Browsing articles from "July, 2016"

Volleyball Plus Soccer Makes Footvolley

Jul 31, 2016   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Volleyball Plus Soccer Makes Footvolley



MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The 2016 Summer Olympic Games begin next Friday, but sports fans might be drawn to a game taking place outside of the Olympics on the beaches of Rio. It is footvolley. And, as the name implies, it’s a combination of volleyball and soccer. It’s catching on in the U.S. And, as NPR’s Greg Allen reports, it will get international exposure during this year’s games in Brazil.

GREG ALLEN, BYLINE: On a beach in Sunny Isles in a town just north of Miami, Benny Astorga is putting members of the USA footvolley team through training drills.

BENNY ASTORGA: Good. Come on. Let’s go. Put it away. Good.

ALLEN: He tosses up a volleyball as the players use their feet then their chest to keep the ball in play, and finally a head shot puts it over the net. It’s basically volleyball played soccer-style. Astorga says that’s how the game got started in Brazil in the mid-1960s. Soccer players were looking for a game to play on the beach.

ASTORGA: It was banned to play football on the sand. They saw some open-court nets, decided, you know, go over there and see who could keep it up the longest and a sport grew out of it, you know?

MELONY POVIONES: People see it, and they’re like – they’re in awe because they’re like, oh, my goodness, I’ve never seen it before.

ALLEN: Melony Poviones is one of the women on the USA footvolley team set to compete in Rio. The U.S. team will be one of 23 countries taking part in a competition that’s not officially part of the Olympics, but instead is billed as a cultural event. Poviones is from South Florida where the Brazilian-born game is gaining popularity. She’s 24 and grew up playing soccer. She discovered footvolley while recovering from a knee injury.

POVIONES: I used to see the guys playing, so I kind just asked one day. I was like, hey, can I join? Because I played soccer my entire life. So they were like yeah, cool, jump in. And I was – I started getting the hang of it, and I started to love it.

ALLEN: Another team member Sergio Menezes was born in Brazil, grew up in the U.S. He was inspired to get serious about the game nearly 20 years ago. One day, he and some Brazilian friends were on the beach when they were challenged to a game of footvolley. He recalls the challenger, a Brazilian in Miami on vacation, beat them badly.

SERGIO MENEZES: So he just got frustrated. He said you guys are terrible. You know, you’re not real Brazilians. So, that kind of stuck. It was me, a couple of friends of mine. We were all Brazilians looking at each other going, man, we got to learn this sport.

ALLEN: Within a few years, Menezes was into footvolley in a big way. He helped found the U.S. Footvolley Association and began holding tournaments. Later, he and others secured a national sponsor and began the Pro-Footvolley Tour. Menezes is a player, but also a footvolley promoter. It’s a fast-paced game, he says, with a lot of fun, excitement and potential for growth of beach volleyball. In footvolley, the money play, the one that gets fans on their feet, is something called the shark attack.

MENEZES: The shark attack is when a player thrusts his body sort of like he’s going towards the net and at the very last second, he slams it with the bottom of his foot. And it’s very hard to defend because it goes straight down. Yeah, that’s our slam dunk.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED ANNOUNCER: Goes up and…

(APPLAUSE)

ALLEN: That’s a shark attack earlier this year at a pro-footvolley event on Florida’s Hollywood Beach. Menezes helped convince Brazilian footvolley groups to push for an event at this year’s Olympics. The Brazilian Olympic Committee agreed to an international tournament in late August at the beach volleyball arena on Copacabana Beach. It’s not quite an Olympic event, not even an official demonstration sport, but Menezes and other footvolley enthusiasts are thrilled.

MENEZES: What it is it’s when a guy and a girl started going out, and they don’t know what it is. But there’s something there. OK? That’s what it is. I mean, if you’re in Rio and you’re in the Olympic stadium, it’s an amazing sport, and the world’s going to see it. I mean, it’s the first step.

ALLEN: The first step for a fledgling sport that Menezes hopes eventually to see as a medal event at a future Olympics. Greg Allen, NPR News, Miami.

Copyright © 2016 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

‘Picturing Children’ Documents African-American Childhoods

Jul 31, 2016   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on ‘Picturing Children’ Documents African-American Childhoods



MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now, you just heard a brief mention of the Smithsonian’s newest museum, the National Museum of African-American History and Culture. It opens to the public in two months. As part of the museum’s launch, founding director, Lonnie Bunch is overseeing the publication of a series of picture books featuring photographs from the museum’s collection. It’s called “Double Exposure.”

Previous installments focused on pictures from the Civil Rights movement and portraits of African-American women through the years. The most recent is called “Picturing Children.” It offers a window into what it’s been like for African-American children to grow up over the last century. When I spoke with Lonnie Bunch recently, I asked him how this book even came about, especially in the middle of working on a project of this scale.

LONNIE BUNCH: I realized that when we began to build the museum, one of the most important things we could do was to make history accessible. And one of the best ways to do that – it was through photography. That would allow people to sort of see the history from a human scale, and it would allow people to be able to look within their own families and realize how important their photography is.

So we thought about photography as crucial. And then as we looked at all that was happening with children, we thought it was really important to take time to look historically how children have been depicted and to give people a sense to understand that the strength of a nation is tied to how well they treat their children.

MARTIN: One of the things that you say in the foreword is that this series of books echoes the efforts of W. E. B. Du Bois who presented to readers of The Crisis images of African-Americans. He was very committed to that. And one of the things you say about that is that it was also important to counteract this kind of pervasive image of African-Americans as kind of poor and downtrodden because you said that it would threaten to overwhelm African-American self-perception. Could you talk a little bit about that?

BUNCH: I think what’s important to me about these images we’ve chosen – some were taken by African-American families, which really speak volumes about, despite one’s economic status, how one wanted to picture themselves, how one wanted to show that nothing would stop them from being a family, that despite economic circumstances, they still could dress right, speak properly. So in some ways, part of what is important to us is that this book allows us – for the public – to look at these images and get a sense of how African-Americans saw themselves.

MARTIN: It does cover a lot of ground, though, I mean, there are pictures of enslaved families. There are pictures of children picking cotton. There are also pictures of children with President Obama. There are pictures of Serena and Venus Williams as children, you know, playing with their dad, and also children with signs that say Black Lives Matter. What was your kind of philosophy in choosing which pictures you would select? I mean, from – you have – what? – some 20,000 pictures in the collection?

BUNCH: That’s correct. We have over 20,000. And, obviously, we wanted to do a sweep of history. We wanted to not just focus on contemporary, but to look back. And part of what we wanted to do by looking at some of the images of enslavement is really talk about that despite that time on the cross, family was so important.

There’s an amazing image that was taken in Alexandria, Va., of black women who were enslaved. But you see them holding their children. You see the sense that how important family has always been or the fact that children have always played a role in helping to protest, to move America forward, whether it’s the pictures of children at the children’s march in Birmingham in the 1960s or young children holding signs for black life matters today. The reality is that for African-American children, sometimes it’s been hard just to be a child, that you’ve had to both be part of the workforce, and you’ve also had to be part of the struggle for fairness.

MARTIN: Is there any one of these pictures that is just really close to your heart?

BUNCH: Well, there’s a picture of – probably taken in the 1940s of people picking cotton, and you see the adults bent from the weight of picking that cotton and the labor. And then you see a picture of a child who’s got almost a bemused look on his face. It’s almost as if he is sort of trying to understand what the future lies before him.

And that, for me, that picture is so powerful because here you see the child’s innocence. You see the sort of playfulness in his face, but you also see the future that’s in front of him, which is because the way society has defined him, that he would probably later in his life be picking cotton just like those other adults.

MARTIN: Is there anyone that makes you smile every time you see it?

BUNCH: Oh, what I love is the way these families dress their kids. And so some of the images of these young kids with their short pants and their well-polished shoes and they’re perfectly combed hair – because it reminds me of being a kid and my mother dragging me to get my portrait taken, how much I hated the fact that you stand still and make a fake smile. It reminds me of a historical tradition of people capturing the memory of their child and using that image as a way to project an optimistic future.

MARTIN: Yeah, there is this – it’s interesting, though, because we’ve been learning more about just how important photography has been to the African-American experience. I think we’ve recently learned that, you know, Frederick Douglass, for example, was the most photographed American of his time. That push and pull, though, between wanting to show the best, however one defines the best – right? – and wanting to be very real about the truth of the hardships that push and pull I think you see in this collection.

BUNCH: Oh, I think that’s absolutely right because what’s important to also realize is that African-Americans, sometimes in a very sophisticated way like Frederick Douglass or W. E. B. Du Bois, other times in an intuitive way recognize that they had to use the best technologies in order to struggle for freedom and fairness. So photography becomes that tool as early as the 19th century to present issues of strength or images of strength or to present sort of images that would motivate people to struggle for equality.

And it goes all the way through the Civil Rights movement. I mean, one of the most innovative parts of the Civil Rights movement was utilizing the media photography and television in order to sort of bring home to people thousands of miles away the reality of the lives they lived.

MARTIN: Well, Mr. Bunch, before we let you go, the museum is opening in just two months. It’s scheduled to open on September 24 and can you just describe for those of us who are not founding museum directors…

(LAUGHTER)

MARTIN: …What it’s like to be so close to opening after all these years?

BUNCH: This is one of the most exciting and most humbling times candidly in my life. I mean, the fact that it’s been 11 years since we began this initiative and the fact that we are now so close is very meaningful. It’s meaningful because of the way the public has embraced us. I can’t go anywhere without somebody pulling out a membership card and saying I support the museum or I’ll sit on an airplane and somebody will say, God, that building is so beautiful.

And what it really reminds you of is that all the efforts that no one will ever know but the staff that have worked here – all those efforts are really worth it because we’ve been able to create a space that we hope that as long as there’s an America that space will be there to help people wrestle with issues of race, to better understand who we are as Americans and ultimately to find moments that make them pause and moments that make them smile.

MARTIN: That’s Lonnie Bunch. He is the founding director of the Smithsonian Museum of African-American History and Culture. We’ve been speaking with him about the publication of “Picturing Children.” It’s the fourth book in a series of publications “Double Exposure,” featuring photographs from the museum’s extensive collection. We spoke with him at his offices, and I hope we’ll speak again closer to the opening of the museum, Lonnie Bunch.

BUNCH: I’m always there for you.

Copyright © 2016 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

From ‘The Water’s Edge To The Cutting Edge’: Fish Skeletons, CT Scans And Engineering

Jul 31, 2016   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on From ‘The Water’s Edge To The Cutting Edge’: Fish Skeletons, CT Scans And Engineering

Giant clingfish (Chlorosichismus dentex) with limpet in the gut.

Giant clingfish (Chlorosichismus dentex) with limpet in the gut.

TAMU Collection/Courtesy of Adam Summers


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TAMU Collection/Courtesy of Adam Summers

Adam Summers used to trade Snickers bars to get free CT scans of dead fish.

He likes fish. A lot.

Summers is a professor at the University of Washington in the biology department and School of Aquatic and Fisheries Sciences.

“I’ve always been a fish guy,” he says. “It’s just been in my blood since I was as small as I can remember.” Summers was a scientific consultant on Finding Nemo and did similar work with Finding Dory.

He describes himself as a biomechanist — he studies “how physics and engineering govern some parts of biology.” Some of that refers to, for example, studying how humans could use ideas from the structure of a fish skeleton to design an underwater vehicle.

“A lot of what I do is in the realm of what’s called biomimetics,” Summers tells NPR. “I’m looking to the sea for inspiration, for biomimetics solutions to technical problems.”

Scan of an armored poacher, Xeneretmus triacanthus.

Scan of an armored poacher, Xeneretmus triacanthus.

UW Collection/Courtesy of Adam Summers


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UW Collection/Courtesy of Adam Summers

He’s based on an island about 60 miles north of Seattle, at the University of Washington’s Friday Harbor Laboratories. The lab is only a short walk from the water — from “the water’s edge to the cutting edge,” Summers says. As part of his work at the lab, his team is trying to make 3-D CT scans of all 33,000 varieties of fish.

So, why?

Researchers like Summers want to understand how fish work. To do that, he says, “one of the very, very useful things is to understand exactly what the skeleton looks like. It is shockingly complex. Your skull is just a few bones. Fish skulls are dozens and dozens of bones.”

That’s where the CT scans come in. The machines are usually used to see the insides of humans. Many years ago, Summers wanted to see the insides of fish.

“I would beg, borrow and bribe my way to getting good CT scan data,” he says. “I would go with my pockets full of Snickers bars to a particular scan tech who worked at night and didn’t mind if I showed up with a damp bag full of stingrays. And I would trade Snickers bars for free CT scans.”

Bull sculpin, Enophrys taurina.

Bull sculpin, Enophrys taurina.

OSU Collection/Courtesy of Adam Summers


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OSU Collection/Courtesy of Adam Summers

Eventually, private donors ponied up funds for a small CT scanner for the Friday Harbor lab, a move Summers called “transformative.”

Now the goal is to create a digital library with 3-D images of all 33,000 species of fish. Summers says it can be done in about three years by scanning multiple fish at the same time.

“I love the idea of getting all this stuff up on the Web for anyone to access for any purpose,” he says. “To allow the general public and every scientist out there to just download these data is fabulous.”

In three months, he says the team has put up scans for more than 500 fish. He predicts the project will save money — he says research agencies frequently scan the same species more than once. Having the data open for anyone will eliminate any research overlap.

“Every aspect of fish is absolutely fascinating,” Summers says. “It has just an unbelievable amount of information there to be picked out.”

Skydiver Luke Aikins Sets Record For Highest Jump Without Parachute

Jul 31, 2016   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on Skydiver Luke Aikins Sets Record For Highest Jump Without Parachute

Luke Aikins jumps from a helicopter during his training on Monday, in Simi Valley, Calif. After more than 25 years of skydiving, Aikins ditched his chute to free fall 25,000 feet above the desert terrain.i

Luke Aikins jumps from a helicopter during his training on Monday, in Simi Valley, Calif. After more than 25 years of skydiving, Aikins ditched his chute to free fall 25,000 feet above the desert terrain.

Jae C. Hong/AP


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Jae C. Hong/AP

Luke Aikins jumps from a helicopter during his training on Monday, in Simi Valley, Calif. After more than 25 years of skydiving, Aikins ditched his chute to free fall 25,000 feet above the desert terrain.

Luke Aikins jumps from a helicopter during his training on Monday, in Simi Valley, Calif. After more than 25 years of skydiving, Aikins ditched his chute to free fall 25,000 feet above the desert terrain.

Jae C. Hong/AP

Luke Aikins on Saturday became the first skydiver to jump from a plane without a parachute or wingsuit and live to tell the story.

In a stunt called, “Heaven Sent,” the 42-year-old daredevil leaped 25,000 feet to Earth –- setting the world record for the highest jump. To accomplish this feat, Aikins had to direct his body in free fall using only the air currents around him to land safely on the high-tech 10,000-square-foot net (about a third the size of a football field) laid out to catch him.

The jump was aired live on television via the Fox network during an hour-long special. Aikins fell for about two minutes above the California desert, appearing to soar effortlessly, arms extended, face downward. And as he neared the ground, with a mere second to go, he expertly flipped onto his back and landed without incident.

At the last second of his record-setting 25,000-foot drop, Luke Aikins turns onto his back before the net safely catches his fall. The “Heaven Sent” stunt played out in Simi Valley, Calif.


MrTreknation via
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He then climbed out of the net and embraced his wife, Monica, who was among a cheering group of family and friends, including their 4-year-old son, Aikins’ dad, two brothers and a sister, who’d all anxiously watched the breathtaking spectacle.

Aikins, who said during the broadcast that he’d been preparing for this jump for two years, had previously done 18,000 parachute jumps and performed a variety of stunts, including for Ironman 3.

“Everyone is calling this my ‘coming-out jump,’ which is ironic considering I’ve been skydiving since the age of 16,” he said in a press release prior to the jump.

In fact, Aikins, whose grandfather co-founded a skydiving school after serving in World War II, is a third-generation skydiver. The family owns Skydive Kapowsin near Tacoma, Wash.

Further to his credit, Aiken is a safety and training advisor for the United States Parachute Association (USPA) where he provides advanced skydiving training to elite military Special Forces.

Early in the broadcast of “Heaven Sent,” there was almost a change in the script that might have taken away a tad of the excitement around Aikins’ jump.

According to The Associated Press, “Just before climbing into a plane to make the jump, Aikins said he had been ordered to wear a parachute but indicated he wouldn’t open it. As the plane was climbing to 25,000 feet above the drop zone he said the requirement had been lifted and he took off the chute.”

Eclectic Finnish Composer Einojuhani Rautavaara Dies At 87

Jul 29, 2016   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Eclectic Finnish Composer Einojuhani Rautavaara Dies At 87

Finnish composer Einojuhani Rautavaara, photographed in Helsinki in October, 2014.i

Finnish composer Einojuhani Rautavaara, photographed in Helsinki in October, 2014.

Martti Kainulainen/AFP/Getty Images


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Finnish composer Einojuhani Rautavaara, photographed in Helsinki in October, 2014.

Finnish composer Einojuhani Rautavaara, photographed in Helsinki in October, 2014.

Martti Kainulainen/AFP/Getty Images

Einojuhani Rautavaara, often hailed as Finland’s finest composer since Jean Sibelius, has died at age 87. The Associated Press reports that Rautavaara died Wednesday in Helsinki after complications from hip surgery.

Einojuhani Rautavaara, the elder statetsman of Finnish composers, has written a dynamic percussion concerto for Colin Currie.

A prolific artist, Rautavaara produced a wide range of works including nine operas, eight symphonies, numerous concertos, choral works and chamber music.

He was also versatile. In the 1950s, he dabbled in a kind of Stravinskian neoclassical sound. The 1960s brought about experiments in 12-tone techniques, while the following decade found elements of jazz and romanticism entering his music. His 1972 orchestral work Cantus arcticus has become a signature piece, featuring birdcalls he recorded himself in northern Finland. A trilogy of so-called “Angel” works, culminating with the Seventh Symphony (“Angel of Light”), introduced a melodically accessible and mystical final phase of Rautavaara’s music.

Rautavaara was born Oct. 9, 1928 in Helsinki. He started as a pianist and musicology student at the University of Helsinki, receiving a second degree in composition from the Sibelius Academy. In the 1950s, Sibelius, the father figure of Finnish music, called Rautavaara the most promising young composer in Finland and facilitated studies at Juilliard and Tanglewood with Aaron Copland and Roger Sessions.

“Maybe the most important experience was to live in Manhattan,” Rautavaara told NPR in 1998. “It taught much more about life to me than all those teachers about music.” In 2004, Rautavaara paid tribute to his New York days with an orchestral work, Manhattan Trilogy.

Rautavaara became a teacher himself — a lecturer, then a professor at the Sibelius Academy. Minnesota Orchestra Music Director Osmo Vänskä, who knew Rautavaara and conducts his works, says the composer was not a disciplinarian when it came to playing his music.

“He always listened to the opinions of the performers,” Vänskä said in a telephone conversation Thursday. “He wanted to give very free hands for you to find your way.”

One of Rautavaara’s first stylistic changes came in the mid-1960s, after the Fourth Symphony. “He was a tighter-minded composer in the 1950s,” Vänskä said. “He felt that he had just done enough with that type of serial music and wanted to open his mind.”

Another shift came in the 1980s, when he found his second wife. “It was obvious the second marriage changed his life,” Vänskä said. “That was a happy time in his life and you can hear that in his music.”

Although Rautavaara’s music routinely took on a serious tone, he cultivated a sense of humor.

The “Angel of Light” symphony was about angels, but Vänskä recalled the composer explaining, “We have to remember that there are not only white angels but there are black angels too,” and tacking on an evil little cackle. The symphony was commissioned by the Bloomington Symphony Orchestra and premiered in 1995. Four years later Rautavaara fulfilled another American commission, composing his Eighth Symphony for the centenary of the Philadelphia Orchestra.

With an assortment of styles over many decades where does someone new to Rautavaara’s music start? Vänskä has some ideas. From the earlier works, Vänskä recommends A Requiem in Our Time, a piece for brass ensemble that won the Thor Johnson Contest in 1954 and brought the composer some international acclaim. “It’s a piece I’ve conducted many times,” Vänskä says. “It has this kind of drama, but it’s always speaking to the audience.”

Vänskä’s favorite remains the Cantus arcticus: “It’s such a revolutionary idea, to go and record the birds and make them perform with an orchestra in a concert hall.”

In 2004, Rautavaara nearly died from a torn aorta, spending months in a hospital. He eventually rebounded, saying his commissions were keeping him alive. Along with many commissions, Rautavaara had strong support from the Finnish government, which named him an arts professor and paid him not to teach but only to compose.

In 2000, sitting in his garden outside Helsinki, Rautavaara told NPR that what really fueled his music was passion. “To be a composer, you have to be a fanatic,” he said. “You have to feel that composing is your mode of existence.”

Rautavaara was working on a new opera when he died. He is survived by his wife, soprano Sinikka Rautaavara, and three children.

Final Day Of The DNC: Hillary Clinton Accepts Her Party’s Nomination

Jul 29, 2016   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Final Day Of The DNC: Hillary Clinton Accepts Her Party’s Nomination

Presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine celebrate the end of the Democratic National Convention.i

Presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine celebrate the end of the Democratic National Convention.

Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images


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Presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine celebrate the end of the Democratic National Convention.

Presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine celebrate the end of the Democratic National Convention.

Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images

Hillary Clinton accepted her party’s nomination on Thursday, completing the field for an American political campaign without historical precedent.

Clinton, the first female presidential nominee for a major American party, has now officially become Republican Donald Trump’s Democratic rival for the presidency of the United States.

“It is with humility, determination and boundless confidence in America’s promise that I accept your nomination for president of the United States,” Clinton said.

Clinton’s nomination comes after a bruising primary campaign against Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders that left the Democratic Party struggling to unite.

It was one of the themes that flared often during the four days of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia. Sanders supporters disrupted the first invocation on Monday and then disrupted other proceedings with chants against war and the Trans-Pacific Partnership free trade agreement. Both former Defense Secretary Leon Panetta and retired Gen. John Allen were disrupted by chants of “No more war! No more war!”

Yellow-shirted Bernie Sanders delegates shout anti-war slogans and hold up peace signs on the convention floor.

Yellow-shirted Bernie Sanders delegates shout anti-war slogans and hold up peace signs on the convention floor.

Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call Group via Getty Images


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Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call Group via Getty Images

Thursday night, about 150 Sanders supporters dressed in bright yellow shirts occasionally chanted, but Clinton supporters quickly drowned them out with chants of “Hil-la-ry! Hil-la-ry!”

Clinton addressed them directly.

“I want you to know, I’ve heard you,” she said. “Your cause is our cause. Our country needs your ideas, energy and passion.”

Clinton summoned the early days of the nation, when the Founding Fathers met in Philadelphia. They were divided, she said, but soon they began “finding common purpose.”

“And by the time they left Philadelphia, they had begun to see themselves as one nation,” she said. “That’s what made it possible to stand up to a king. That took courage.”

Clinton’s speech was not soaring like speeches Democrats have grown accustomed to with President Obama. Instead, Clinton gave a speech grounded in specific policy proposals: She promised to overturn Citizens United — “with a constitutional amendment if necessary” — and reform the criminal justice system She promised to fight for a living wage, tuition-free college for the poor, equal pay for women, comprehensive immigration reform, gun control, and to make Wall Street and corporations “pay their fair share” in taxes.

Clinton contrasted her proposals to what she said was the vagueness of Trump’s plans and, as she has done before, went after Trump’s temperament and vision for America.

“He’s taken the Republican Party a long way from ‘Morning in America’ to ‘Midnight in America,’ ” she said. “He wants us to fear the future and fear each other.”

She added: “Now we are clear-eyed about what our country is up against. But we are not afraid.”

Clinton closed by calling for unity beyond her party. She called for Americans to come together to find solutions to the big problems facing American society.

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton takes the stage on the final night of the Democratic National Convention.

“We have to heal the divides in our country,” Clinton said. “Not just on guns. But on race, immigration and more. That starts with listening to each other, hearing each other, trying, as best we can, to walk in each other’s shoes.”

We live-blogged the last night of the Democratic National Convention. If you want a blow-by-blow keep scrolling:

Update at 12:12 a.m. ET. Clinton On Donald Trump:

Clinton took a few swipes at the Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump. This is one of the most cutting:

“Donald Trump can’t even handle the rough-and-tumble of a presidential campaign.

“He loses his cool at the slightest provocation. When he’s gotten a tough question from a reporter. When he’s challenged in a debate. When he sees a protester at a rally.

“Imagine him in the Oval Office facing a real crisis. A man you can bait with a tweet is not a man we can trust with nuclear weapons.”

Update at 10:08 p.m. ET. Chelsea Clinton Introduces Her Mom:

Chelsea Clinton introduced her mother, saying she was onstage tonight as a “very, very proud daughter.”

Clinton said her mother’s defining trait is that “regardless of what was happening in her life, she was always there for me.”

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton embraces her daughter Chelsea Clinton after being introduced on the fourth day of the Democratic National Convention.

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton embraces her daughter Chelsea Clinton after being introduced on the fourth day of the Democratic National Convention.

Drew Angerer/Getty Images


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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Clinton said that her mother would leave her notes when she went on trips and that her parents always gave her the chance to talk first at the dinner table.

“I always, always knew how deeply they loved me,” she said. “That feeling of being valued and loved — that is what my mom wants for every child. It is the calling of her life.”

Update at 9:40 p.m. ET. Retired Gen. Allen Is Interrupted:

Supporters of Bernie Sanders interrupted the speech of retired Gen. John Allen.

Allen was trying to make the case that Clinton was the best choice for commander in chief.

“I … know that with her as our commander in chief, our international relations will not be reduced to a business transaction,” Allen said. “I also know that our armed forces will not become an instrument of torture, and they will not be ordered to engage in murder or carry out other illegal activities.”

But as he spoke, Sanders supporters shouted, “No more war! No more war!” The rest of the arena drowned them out with chants of “USA! USA!”

Sometimes Allen’s speech could barely be heard in the arena.

Update at 9:21 p.m. ET. ‘You Have Sacrificed Nothing’:

Khizr Khan, whose son was killed serving in Iraq in 2004, delivered a powerful indictment of Donald Trump. He said: “Donald Trump, you’re asking Americans to trust you with their future. Let me ask you, have you even read the United States Constitution? I will gladly lend you my copy. In this document, look for the words ‘liberty’ and ‘equal protection of law.’ “

Khizr Khan, father of Humayun S. M. Khan, who was killed while serving in Iraq with the US Army, gestures as his wife looks on during the fourth and final day of the Democratic National Convention.

Khizr Khan, father of Humayun S. M. Khan, who was killed while serving in Iraq with the US Army, gestures as his wife looks on during the fourth and final day of the Democratic National Convention.

Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images


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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Khan continued to address Trump directly: “You have sacrificed nothing and no one. … We cannot solve our problems by building walls, sowing division. We are stronger together, and we will keep getting stronger when Hillary Clinton becomes our president.”

Khizr Khan, father of Humayun Khan, who was killed while serving in Iraq with the U.S. Army, gestures as his wife looks on during the final evening of the Democratic National Convention.

In some ways, Khan’s speech was reminiscent of a speech given by Pat Smith, the mother of diplomat Sean Smith, who was killed in the 2012 attacks on the consulate in Benghazi, at the Republican National Convention.

“I blame Hillary Clinton personally for the death of my son,” Smith said.

Update at 9:07 p.m. ET. ‘Fight For The Heart Of This Nation’:

The Rev. William Barber II, president of the North Carolina NAACP, brought the crowd to its feet when he called for Americans to “fight for the heart of this nation.”

Without naming Trump, Barber said:

“In this season, when some want to harden and stop the heart of our democracy, we are being called like our foremothers and -fathers to be the moral defibrillators of our time. We must shock this nation with the power of love. We must shock this nation with the power of mercy. We must shock this nation and fight for justice for all. We can’t give up on the heart of our democracy. Not now, not ever.”

Update at 8:46 p.m. ET. A Moment Of Silence For Fallen Officers:

Dallas County Sheriff Lupe Valdez made a call for police and communities to work together.

She said that she was still trying to make sense of the police shootings that happened in Dallas.

“Violence is not the answer,” she said. “Yelling and calling each other names is not going to do it. Talking within your own group in your own language only where your groups understands leads nowhere. We have to start listening to each other.”

Then she called for a moment of silence. As it came to an end and before Valdez introduced the families of fallen officers, two people in the crowd screamed, “Black lives matter!”

Update at 8:34 p.m. ET. A Message To The Disillusioned:

Jennifer Granholm, the former governor of Michigan, just received the biggest applause of the night.

She began by saying she wanted to talk to disillusioned Americans.

“Some people are worried,” she said. “Some people are angry. I get that. But the answer is not to tear our country down; it’s to build our country up. Not to build walls that keep out the rest of the world, but to keep building the industries and universities that the rest of the world wishes they could get into.”

Excitement ran high on a night that included rousing speeches, a Katy Perry performance and Clinton's big moment.

Excitement ran high on a night that included rousing speeches, a Katy Perry performance and Clinton’s big moment.

Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images


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Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images

Granholm said the only way to overcome big problems like the loss of manufacturing jobs is to do it as one people.

Donald Trump, she said, doesn’t understand that, but Clinton “gets it.”

“Our great country spans a continent, but we are all connected to each other, no matter where we live,” she said. “So when a miner in Virginia has the dignity of a new job in the advanced steel industry, we all have dignity. When the engineering student in the Sunshine State builds the solar panels of the future, we all succeed.”

Update at 7:45 p.m. ET. Excerpts Of Clinton’s Speech:

According to excerpts of the speech released by the Clinton campaign, Hillary Clinton will say that the United States is at “a moment of reckoning.”

“Powerful forces are threatening to pull us apart,” she will say. “Bonds of trust and respect are fraying. And just as with our founders there are no guarantees. It’s truly is up to us. We have to decide whether we’re going to work together so we can all rise together.”

Clinton will also outline her agenda. Here’s another excerpt:

“My primary mission as President will be to create more opportunity and more good jobs with rising wages right here in the United States. From my first day in office to my last. Especially in places that for too long have been left out and left behind. From our inner cities to our small towns, Indian Country to Coal Country. From the industrial Midwest to the Mississippi Delta to the Rio Grande Valley.”

Convention staff carry a box of signs to the upper levels of the Wells Fargo Center to hand out to the crowd.

Convention staff carry a box of signs to the upper levels of the Wells Fargo Center to hand out to the crowd.

Patrick T. Fallon/AFP/Getty Images


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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP/Getty Images

Update at 7:27 p.m. ET. ‘America Kept Its Promise’:

Rep. Joaquin Castro, of Texas, countered Donald Trump’s proposals on immigration using a personal story.

“In 1922, the only grandparent that I would ever know came to the United States from Mexico,” Castro said. “She wasn’t a rapist or a murderer. She was a 6-year-old orphan. But as a girl, she walked past storefront signs that read ‘No Dogs or Mexicans Allowed.’ Her life wasn’t easy. And she didn’t always feel welcomed. But she never stopped believing in America’s sacred promise that her sacrifices would be rewarded with opportunity for herself and her family. She kept up her part of the promise by working her whole life: baby-sitting, cooking, and cleaning houses. And the fact that her grandson is standing here on this stage tonight is proof that America kept its promise, too.”

WATCH: Muslim Father Of Fallen Soldier Tells Trump ‘You Have Sacrificed Nothing’

Jul 29, 2016   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on WATCH: Muslim Father Of Fallen Soldier Tells Trump ‘You Have Sacrificed Nothing’

Khizr Khan, father of Humayun Khan, who was killed while serving in Iraq with the U.S. Army, gestures as his wife looks on during the final evening of the Democratic National Convention.i

Khizr Khan, father of Humayun Khan, who was killed while serving in Iraq with the U.S. Army, gestures as his wife looks on during the final evening of the Democratic National Convention.

Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images


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Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images

Khizr Khan, father of Humayun Khan, who was killed while serving in Iraq with the U.S. Army, gestures as his wife looks on during the final evening of the Democratic National Convention.

Khizr Khan, father of Humayun Khan, who was killed while serving in Iraq with the U.S. Army, gestures as his wife looks on during the final evening of the Democratic National Convention.

Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images

Khizr Khan, the father of an American Muslim captain killed in Iraq, had a message for Donald Trump at the Democratic National Convention Thursday night:

“Have you ever been to Arlington cemetery? Go look at the graves of brave patriots who died defending the United States of America. You will see all faiths, genders and ethnicities. You have sacrificed nothing and no one.”

Khan is the father of Capt. Humayun Khan, a 27-year-old killed while serving in Iraq in 2004.

The elder Khan moved to the United States nearly 40 years ago. His son attended the University of Virginia, participating in ROTC before he joined the Army after graduation.

At the convention, Khan told Muslim immigrants and all immigrants to take the upcoming election seriously. He evoked the memory of his son:

“This is a historic election and I request to honor the sacrifice of my son, and on Election Day, take the time to get out and vote and vote for the healer, vote for the strongest, most qualified candidate, Hillary Clinton, not the divider.”

Khan spoke directly to Trump, in response to Trump’s calls to ban Muslims and immigrants from countries with a “proven history of terrorism.”

“Let me ask you, have you even read the United States Constitution? I will gladly lend you my copy,” he said, pulling a copy out of his jacket. In this document, look for the words ‘liberty’ and ‘equal protection of law.’ “

Watch the full video below; the speech starts about three minutes in, after a video from the Clinton campaign where the candidate speaks about Khan’s son:

FACT CHECK: Hillary Clinton’s Speech To The Democratic Convention, Annotated

Jul 29, 2016   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on FACT CHECK: Hillary Clinton’s Speech To The Democratic Convention, Annotated

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton takes the stage on the final night of the Democratic National Convention.i

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton takes the stage on the final night of the Democratic National Convention.

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Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton takes the stage on the final night of the Democratic National Convention.

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton takes the stage on the final night of the Democratic National Convention.

Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Hillary Clinton accepted the Democratic nomination for president Thursday night, delivering a speech that lays out her plan to address terrorist threats and create jobs.

NPR’s politics team is annotating Clinton’s speech below — we will continue to update tonight. Portions commented on are highlighted, followed by analysis, context and fact check in italics.

(Editor’s note: You can read our fact check of Donald Trump’s speech at the Republican National Convention last week here.)

Thank you. Thank you so much. Thank you. Thank you all so so much. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you all very, very much. Thank you for that amazing welcome. Thank you all for the great convention that we’ve had.

And Chelsea, thank you.

I’m so proud to be your mother and so proud of the woman you’ve become.

Thank you for bringing Marc into our family, and Charlotte and Aidan into the world.

And Bill, that conversation we started in the law library 45 years ago, it is still going strong.

You know, that conversation has lasted through good times that filled us with joy, and hard times that tested us.

And I’ve even gotten a few words in along the way.

On Tuesday night, I was so happy to see that my Explainer-in-Chief is still on the job.

I’m also grateful to the rest of my family and to the friends of a lifetime.

For all of you whose hard work brought us here tonight, and to those of you who joined this campaign this week. Thank you.

What a remarkable week it’s been.

We heard the man from Hope, Bill Clinton.

[Bill Clinton grew up in Hope, Ark., and The Man From Hope is the title of a biographical film shown during the 1992 Democratic National Convention. — Danielle Kurtzleben]

And the man of Hope, Barack Obama.

America is stronger because of President Obama’s leadership, and I’m better because of his friendship.

We heard from our terrific vice president, the one and only Joe Biden. He spoke from his big heart about our party’s commitment to working people, as only he can do.

And First Lady Michelle Obama reminded us that our children are watching, and the president we elect is going to be their president, too.

And for those of you out there who are just getting to know Tim Kaine – you will soon understand why the people of Virginia keep promoting him: from city council and mayor, to Governor, and now Senator.

And he will make the whole country proud as our Vice President.

And…I want to thank Bernie Sanders.

Bernie, Bernie, your campaign inspired millions of Americans, particularly the young people who threw their hearts and souls into our primary.

You’ve put economic and social justice issues front and center, where they belong.

And to all of your supporters here and around the country: I want you to know, I’ve heard you. Your cause is our cause.

Our country needs your ideas, energy, and passion.

That is the only way we can turn our progressive platform into real change for America.

We wrote it together – now let’s go out and make it happen together.

My friends, we’ve come to Philadelphia – the birthplace of our nation – because what happened in this city 240 years ago still has something to teach us today.

We all know the story.

But we usually focus on how it turned out – and not enough on how close that story came to never being written at all.

When representatives from 13 unruly colonies met just down the road from here, some wanted to stick with the king. And some wanted to stick it to the king.

The revolution hung in the balance.

Then somehow, they began listening to each other, compromising, finding common purpose.

And by the time they left Philadelphia, they had begun to see themselves as one nation.

That’s what made it possible to stand up to a king.

That took courage. They had courage.

Our Founders embraced the enduring truth that we are stronger together.

Now, now America is once again at a moment of reckoning.

Powerful forces are threatening to pull us apart.

Bonds of trust and respect are fraying.

And just as with our founders, there are no guarantees.

It truly is up to us.

We have to decide whether we all will work together so we can all rise together.

Our country’s motto is “e pluribus unum:” out of many, we are one.

Will we stay true to that motto?

Well, we heard Donald Trump’s answer last week at his convention.

He wants to divide us from the rest of the world, and from each other.

He’s betting that the perils of today’s world will blind us to its unlimited promise.

He’s taken the Republican Party a long way from “Morning in America” to “Midnight in America.”

He wants us to fear the future and fear each other.

Well, you know, a great Democratic President, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, came up with the perfect rebuke to Trump more than eighty years ago, during a much more perilous time: “The only thing we have to fear is fear itself.”

Now we are clear-eyed about what our country is up against.

But we are not afraid.

We will rise to the challenge, just as we always have. We will not build a wall. Instead, we will build an economy where everyone who wants a good job can get one.

And we’ll build a path to citizenship for millions of immigrants who are already contributing to our economy!

We, we will not ban a religion. We will work with all Americans and our allies to fight and defeat terrorism.

There’s a lot of work to do.

Too many people haven’t had a pay raise since the crash.

There’s too much inequality.

Too little social mobility.

Too much paralysis in Washington.

Too many threats at home and abroad.

But just look for a minute at the strengths we bring as Americans to meet these challenges.

We have the most dynamic and diverse people in the world.

We have the most tolerant and generous young people we’ve ever had. We have the most powerful military. The most innovative entrepreneurs. The most enduring values: freedom and equality, justice and opportunity. We should be so proud that those words are associated with us.

I have to tell you, as your Secretary of State, I went to 112 countries, when people hear those words, they hear America.

So don’t let anyone tell you that our country is weak. We’re not.

Don’t let anyone tell you we don’t have what it takes. We do.

And most of all, don’t believe anyone who says, “I alone can fix it.”

Yes, those were actually Donald Trump’s words in Cleveland.

And they should set off alarm bells for all of us.

Really? I alone can fix it? Isn’t he forgetting?

Troops on the front lines. Police officers and firefighters who run toward danger. Doctors and nurses who care for us. Teachers who change lives. Entrepreneurs who see possibilities in every problem. Mothers who lost children to violence and are building a movement to keep other kids safe.

He’s forgetting every last one of us.

Americans don’t say, “I alone can fix it.”

We say, “We’ll fix it together.”

And remember, remember: Our Founders fought a revolution and wrote a Constitution so America would never be a nation where one person had all the power.

Two hundred and forty years later, we still put our faith in each other.

Look at what happened in Dallas after the assassinations of five brave police officers.

Police Chief David Brown asked the community to support his force, maybe even join them.

And you know how the community responded? Nearly 500 people applied in just 12 days.

[According to data posted on the Dallas Police Department Facebook page, 467 people applied to the department between July 8 and July 20. That’s more than triple the 136 people that applied between June 8 and June 20. — Danielle Kurtzleben]

That’s how Americans answer when the call for help goes out.

Twenty years ago, I wrote a book called “It Takes a Village.” And a lot of people looked at the title and asked, “What the heck do you mean by that?”

This is what I mean.

None of us can raise a family, build a business, heal a community or lift a country totally alone.

America needs every one of us to lend our energy, our talents, our ambition to making our nation better and stronger.

I believe that with all my heart.

That’s why “Stronger Together” is not just a lesson from our history. It’s not just a slogan for our campaign. It’s a guiding principle for the country we’ve always been and the future we’re going to build.

Now, sometimes, sometimes the people at this podium are new to the national stage.

As you know, I’m not one of those people.

I’ve been your First Lady, served eight years as a Senator from the great State of New York.

Then I represented all of you as Secretary of State.

But my job titles only tell you what I’ve done.

They don’t tell you why.

The truth is, through all these years of public service, the “service” part has always come easier to me than the “public” part.

I get it that some people just don’t know what to make of me.

So let me tell you.

The family I’m from, well, no one had their name on big buildings.

My family were builders of a different kind. Builders in the way most American families are.

They used whatever tools they had – whatever God gave them – and whatever life in America provided – and built better lives and better futures for their kids.

My grandfather worked in the same Scranton lace mill for 50 years.

Because he believed that if he gave everything he had, his children would have a better life than he did. And he was right.

My dad, Hugh, made it to college. He played football at Penn State and enlisted in the Navy after Pearl Harbor.

When the war was over, he started his own small business, printing fabric for draperies.

I remember watching him stand for hours over silk screens.

He wanted to give my brothers and me opportunities he never had.

And he did. My mother, Dorothy, was abandoned by her parents as a young girl. She ended up on her own at 14, working as a housemaid.

She was saved by the kindness of others.

Her first grade teacher saw she had nothing to eat at lunch and brought extra food to share the entire year.

The lesson she passed on to me, years later, stuck with me: No one gets through life alone.

We have to look out for each other and lift each other up.

And she made sure I learned the words from our Methodist faith: “Do all the good you can, for all the people you can, in all the ways you can, as long as ever you can.”

So, I went to work for the Children’s Defense Fund, going door-to-door in New Bedford, Massachusetts on behalf of children with disabilities who were denied the chance to go to school.

I remember meeting a young girl in a wheelchair on the small back porch of her house.

She told me how badly she wanted to go to school – it just didn’t seem possible in those days.

And I couldn’t stop thinking of my mother and what she’d gone through as a child.

It became clear to me that simply caring is not enough.

To drive real progress, you have to change both hearts and laws.

You need both understanding and action.

So we gathered facts. We built a coalition. And our work helped convince Congress to ensure access to education for all students with disabilities.

It’s a big idea, isn’t it?

Every kid with a disability has the right to go to school.

A country where the economy works for everyone, not just those at the top.

Where you can get a good job and send your kids to a good school, no matter what zip code you live in.

A country where all our children can dream, and those dreams are within reach.

Where families are strong, communities are safe, and yes, where love trumps hate.

That’s the country we’re fighting for.

That’s the future we’re working toward.

And so, my friends, it is with humility, determination and boundless confidence in
America’s promise that I accept your nomination for President of the United States!

Now, sometimes, sometimes the people at this podium are new to the national stage.

As you know, I’m not one of those people.

I’ve been your First Lady, served eight years as a Senator from the great State of New York.

Then I represented all of you as Secretary of State.

But my job titles only tell you what I’ve done.

They don’t tell you why.

The truth is, through all these years of public service, the “service” part has always come easier to me than the “public” part.

I get it that some people just don’t know what to make of me.

So let me tell you.

The family I’m from, well, no one had their name on big buildings.

My family were builders of a different kind.

Builders in the way most American families are.

They used whatever tools they had – whatever God gave them – and whatever life in America
provided – and built better lives and better futures for their kids.

My grandfather worked in the same Scranton lace mill for 50 years.

Because he believed that if he gave everything he had, his children would have a better life than he did.

And he was right.

My dad, Hugh, made it to college. He played football at Penn State and enlisted in the Navy after Pearl Harbor.

When the war was over, he started his own small business, printing fabric for draperies.

I remember watching him stand for hours over silk screens.

He wanted to give my brothers and me opportunities he never had.

And he did. My mother, Dorothy, was abandoned by her parents as a young girl. She
ended up on her own at 14, working as a housemaid.

She was saved by the kindness of others.

Her first grade teacher saw she had nothing to eat at lunch and brought extra food to share the entire year.

The lesson she passed on to me, years later, stuck with me: No one gets through life alone.

We have to look out for each other and lift each other up.

And she made sure I learned the words from our Methodist faith: “Do all the good you can, for all the people you can, in all the ways you can, as long as ever you can.”

So, I went to work for the Children’s Defense Fund, going door-to-door in New Bedford, Massachusetts on behalf of children with disabilities who were denied the chance to go to school.

I remember meeting a young girl in a wheelchair on the small back porch of her house.

She told me how badly she wanted to go to school – it just didn’t seem possible in those days.

And I couldn’t stop thinking of my mother and what she’d gone through as a child.

It became clear to me that simply caring is not enough.

To drive real progress, you have to change both hearts and laws.

You need both understanding and action.

So we gathered facts. We built a coalition. And our work helped convince Congress to ensure access to education for all students with disabilities.

It’s a big idea, isn’t it?

Every kid with a disability has the right to go to school.

I remember meeting a young girl in a wheelchair on the small back porch of her house.

She told me how badly she wanted to go to school – it just didn’t seem possible in those days.

And I couldn’t stop thinking of my mother and what she’d gone through as a child.

It became clear to me that simply caring is not enough.

To drive real progress, you have to change both hearts and laws.

You need both understanding and action.

So we gathered facts. We built a coalition. And our work helped convince Congress to ensure access to education for all students with disabilities.

It’s a big idea, isn’t it?

Every kid with a disability has the right to go to school.

But how, how do you make an idea like that real? You do it step-by-step, year-by-year, sometimes even door-by-door.

My heart just swelled when I saw Anastasia Somoza representing millions of young people on this stage – because we changed our law to make sure she got an education.

So it’s true. I sweat the details of policy – whether we’re talking about the exact level of lead in the drinking water in Flint, Michigan, the number of mental health facilities in Iowa, or the cost of your prescription drugs.

Because it’s not just a detail if it’s your kid – if it’s your family.

It’s a big deal. And it should be a big deal to your president, too.

After the four days of this convention, you’ve seen some of the people who’ve inspired me.

People who let me into their lives, and became a part of mine.

People like Ryan Moore and Lauren Manning.

They told their stories Tuesday night.

I first met Ryan as a seven-year old.

He was wearing a full body brace that must have weighed forty pounds, because I leaned over to lift him up.

Children like Ryan kept me going when our plan for universal health care failed and kept me working with leaders of both parties to help create the Children’s Health Insurance Program that covers 8 million kids in our country.

Lauren Manning, who stood here with such grace and power, was gravely injured on 9/11.

It was the thought of her, and Debbie St. John who you saw in the movie, and John Dolan and Joe Sweeney, and all the victims and survivors, that kept me working as hard as I could in the Senate on behalf of 9/11 families, and our first responders who got sick from their time at Ground Zero.

I was thinking of Lauren, Debbie and all the others ten years later in the White House Situation Room when President Obama made the courageous decision that finally brought Osama bin Laden to justice.

And in this campaign, I’ve met many more people who motivate me to keep fighting for change.

And, with your help, I will carry all of your voices and stories with me to the White House.

And you heard, you heard from, from Republicans and Independents who are supporting our campaign. Well, I will be a President for Democrats, Republicans, and Independents, for the struggling, the striving the successful, for all those who vote for me and for those who don’t. For all Americans together.

Tonight, tonight we’ve reached a milestone in our nation’s march toward a more perfect union: the first time that a major party has nominated a woman for President.

Standing here, standing here as my mother’s daughter, and my daughter’s mother, I’m so happy this day has come.

I’m happy for grandmothers and little girls and everyone in between.

I’m happy for boys and men, too – because when any barrier falls in America, it clears the way for everyone. After all, when there are no ceilings, the sky’s the limit.

So let’s keep going, let’s keep going until every one of the 161 million women and girls across America has the opportunity she deserves to have.

But even more important than the history we make tonight, is the history we will write together in the years ahead.

Let’s begin with what we’re going to do to help working people in our country get ahead and stay ahead.

Now, I don’t think President Obama and Vice President Biden get the credit they deserve for saving us from the worst economic crisis of our lifetimes.

Our economy is so much stronger than when they took office. Nearly 15 million new private-sector jobs. Twenty million more Americans with health insurance. And an auto industry that just had its best year ever.

[The jobs-gain figure Clinton cites is from the trough, which came about a year after President Obama took office. The insurance figure includes those who gained coverage through new insurance exchanges, expansion of Medicaid, and changes in the private insurance market that allow young adults to stay on their parents’ plan. U.S. auto sales hit 17.5 million last year, an all-time high. — Scott Horsley]

Now that’s real progress, but none of us can be satisfied with the status quo. Not by a long shot.

We’re still facing deep-seated problems that developed long before the recession and have stayed with us through the recovery.

I’ve gone around our country talking to working families. And I’ve heard from many who feel like the economy sure isn’t working for them.

Some of you are frustrated – even furious.

And you know what? You’re right.

It’s not yet working the way it should.

Americans are willing to work – and work hard.

But right now, an awful lot of people feel there is less and less respect for the work they do.

And less respect for them, period.

Democrats, we are the party of working people.

But we haven’t done a good enough job showing we get what you’re going through, and we’re going to do something to help.

So tonight I want to tell you tonight how we will empower Americans to live better lives.

My primary mission as President will be to create more opportunity and more good jobs with rising wages right here in the United States.

From my first day in office to my last, especially in places that for too long have been left out and left behind.

From our inner cities to our small towns, from Indian Country to Coal Country.

From communities ravaged by addiction to regions hollowed out by plant closures.

And here’s what I believe.

I believe America thrives when the middle class thrives.

I believe that our economy isn’t working the way it should because our democracy isn’t working the way it should.

Now that’s real progress, but none of us can be satisfied with the status quo. Not by a long shot.

We’re still facing deep-seated problems that developed long before the recession and have stayed with us through the recovery.

I’ve gone around our country talking to working families. And I’ve heard from many who feel like the economy sure isn’t working for them.

Some of you are frustrated – even furious.

And you know what? You’re right.

It’s not yet working the way it should.

Americans are willing to work – and work hard.

But right now, an awful lot of people feel there is less and less respect for the work they do.

And less respect for them, period.

Democrats, we are the party of working people.

But we haven’t done a good enough job showing we get what you’re going through,

and we’re going to do something to help.

So tonight I want to tell you tonight how we will empower Americans to live better lives.

My primary mission as President will be to create more opportunity and more good jobs with rising wages right here in the United States.

From my first day in office to my last, especially in places that for too long have been left out and left behind.

From our inner cities to our small towns, from Indian Country to Coal Country.

From communities ravaged by addiction to regions hollowed out by plant closures.

And here’s what I believe.

I believe America thrives when the middle class thrives.

I believe that our economy isn’t working the way it should because our democracy isn’t working the way it should.

That’s why we need to appoint Supreme Court justices who will get money out of politics and expand voting rights, not restrict them.

[With this oversimplified phrase, Clinton is effectively calling for court-mandated public financing, which is extremely unlikely. — Peter Overby]

And if necessary, we will pass a constitutional amendment to overturn Citizens United.

[Passing a constitutional amendment would very likely be really, really, really hard in the current political climate of gridlock. Proposing one requires either a two-thirds vote of the House and Senate or a constitutional convention, which two-thirds of the states would have to call for, according to the National Archives. To be ratified, it requires 38 of the 50 states to approve it. — Danielle Kurtzleben]

[And not even advocates of this one can agree on language that avoids other First Amendment issues. — Peter Overby]

I believe American corporations that have gotten so much from our country should be just as patriotic in return.

Many of them are. But too many aren’t.

It’s wrong to take tax breaks with one hand and give out pink slips with the other.

And I believe Wall Street can never, ever be allowed to wreck Main Street again.

And I believe in science. I believe climate change is real and that we can save our planet while creating millions of good-paying clean energy jobs.

I believe that when we have millions of hardworking immigrants contributing to our economy, it would be self-defeating and inhumane to try to kick them out.

Comprehensive immigration reform will grow our economy and keep families together – and it’s the right thing to do.

[The Congressional Budget Office projected the immigration bill passed by the Senate in 2013 would boost the economy and reduce the federal deficit, while slightly reducing wages. — Scott Horsley]

So, whatever party you belong to, or if you belong to no party at all, if you share these beliefs, this is your campaign.

If you believe that companies should share profits with their workers, not pad executive bonuses, join us.

If you believe the minimum wage should be a living wage, and no one working full time should have to raise their children in poverty, join us.

If you believe that every man, woman and child in America has the right to affordable health care, join us.

If you believe that we should say “no” to unfair trade deals, that we should stand up to China, that we should support our steelworkers and autoworkers and homegrown manufacturers, then join us.

If you believe we should expand Social Security and protect a woman’s right to make her own healthcare decisions, then join us.

And yes, yes if you believe that your working mother, wife, sister, or daughter deserves equal pay, join us.

That’s how we’re going to sure this economy works for everyone, not just those at the top.

Now, you didn’t hear any of this, did you, from Donald Trump at his convention.

He spoke for 70-odd minutes – and I do mean odd.

And he offered zero solutions. But we already know he doesn’t believe these things.

No wonder he doesn’t like talking about his plans.

You might have noticed, I love talking about mine.

In my first hundred days, we will work with both parties to pass the biggest investment in new, good-paying jobs since World War II.

Jobs in manufacturing, clean energy, technology and innovation, small business, and infrastructure.

If we invest in infrastructure now, we’ll not only create jobs today, but lay the foundation for the jobs of the future.

And we will also transform the way we prepare our young people for those jobs.

Bernie Sanders and I will work together to make college tuition-free for the middle class and debt-free for all!

We will also, we will also liberate millions of people who already have student debt.

It’s just not right that Donald Trump can ignore his debts, and students and families can’t refinance their debts.

And something we don’t say often enough: Sure, college is crucial, but a four-year degree should not be the only path to a good job.

[The income gap between high school and college grads is bigger for millennials than it was for Generation Xers, baby boomers and the Silent Generation, according to a 2014 Pew Research Center report. — Danielle Kurtzleben]

We will help more people learn a skill or practice a trade and make a good living doing it.

We will give small businesses like my dad’s a boost. Make it easier to get credit. Way too many dreams die in the parking lots of banks.

In America, if you can dream it, you should be able to build it.

And we will help you balance family and work. And you know what, if fighting for affordable childcare and paid family leave is playing the “woman card,” then deal me in.

Now, here’s the other thing, we’re not only going to make all these investments, we’re going to pay for every single one of them.

And here’s how: Wall Street, corporations, and the super-rich are going to start paying their fair share of taxes.

This is not because we resent success, because when more than 90 percent of the gains have gone to the top 1 percent, that’s where the money is, and we are going to follow the money.

And if companies take tax breaks and then ship jobs overseas, we’ll make them pay us back. And we’ll put that money to work where it belongs, creating jobs here at home!

Now, now I imagine some of you are sitting at home thinking, well that all sounds pretty good.

But how are you going to get it done? How are you going to break through the gridlock in Washington? Well, look at my record. I’ve worked across the aisle to pass laws and treaties and to launch new programs that help millions of people. And if you give me the chance, that’s ex what I’ll do as President.

But then I also imagine people are thinking out there, but Trump, he’s a businessman. He must know something about the economy.

Well, let’s take a closer look.

In Atlantic City, 60 miles from here, you will find contractors and small businesses who lost everything because Donald Trump refused to pay his bills.

Now, remember what the president said last night: “Don’t boo, vote.” People who did the work and needed the money, and didn’t get it – not because he couldn’t pay them, but because he wouldn’t pay them. He just stiffed them.

[True. Specifically, she is referring to the losses suffered by contractors on the Taj Mahal casino. The Associated Press found that Trump owed $70 million to 253 contractors when the casino opened. After the casino filed for bankruptcy about a year later, many contractors got just 33 percent of what they were owed. As a result some went out of business.

[It’s unclear whether Trump could have paid those bills, as Clinton argued. He was deeply overleveraged on the project, with extensive debt, and both his corporate and personal finances were in relatively poor shape at the time. — Matt Katz, WNYC]

And you know that sales pitch he’s making to be president? Put your faith in him – and you’ll win big? That’s the same sales pitch he made to all those small businesses. Then Trump walked away, and left working people holding the bag.

He also talks a big game about putting America First. Well please explain what part of America First leads him to make Trump ties in China, not Colorado. Trump suits in Mexico, not Michigan. Trump furniture in Turkey, not Ohio. Trump picture frames in India, not Wisconsin.

Donald Trump says he wants to make America great again – well, he could start by actually making things in America again.

Now, the choice we face in this election is just as stark when it comes to our national security.

You know, anyone, anyone reading the news can see the threats and turbulence we face.

From Baghdad to Kabul, to Nice and Paris and Brussels, from San Bernardino to Orlando, we’re dealing with determined enemies that must be defeated.

So, it’s no wonder that people are anxious and looking for reassurance. Looking for steady leadership, wanting a leader who understands we are stronger when we work with our allies around the world and care for our veterans here at home. Keeping our nation safe and honoring the people who do that work will be my highest priority.

I’m proud that we put a lid on Iran’s nuclear program without firing a single shot – now we have to enforce it, and we must keep supporting Israel’s security.

[Experts believe the agreement has lengthened the time Iran would need to develop a nuclear bomb from weeks or months to at least a year. However, the deal has had little effect on Iran’s nonnuclear troublemaking elsewhere in the region. — Scott Horsley]

I’m proud that we shaped a global climate agreement – now we have to hold every country accountable to their commitments, including ourselves.

And I’m proud to stand by our allies in NATO against any threat they face, including from Russia.

I’ve laid out my strategy for defeating ISIS. We will strike their sanctuaries from the air, and support local forces taking them out on the ground. We will surge our intelligence so that we detect and prevent attacks before they happen.

We will disrupt their efforts online to reach and radicalize young people in our country.

It won’t be easy or quick, but make no mistake – we will prevail.

Now Donald Trump, Donald Trump says, and this is a quote, “I know more about ISIS than the generals do.” No, Donald, you don’t.

He thinks, he thinks that he knows more than our military because he claimed our armed forces are “a disaster.”

Well, I’ve had the privilege to work closely with our troops and our veterans for many years, including as a senator on the Armed Services Committee and I know how wrong he is. Our military is a national treasure.

We entrust our commander-in-chief to make the hardest decisions our nation faces, decisions about war and peace, life and death.

A president should respect the men and women who risk their lives to serve our country – including Captain Khan and the sons of Tim Kaine and Mike Pence, both Marines.

So just ask yourself: Do you really think Donald Trump has the temperament to be Commander-in-Chief?

Donald Trump can’t even handle the rough-and-tumble of a presidential campaign.

He loses his cool at the slightest provocation. When he’s gotten a tough question from a reporter. When he’s challenged in a debate. When he sees a protestor at a rally.

Imagine, if you dare, imagine, imagine him in the Oval Office facing a real crisis. A man you can bait with a tweet is not a man we can trust with nuclear weapons.

I can’t put it, I can’t put it any better than Jackie Kennedy did after the Cuban Missile Crisis. She said that what worried President Kennedy during that very dangerous time was that a war might be started – not by big men with self-control and restraint, but by little men – the ones moved by fear and pride.

America’s strength doesn’t come from lashing out. It relies on smarts, judgment, cool resolve, and the precise and strategic application of power. And that’s the kind of Commander-in-Chief I pledge to be.

And if we’re serious about keeping our country safe, we also can’t afford to have a President who’s in the pocket of the gun lobby.

I’m not here to repeal the second Amendment. I’m not here to take away your guns.

I just don’t want you to be shot by someone who shouldn’t have a gun in the first place.

We will work tirelessly with responsible gun owners to pass common-sense reforms and keep guns out of the hands of criminals, terrorists and all others who would do us harm.

You know, for decades, people have said this issue was too hard to solve and the politics too hot to touch.

But I ask you: how can we just stand by and do nothing?

You heard, you saw, family members of people killed by gun violence on this stage.

You heard, you saw, family members of police officers killed in the line of duty because they were outgunned by criminals.

I refuse to believe we can’t find common ground here.

We have to heal the divides in our country.

Not just on guns. But on race. Immigration. And more.

And that starts with listening, listening to each other. Trying, as best we can, to walk in each other’s shoes.

So let’s put ourselves in the shoes of young black and Latino men and women who face the effects of systemic racism, and are made to feel like their lives are disposable.

Let’s put ourselves in the shoes of police officers, kissing their kids and spouses goodbye every day, heading off to do a dangerous and necessary job.

We will reform our criminal justice system from end-to-end and rebuild trust between law enforcement and the communities they serve.

And we will defend, we will defend all our rights – civil rights, human rights and voting rights, women’s rights and workers’ rights, LGBT rights and the rights of people with disabilities!

And we will stand up against mean and divisive rhetoric wherever it comes from.

You know, for the past year, many people made the mistake of laughing off Donald Trump’s comments – excusing him as an entertainer just putting on a show.

They thought he couldn’t possibly mean all the horrible things he says – like when he called women “pigs.” Or said that an American judge couldn’t be fair because of his Mexican heritage.

Or when he mocks and mimics a reporter with a disability.

Or insults prisoners of war like John McCain –a true hero and patriot who deserves our respect.

Now at first, at first, I admit, I couldn’t believe he meant it either.

It was just too hard to fathom – that someone who wants to lead our nation could say those things. Could be like that.

But here’s the sad truth: There is no other Donald Trump. This is it.

And in the end, it comes down to what Donald Trump doesn’t get: that America is great – because America is good.

So enough with the bigotry and bombast. Donald Trump’s not offering real change.

He’s offering empty promises. And what are we offering? A bold agenda to improve the lives of people across our country – to keep you safe, to get you good jobs, and to give your kids the opportunities they deserve.

The choice is clear, my friends.

Every generation of Americans has come together to make our country freer, fairer, and stronger.

None of us ever have or can do it alone.

I know that at a time when so much seems to be pulling us apart, it can be hard to imagine how we’ll ever pull together.

But I’m here to tell you tonight – progress is possible.

I know, I know because I’ve seen it in the lives of people across America who get knocked down and get right back up.

And I know it, I know it from my own life. More than a few times, I’ve had to pick myself up and get back in the game.

Like so much else in my life, I got this from my mother too. She never let me back down from any challenge. When I tried to hide from a neighborhood bully, she literally blocked the door. “Go back out there,” she said.

And she was right. You have to stand up to bullies.

You have to keep working to make things better, even when the odds are long and the opposition is fierce.

We lost our mother a few years ago, but I miss her every day. And I still hear her voice urging me to keep working, keep fighting for right, no matter what.

That’s what we need to do together as a nation.

Though “we may not live to see the glory,” as the song from the musical Hamilton goes, “let us gladly join the fight.”

Let our legacy be about “planting seeds in a garden you never get to see.”

That’s why we’re here…not just in this hall, but on this Earth.

The Founders showed us that.

And so have many others since.

They were drawn together by love of country, and the selfless passion to build something better for all who follow.

That is the story of America. And we begin a new chapter tonight.

Yes, the world is watching what we do.

Yes, America’s destiny is ours to choose.

So let’s be stronger together, my fellow Americans.

Let’s look to the future with courage and confidence.

Let’s build a better tomorrow for our beloved children and our beloved country.

And when we do, America will be greater than ever.

Thank you and may God bless you and the United States of America!

Writer James Alan McPherson, Winner Of Pulitzer, MacArthur And Guggenheim, Dies At 72

Jul 28, 2016   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Writer James Alan McPherson, Winner Of Pulitzer, MacArthur And Guggenheim, Dies At 72

American author James Alan McPherson, photographed in 1984.i

American author James Alan McPherson, photographed in 1984.

Anthony Barboza/Getty Images


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Anthony Barboza/Getty Images

American author James Alan McPherson, photographed in 1984.

American author James Alan McPherson, photographed in 1984.

Anthony Barboza/Getty Images

As a teenager, James Alan McPherson worked as a passenger-car waiter on the Great Northern Railroad. The experience shaped him as a man and as a writer; he would spend his life producing short fiction and essays exploring race and class in America — the gulf separating white privilege from the black experience. One of his first published stories, “On Trains,” included in his fiction collection Hue and Cry, chronicles a white woman’s unthinking treatment of black waiters and porters on a train, and subtly reveals its lingering effects on all involved.

He put himself through Harvard Law School working as a janitor; the month he graduated he sold his first manuscript to the Atlantic Monthly magazine. In 1972, he was awarded a John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship. In 1978, he became the first African-American writer to win a Pulitzer Prize for fiction, for his collection Elbow Room.

That same year, he talked to The Atlantic about his approach to writing, to race, and to life: “I believe that if one can experience diversity, touch a variety of its people, laugh at its craziness, distill wisdom from its tragedies, and attempt to synthesize all this inside oneself without going crazy, one will have earned the right to call oneself ‘citizen of the United States.'”

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In 1981 he was named a MacArthur Fellow, and in 1995 he was inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Later in life, he spent many years as a professor at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop in Iowa City.

I studied under him there in 1994 and 1995. He was a kind and very gentle man, soft-spoken to the point of shyness, but as a teacher he could be quite firm, unafraid to point out a young writer’s blind spots.

He believed that to write fiction in America meant writing about class in America, and that young writers must remain mindful of that fact, lest their work come off as callow and shamefully ignorant.

Many times I watched him press a student in his workshop (on more than one occasion, me) about the racial and cultural underpinnings of his or her story: what did it mean that I set this scene at a swanky restaurant? How could my characters afford it? What were they prioritizing in their lives to make that choice over others? And if they truly didn’t have to worry about money, how would that affect the way they moved through the world? Did they believe themselves entitled to the life they lived? Did they even notice the waiters and busboys swirling around them?

American history was a passion of his, and though his work often evinced a wry humor, in person he struck me as a serious man who cared deeply about the shadow that history casts on the present. I remember him walking into workshop the weekend after the film Forrest Gump came out, and spending fifteen minutes quietly but passionately fuming over its glib, whistle-stop debasement of the American experience.

He wasn’t a the kind of teacher who offered his students close line-edits; instead, he was someone who read your work and reflected it back to you, patiently explained just what you had really written — and what you had not. And if you were a writer like I was then, you couldn’t help but come away from a workshop with Jim believing that what you hadn’t written was the stuff that was really worth writing about.

James Alan McPherson died today in an Iowa City hospital of respiratory failure and other complications. He was 72.

Petra Mayer contributed to this report.

David Bald Eagle, Lakota Chief, Musician, Cowboy And Actor, Dies At 97

Jul 28, 2016   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on David Bald Eagle, Lakota Chief, Musician, Cowboy And Actor, Dies At 97

Chief David Beautiful Bald Eagle during the opening of the Days of '74 Museum in Deadwood, S.D. Bald Eagle died on Friday at the age of 97.i

Chief David Beautiful Bald Eagle during the opening of the Days of ’74 Museum in Deadwood, S.D. Bald Eagle died on Friday at the age of 97.

Tom Griffith/Rapid City Journal via AP


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Chief David Beautiful Bald Eagle during the opening of the Days of '74 Museum in Deadwood, S.D. Bald Eagle died on Friday at the age of 97.

Chief David Beautiful Bald Eagle during the opening of the Days of ’74 Museum in Deadwood, S.D. Bald Eagle died on Friday at the age of 97.

Tom Griffith/Rapid City Journal via AP

In the U.K., the headlines note the passing of a “Dances With Wolves actor.”

But appearing in an Oscar-award-winning film was one of the least interesting things David Bald Eagle ever did.

Bald Eagle died last Friday at 97. In his long, extraordinary life, he was a champion dancer — both ballroom and Lakota styles — a touring musician, a rodeo cowboy, a tribal chief, an actor, a stunt double, a war hero.

He danced with Marilyn Monroe. He drove race cars. He parachuted into the front lines at Normandy. He played professional baseball. He was a leader not just of his tribe, but of the United Native Nations. He was an advocate for Native people.

And he was a bridge between the past and present — a man who, in his childhood, heard stories from survivors of the Battle of Little Bighorn.

Bald Eagle — whose full Lakota name translates to Wounded in Winter Beautiful Bald Eagle, the BBC reports — was born in 1919. At the time, he couldn’t be a U.S. citizen. He was 5 when America finally extended citizenship to indigenous people.

He lived with his grandfather White Feather as a child, the Rapid City Journal has written. His other grandfather was Chief White Bull, a relative of Sitting Bull and one of the leaders in the Battle of Little Bighorn. Both would tell young David their war stories, and exhort him to remember them.

Bald Eagle only spoke Lakota until he was 12, when he started school. He spent his teenage years learning English, playing sports — everything from pole vault to baseball — and competing in the rodeo.

As a young man Bald Eagle enlisted in the horse cavalry. A few years later it was mechanized: The Army swapped his horse for a motorcycle, and made him a messenger.

He was discharged on Dec. 7, 1941. After he’d signed his papers, he heard the news about Pearl Harbor. At his commander’s request he reenlisted, joining as a paratrooper with the 82nd Airborne.

Sgt. Bald Eagle’s first combat jump was during the invasion of Anzio, Italy. He was part of a regiment that fought so fiercely a captured German soldier called them “Devils in Baggy Pants.”

Then he parachuted into Normandy, suffering severe injuries when he was accidentally dropped directly over the German lines, an easy target for gunfire.

“We were just like clay pigeons, coming down. Most of my outfit was wiped out,” he told the Rapid City Journal in 2001.

“The first medics to reach him left him for dead,” the paper wrote. “But some British commandos came along and found he still had a pulse.”

Bald Eagle survived. He started a musical career, as a drummer for Cliff Keyes’ Big Band, the BBC reports.

While he was in the Army, he’d met and fallen in love with an English dance teacher named Penny Rathburn. After he returned from the war, they were married.

As a couple, they were competitive ballroom dancerschampion ballroom dancers, in fact, dancing in St. Paul and Chicago.

Penny was pregnant with their first child when she died in a car crash. Bald Eagle was devastated.

“I became pretty much suicidal from then on,” he once said in an interview. “Why her, not me?”

So he took up dangerous pursuits.

He started race car driving, tried skydiving, returned to the rodeo circuit, took up bareback bull riding, became a stunt double in the movies.

But when chasing death, he came across success. His work as a stunt double “made his name,” according to Richard Bullock, who has written an obituary of Bald Eagle.

Shooting Westerns required “people who can actually ride horses,” as Sonny Skyhawk puts it. Skyhawk is a member of the Sicangu Lakota Nation who has been a film actor for nearly four decades.

So Bald Eagle, a talented rider, went on to appear in dozens of Hollywood films — which is how he met, and danced with, Marilyn Monroe.

The Westerns he was in represented Native people as less than human, Skyhawk says: “We were always being shot down or killed. With one bullet five or more Indians would fall.”

But Bald Eagle always tried to teach people about Native American history and life, whatever was happening around him, Skyhawk says.

“He excelled at being an educator, and did whatever it took, whatever his own power and talents, to bring that to the forefront,” Skyhawk says.

During the post-war years, he played professional baseball in Minnesota. He returned to dancing — Indian Dancing, this time, Bullock says.

Dave Bald Eagle, at 95, playing the role of Dan in Neither Wolf Nor Dog.i

Dave Bald Eagle, at 95, playing the role of Dan in Neither Wolf Nor Dog.

Courtesy of Steven Lewis Simpson


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Courtesy of Steven Lewis Simpson

Dave Bald Eagle, at 95, playing the role of Dan in Neither Wolf Nor Dog.

Dave Bald Eagle, at 95, playing the role of Dan in Neither Wolf Nor Dog.

Courtesy of Steven Lewis Simpson

And he toured with Casey Tibbs’ Wild West Show as a rodeo performer, under the name “Chips Warner,” because crowds didn’t like Indian names.

It was with Tibbs in Europe, at the World’s Fair in Brussels in 1958, that he met the second love of his life: Josee Kesteman, a young Belgian actress.

“When she came into my life, my life changed again,” Bald Eagle told the Rapid City Journal. “She was the one who kept me alive.”

Their courtship spanned years and thousands of miles. And as described in a profile of one of the couple’s sons, it featured a movie-worthy parting line:

“Before he left Belgium … David told Josee that he had a cave in South Dakota waiting for her if she ever wanted to come live with him.

“All Josee could think about was that cave in South Dakota … she decided to leave Brussels behind in 1972.”

The cave comment was a joke, Bald Eagle later explained, but Josee seemed totally game for the plan. The two married the next year, and instead of a cave, they lived on a horse ranch on the Cheyenne River Reservation.

They raised a large family together, one that grew even larger when they adopted many children, Skyhawk says. Several of their children have served in the military, including two who served in the 82nd Airborne, like their father.

After settling down, Bald Eagle became the chief of the Miniconjou Lakota. Then he became First Chief of the United Native Nations, an organization representing a number of tribes.

Chief Bald Eagle had extraordinary exploits and adventures, but Skyhawk says his greatest attribute was something quieter: his “silent compassion.”

“He loved children, he loved teaching, he loved educating people — he loved it all. He loved life to its extreme,” Skyhawk says. “No matter who you were, child, man, woman, he made you feel special. And that is a huge, huge mark on the telling of who you are as a human being, and he exemplified that.”

Bald Eagle continuously advocated for indigenous people and worked to preserve Lakota stories.

“I know we can’t go back there, back to where we were,” he told the Rapid City Journal in 2003. But we can tell the young ones how it was and they can remember, and they can bring it back. They can return.”

He kept acting, too. There was that appearance in Dances with Wolves, after all. For decades, The Associated Press writes, Bald Eagle was the face of the Lakota in tourism ads for South Dakota.

And at the age of 95, he had his first lead role, after all those years as a stunt double: He starred in the independent film Neither Wolf Nor Dog.

He threw his heart into the role, director Steven Lewis Simpson said. At a key point in the plot, he improvised — speaking off the cuff about the massacre at Wounded Knee and how it affected his people.

“At that point he’s not acting — he is just literally a great Lakota elder sharing with us the historical trauma of his people,” Simpson says.

“He was an extraordinary human being,” Simpson says, pointing to Bald Eagle’s mischievous humor and his fearlessness. “His biography is filled with things that would have killed lesser men.”

He says Bald Eagle would reminisce about his days with Casey Tibbs and his time on the rodeo circuit, but that he was most proud of his family with Josee. They’d host huge family gatherings at their ranch, Simpson says, and even in his late 90s, David Beautiful Bald Eagle was every bit the active head of the family.

“The funny thing is that normally when a 97-year-old passes you go, ‘Well, they had an incredible long life.’ You kind of think it’s the end of it. And yet in a strange way with Dave … You just didn’t feel there was an end to him.”

Skyhawk, too, says it’s hard to believe that Bald Eagle is gone — and nearly impossible to find the words to describe him.

“He was a short man in stature but he was immeasurable in what he has done for his fellow man and for his native people,” Skyhawk says.

“If I had to describe, him I’d say tatanka, which is the Lakota word for buffalo. And the male buffalo in the course of a storm, a blizzard, will stand there and face it head-on. He won’t lie down and he won’t hide behind anything. That’s what this man did: he faced everything with integrity and everything that he had in his own heart.

“And it would have taken a big heart.”

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