by Garat’s request.

Retired American photographer Tom Haley, 66, portrays Santa during a pageant in Normandy, France.

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Retired American photographer Tom Haley, 66, portrays Santa during a pageant in Normandy, France.

Eleanor Beardsley/NPR

“For the last several years now I’ll be walking along in Paris or anywhere,” he says, “and kids will all of a sudden stop in their tracks like they see Santa Claus.”

After Haley is helped into a century-old red felt hood and cape, he takes his place in a carriage pulled by a donkey. He’s surrounded by lots of children dressed as elves and characters from the French fairy tales of Charles Perrault.

With bells jingling, the joyous party sets off down the street. They are soon joined by an organ grinder.

Excited children wave from windows. Others stop and gape from the sidewalk.

Haley portrays Pere Noel and sits with children on his lap.

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Haley portrays Pere Noel and sits with children on his lap.

Eleanor Beardsley/NPR

After a stop at the retirement home to give out chocolates and sing a few songs, the little pageant arrives in the town square. There’s a Christmas market and a big comfy chair awaiting Pere Noel.

With a long line in front of him, Haley begins by taking each child on his knee.

Six-year-old Luna tells Haley she wants Barbie dolls.

There are other, less young residents of Vimoutiers who also visit Santa for a talk.

Eighty-eight-year-old Andree Boursier tells Haley she worked her whole life making cheese.

She refuses to sit in his lap, but assures him that she still believes in Pere Noel.

Haley has a connection to Normandy that goes back to his father, who landed here on D-Day plus two. He says in the 1990s he and his father returned and were able to find the farm where his company bivouacked.

Haley and Andree Boursier, 88, pose for photos. She says she still believes in Pere Noel.

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Haley and Andree Boursier, 88, pose for photos. She says she still believes in Pere Noel.

Eleanor Beardsley/NPR

“We knocked on the door and this older gentleman answered and I explained to him what we were doing there and that my father had landed on Omaha Beach,” Haley says. “And the guy just sort of broke down and grabbed my father in his arms and hugged him. I mean it was incredible.”

Today Vimoutier has a Muslim community. Many emigrated from Morocco in the decades after World War II. Loubna Sadkaoui has her children participate in the Christmas pageant because she thinks it’s important to share in each other’s holidays and cultures.

“It shows respect and tolerance,” she says. “When it’s Ramadan people also celebrate with us.”

Sadkaoui says it’s wonderful to have an American Pere Noel this year. It gives them another culture to celebrate.

How Airfare Is Changing

Dec 22, 2017   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on How Airfare Is Changing

1277.10

Our own Stacey Vanek Smith had to pay through the nose to fly home for Christmas. And not just because it was Christmas — her ticket was way more expensive than usual.

As we say in the news business: Stacey is not alone. Airfare dynamics have changed a ton in the past few years.

On today’s show: Why it’s getting cheaper to fly to some types of cities and more expensive to fly to others. Also: Why Stacey will probably get a better deal next year.

Music by Drop Electric. Find us: Twitter/ Facebook.

Subscribe to our show on Apple Podcasts, PocketCasts and NPR One.

Bruce McCandless, First Astronaut To Fly Untethered In Space, Has Died

Dec 22, 2017   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on Bruce McCandless, First Astronaut To Fly Untethered In Space, Has Died

On Feb. 12, 1984, Bruce McCandless ventured unrestrained away from the safety of ship, which no previous astronaut had done. He could do it because of a brand-new nitrogen jet-propelled backpack.

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On Feb. 12, 1984, Bruce McCandless ventured unrestrained away from the safety of ship, which no previous astronaut had done. He could do it because of a brand-new nitrogen jet-propelled backpack.

NASA

NASA astronaut Bruce McCandless has died at the age of 80, NASA announced Friday. You may not know his name, but you most likely have seen him in one of the most famous pictures ever taken in space. In 1984, McCandless strapped on a jet-powered backpack and flew away from the shuttle, by himself, untethered, with Earth as a backdrop. It was the first time an astronaut ever floated free in space and McCandless helped develop the technology.

McCandless had been an astronaut for a long time before he first flew in space aboard the shuttle. His was one of the voices that kept the first moon-landing crew in touch with mission control in 1969, telling Neil Armstrong, “There are a lot of us down here that would be willing to come along.”

While supporting other missions and waiting his turn, he helped design what became to be known as the MMU — the manned maneuvering unit.

McCandless first went to space in 1984 aboard the shuttle Challenger and took these jet-powered backpacks along. During the mission, McCandless climbed into the 300-pound contraption and slowly eased out of the shuttle’s cargo bay. This time, it was mission controllers on the ground saying to him, “You have a lot of envious people watching you. Looks like you’re having a lot of fun up there.”

Bruce McCandless, mission specialist aboard the shuttle Challenger in February 1984, looks at a map showing the path of the spaceship.

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Bruce McCandless, mission specialist aboard the shuttle Challenger in February 1984, looks at a map showing the path of the spaceship.

AP

Armstrong was on McCandless’ mind when he took that first untethered foray into space. More than three decades later, in an NPR interview, he remembered precisely what he said, “It may have been one small step for Neil. But it’s a heckuva big leap for me.”

“My wife happened to be at mission control at the time and she says the laughter literally brought down the house. Which was sort of what I had intended because I wanted to loosen things up a little,” he recalled.

Relative to Earth, he was flying almost 18,000 miles per hour. But relative to the shuttle — he was moving at a leisurely one-foot per second. He said he wasn’t nervous. He found it effortless.

He had trained for that moment for years, ready for anything — the suit’s nitrogen propulsion system failing or problems communicating with the shuttle. But what he wasn’t prepared for was the temperature in the suit: “I got quite cold. My teeth were chattering. I was shivering,” he said.

The suit was designed so astronauts could work strenuously, but for that first six-hour test, he had only moved a little more than 300 feet away from the shuttle when the famous picture was taken, with Earth and space in the background.

“I had the gold sun visor down. So that in principle, people could imagine themselves inside of there instead of me,” he said.

McCandless said he was most proud that, later in life, children came up to him to say they’d seen the picture. He hoped it would inspire the next generation of explorers. “I like to encourage folks to look at that and say, ‘Well, I can do better than that.'”

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