Browsing articles from "October, 2014"

Lava Flow In Hawaii Spares Homes, But Threatens To Cut Off Community

Oct 31, 2014   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on Lava Flow In Hawaii Spares Homes, But Threatens To Cut Off Community

Lava near the leading edge of the flow oozing over a concrete slab and towards a tangerine tree before solidifying near the town of Pahoa on the Big Island of Hawaii earlier this week.i
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Lava near the leading edge of the flow oozing over a concrete slab and towards a tangerine tree before solidifying near the town of Pahoa on the Big Island of Hawaii earlier this week.

U.S. Geological Survey/AP


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Lava near the leading edge of the flow oozing over a concrete slab and towards a tangerine tree before solidifying near the town of Pahoa on the Big Island of Hawaii earlier this week.

Lava near the leading edge of the flow oozing over a concrete slab and towards a tangerine tree before solidifying near the town of Pahoa on the Big Island of Hawaii earlier this week.

U.S. Geological Survey/AP

Officials in Hawaii are sending National Guard troops to the town of Pahoa on the Big Island, where a lava flow is creeping toward a main road, threatening to cut off the community.

Hawaii County Civil Defense Director Darryl Oliveira said 83 troops have been sent to the town of fewer than 1,000 to help provide security. They are to aid in a road block and with other safety issues, The Associated Press says.

“These are local troops, people from the community. They’ll be here working to take care of their family and friends,” Oliveira said.

As we reported earlier, dozens of residents had prepared to watch their homes destroyed by the lava, but so far only one shed has been destroyed by the scorching flow.

Even so, “Pahoa residents say the lava will reshape the community yard by yard as it creeps toward the ocean,” the AP writes.

KHON writes: “Residents down wind that may be sensitive or have respiratory problems are advised to take necessary precautions and to remain indoors. Additional health advisories may be issued depending upon materials involved with any fires associated with the lava flow.”

The news agency says:

“The front of the flow was ‘sluggish’ Thursday, Oliveira said, moving less than 5 yards per hour.

“The languid pace has given residents time to pack their valuables and get out of the way. But it’s been agonizing for those wondering whether the lava might change directions and head for them, and stressful for those trying to figure out how they will cope once the lava blocks the town’s only roads.”

Pop Culture Happy Hour: ‘Dear White People’ And The State Of Animation

Oct 31, 2014   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on Pop Culture Happy Hour: ‘Dear White People’ And The State Of Animation

A drawing of two clinking martini glasses.

With Linda Holmes on vacation during this week’s taping, we turn to a pair of dear familiar faces in Code Switch‘s Gene Demby and Kat Chow. As race and culture bloggers for NPR, they’ve got a few opinions about our first topic this week: the film Dear White People, which satirizes black campus life at a fictional Ivy League university. Our panel (Gene, Kat, Glen Weldon and myself) is decidedly mixed on the film, appreciating some characters more than others and holding misgivings about the film’s point of view and motley bundle of supporting players.

Then it’s on to a wide-ranging discussion of modern TV animation, which we agree has never been better as a whole. We refer back to a recent discussion about the demise of Saturday-morning cartoons while reflecting on realism vs. absurdism, the range of voice-acting and animation quality, and the chasm between big-budget computer animation and the more playfully crude likes of South Park. Along the way, we touch on Bob’s Burgers, The Simpsons, Adventure Time, Archer, The Legend Of Korra, Batman: The Animated Series, Sagwa, the works of Filmation and much more.

Finally, we close with What’s Making Us Happy this week. Kat expounds on her obsession with momofuku cakes and horse shirts, while Gene, like so many people, is in love with this podcast from the makers of This American Life. Glen offers a mea culpa over a misstatement about Prince’s “Purple Rain” last week, before launching into a mixed defense of this song and a full-throated endorsement of this TV show. And I praise yet another new David Rees project: an unlikely mashup of two musicians you’d never expect to hear together.

Find us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter: me, Glen, Kat, Gene, absent Linda, producer Jessica, and our pal Mike.

Is It Too Early To Call Madison Bumgarner A Legend?

Oct 31, 2014   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Is It Too Early To Call Madison Bumgarner A Legend?

Madison Bumgarner of the San Francisco Giants celebrates after defeating the Kansas City Royals to win game seven of the 2014 World Series.i
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Madison Bumgarner of the San Francisco Giants celebrates after defeating the Kansas City Royals to win game seven of the 2014 World Series.

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Madison Bumgarner of the San Francisco Giants celebrates after defeating the Kansas City Royals to win game seven of the 2014 World Series.

Madison Bumgarner of the San Francisco Giants celebrates after defeating the Kansas City Royals to win game seven of the 2014 World Series.

Elsa/Getty Images

By the looks of the Internet today, no — it’s not too early at all. Last night, the San Francisco Giants pitcher delivered a performance that many are calling legendary, as the Giants beat the Kansas City Royals in Game 7 of the World Series. Even NPR’s Tom Goldman said Bumgarner’s performance was “one of the greatest ever.” And the guy’s only 25; he might not have even reached his prime yet.

Head over to the MLB homepage and you’ll see the words, “The World’s greatest?” followed by Bumgarner’s nickname, MadBum.

Here’s the New York Times’ take:

There’s justification to this hype. Bumgarner’s 0.43 earned runs average for the Series is outrageously low. The only run he gave up was a meaningless solo homer in Game 1, when the Giants were already up by seven. Then, after tossing 117 pitches in a complete game shutout of the Royals on Sunday night, he only took two days off before delivering a masterful five innings as a reliever last night to secure the win for the Giants.

Twitter was alive with colorful commentary on just how much adoration Fox announcer Joe Buck showered upon the pitcher during the entire series.

Many commentators have compared Bumgarner’s performance to that of Randy Johnson, who pitched for the Arizona Diamondbacks against the New York Yankees in the 2001 World Series. Johnson got two wins, and then came in for a crucial inning of relief in Game 7 after having just pitched seven innings the night before.

Sports Illustrated called Bumgarner “scintillating.” Michael Rosenberg said of the pitcher that “as much as any player in a generation, Bumgarner was the reason his team won the World Series.”

The San Fransisco Chronicle called him “the man who owns the World Series.” And then there was this nugget: “Like the gunslinger in a spaghetti Western, Bumgarner unstrapped his arm from its holster and the opposition faded away into the night.”

So, what’s next for the golden boy World Series MVP? Well, his contract isn’t up until 2017, so the Giants have a few more years to enjoy one really great, really young pitcher. But Sports Illustrated doesn’t think he’s the greatest just yet. They ranked his 21 innings only number five on a list of best World Series pitching performances.

Paolo Nutini On World Cafe

Oct 31, 2014   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Paolo Nutini On World Cafe

Paolo Nutini.i
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Paolo Nutini.

Shamil Tanna/Courtesy of the artist


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Paolo Nutini.

Paolo Nutini.

Shamil Tanna/Courtesy of the artist

Paolo Nutini's new album is called Caustic Love.

Paolo Nutini, the Scottish soul singer with the Italian name, is our guest today on World Cafe. Here, he and his band perform songs from his new album, Caustic Love, which has topped the charts across Europe.

In an interview with host David Dye, Nutini describes how a speech from Charlie Chaplin’s The Great Dictator resonated with him during the making of the song “Iron Sky.”

Angry Mob Sets Fire To Parliament In Burkina Faso

Oct 30, 2014   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on Angry Mob Sets Fire To Parliament In Burkina Faso

Demonstrators set fire to cars near Burkina Faso's Parliament on Thursday in Ouagadougou.i
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Demonstrators set fire to cars near Burkina Faso’s Parliament on Thursday in Ouagadougou.

Issouf Sanogo/AFP/Getty Images


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Demonstrators set fire to cars near Burkina Faso's Parliament on Thursday in Ouagadougou.

Demonstrators set fire to cars near Burkina Faso’s Parliament on Thursday in Ouagadougou.

Issouf Sanogo/AFP/Getty Images

Thousands of protesters in Burkina Faso broke through police lines and surged into the country’s parliament, setting the building on fire ahead of a vote that would have allowed the country’s president to extend his 27-year rule of the West African country.

The BBC reports that the ruling party headquarters and the city hall in the capital, Ouagadougou, were also in flames. State television reportedly went off the air.

“We did this because [President] Blaise Compaore was trying to stay too long. We are tired of him,” Seydou Kabre, a protester in the crowd heading for the prime minister’s office, told Reuters. “We want a change. He must go!”

Reuters quotes one local reporter as saying that a statement was read on state TV saying the controversial constitutional amendment had been withdrawn just before the station went silent. The news agency said that the information minister, reached by telephone, could not confirm the report.

Reuters says that security forces protecting the presidential palace had fired live rounds and tear gas to hold back crowds.

According to Reuters:

“Most deputies had not yet arrived for the vote when protesters, who had set up barricades outside parliament from early on Thursday, stormed the building. The crowd surged forward after police fired warning shots in the air.

“A Reuters reporter saw nearby structures also on fire and vehicles outside the parliament being smashed.”

The Associated Press notes: “Burkina Faso is typically known for relative stability and economic growth in a volatile region, but tensions have been rising” ahead of the vote on the constitutional amendment to let Compaore run again.

Top Stories: Secularists Win Tunisian Election; Burkina Faso Unrest

Oct 30, 2014   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on Top Stories: Secularists Win Tunisian Election; Burkina Faso Unrest

Good morning, here are our early stories:

— Tunisia’s Secularists Victorious In Parliamentary Vote.

— Angry Mob Sets Fire To Parliament In Burkina Faso.

— Madison Bumgarner Carries Giants To 3rd Title In 5 Years.

And here are more early headlines:

Sweden To Become First European Union Country To Recognize Palestine. (Time)

Israeli Police Kill Palestinian Suspect Who Wounded Israeli Activist. (Jerusalem Post)

Dozens Believed Killed By Sri Lanka Landslide. (Deutsche Welle)

Volcanic Lava Continues To Menace Hawaii Homes. (Honolulu Star-Advertiser)

NFL Expected To Seek Dismissal Of Painkiller Suit By Former Players. (AP)

Sistine Chapel Gets New Lighting, Air Conditioning Systems. (Telegraph)

New Species Of Frog Discovered – In New York City. (Smithsonian)

Dozens Of Countries Take In More Immigrants Per Capita Than The U.S.

Oct 30, 2014   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Dozens Of Countries Take In More Immigrants Per Capita Than The U.S.

U.S. Border Patrol agent Richard Funke looks for footprints from illegal immigrants crossing the U.S.- Mexico border on Dec. 7, 2010, near Nogales, Ariz.i
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U.S. Border Patrol agent Richard Funke looks for footprints from illegal immigrants crossing the U.S.- Mexico border on Dec. 7, 2010, near Nogales, Ariz.

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U.S. Border Patrol agent Richard Funke looks for footprints from illegal immigrants crossing the U.S.- Mexico border on Dec. 7, 2010, near Nogales, Ariz.

U.S. Border Patrol agent Richard Funke looks for footprints from illegal immigrants crossing the U.S.- Mexico border on Dec. 7, 2010, near Nogales, Ariz.

John Moore/Getty Images

If you think the United States is every immigrant’s dream, reconsider. Sure, in absolute numbers, the U.S. is home to the most foreign-born people — 45.7 million in 2013.

But relatively, it’s upper-mid-pack as an immigrant nation. It ranks 65th worldwide in terms of percentage of population that is foreign-born, according to the U.N. report “Trends in International Migrant Stock.”

Whether tax havens and worker-hungry Gulf states, refugee sanctuaries or diverse, thriving economies, a host of nations are more immigrant-dense than the famed American melting pot.

The Settler Nations

Immigrants make up more than a fourth (27.7 percent) of the land Down Under; two other settler nations, New Zealand and Canada, weigh in with 25.1 and 20.7 percent foreign-born, respectively. That’s compared to 14.3 percent in the United States.

Australia is no longer processing new visa applications from the three worst-hit countries in Africa's Ebola outbreak. Here, a jetliner prepares to land at Sydney's international airport.

A growing number of asylum seekers has motivated Australia to outsource its refugee uptake … to Cambodia.

While the U.K. remains Australia’s largest immigrant source, the nation’s Asian population has grown at a steady clip since the 1975 Racial Discrimination Act, which marked the end of the White Australia Policy (yes, it was that blatant). Migrants from India have almost tripled in the past decade, to 337,000, or 1.6 percent of the total population. Chinese and Vietnamese fare prominently in Australia’s makeup, too, with 1.8 and 0.9 percent, respectively.

Credit a sunny economic outlook. In August, 121,000 jobs were added, the most in three decades. But highly skilled workers are pretty easy to integrate; refugees, not so much. The growing number of asylum-seekers drawn to the country has motivated Australia to outsource its refugee uptake … to Cambodia. Arguably dangerous, immoral and probably illegal, the program is a clear indication that although Australia is made up heavily of immigrants, it’s no utopian melting pot.

Europe

Speaking of unrest, it’s no secret that immigration has recently fanned nationalistic — and often xenophobic — fervor throughout Europe. The big question for a country like Sweden is whether it can handle rapid growth of its immigrant population — immigrants now comprise 15.9 percent of the total population. As it stands, both Sweden and Ireland’s populations are composed, relatively, of more foreign-born than the United States.

A man passes by election posters demanding a stop to immigration, in Geneva on Monday.

An Armed Forces of Malta ship carrying rescued migrants arrives at an AFM base in Valletta last October. The number of migrants trying to make their way from the North African coast to European waters has ballooned in recent years.

Ireland has played host to a surge of Muslims from everywhere: from Arab countries to Balkan ones. They now constitute 1.1 percent of the population, up from 0.1 in 1991, and Islam could surpass Protestantism — at 5 percent of the population in 2011, the nation’s second-most popular religion, trailing Catholicism — by 2043.

Croatia and Estonia — which have an average GDP per capita of $14,295, a third of the United States’ — also have a larger piece of foreign-born population pie than the Americans. And plenty of European countries have larger net migration inflows than the United States: Portugal, Spain, Italy, Norway, the U.K. and all the aforementioned countries.

Tax Havens and Gulf States

Then there are the global rich’s favorite tax-saving second nations: Monaco (64.2 percent foreign-born), Andorra (56.9 percent), Luxembourg (43.3 percent) and Singapore (42.9 percent), among others.

For $250,000 you can claim St. Kitts and Nevis as home, and for $100,000 you’ve got yourself a passport from Dominica.

Migrants at a shelter in southern Mexico say that Mexico's interior checkpoints are making it harder to travel north. Some have given up on reaching the U.S. and are trying to stay in Mexico.

Another way to attract the world’s fat pocketbooks? Cash for citizenship. For $250,000 you can claim St. Kitts and Nevis as home, and for $100,000 you’ve got yourself a passport from Dominica, both of which are Caribbean island nations. Others, like Austria, have a visa by investment program that comes with coveted EU access. It’s not surprising, then, that immigrants make up 15.7 percent of Austria’s population.

While not quite a desirable model, Gulf states like UAE, Qatar, Kuwait and Bahrain have an immigration population of up to 83.7 percent. Resource-rich, these business-driven nations are hungry for migrant workers who, in the case of Qatar, are greeted by “modern day slavery” working conditions. Though, in some cases, advocates say, it’s not so different in the United States.

World Series: Madison Bumgarner Carries Giants To 3rd Title In 5 Years

Oct 30, 2014   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on World Series: Madison Bumgarner Carries Giants To 3rd Title In 5 Years
Updated on Oct. 30 at 1:45 a.m. ET.

San Francisco Giants pitcher Madison Bumgarner throws during the fifth inning of Game 7 of the World Series. He was also the winning starting pitcher in Game 1 and Game 5.i
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San Francisco Giants pitcher Madison Bumgarner throws during the fifth inning of Game 7 of the World Series. He was also the winning starting pitcher in Game 1 and Game 5.

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San Francisco Giants pitcher Madison Bumgarner throws during the fifth inning of Game 7 of the World Series. He was also the winning starting pitcher in Game 1 and Game 5.

San Francisco Giants pitcher Madison Bumgarner throws during the fifth inning of Game 7 of the World Series. He was also the winning starting pitcher in Game 1 and Game 5.

Jeff Roberson/AP

Kansas City Royals catcher Salvador Perez lies on the ground after being hit by a pitch by San Francisco Giants Tim Hudson on Wednesday night during the second inning of Game 7 of baseball's World Series in Kansas City, Mo.i
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Kansas City Royals catcher Salvador Perez lies on the ground after being hit by a pitch by San Francisco Giants Tim Hudson on Wednesday night during the second inning of Game 7 of baseball’s World Series in Kansas City, Mo.

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Kansas City Royals catcher Salvador Perez lies on the ground after being hit by a pitch by San Francisco Giants Tim Hudson on Wednesday night during the second inning of Game 7 of baseball's World Series in Kansas City, Mo.

Kansas City Royals catcher Salvador Perez lies on the ground after being hit by a pitch by San Francisco Giants Tim Hudson on Wednesday night during the second inning of Game 7 of baseball’s World Series in Kansas City, Mo.

Charlie Riedel/AP

Madison Bumgarner won Game 1 of this World Series, throwing seven innings and giving up one run on three hits. He won Game 5, throwing a complete game shutout.

And on Wednesday night, completing one of the most impressive postseason pitching performances in history, he won Game 7, pitching the final five innings on two days rest, giving up just two hits as the Giants won the game 3-2, and won the World Series.

All told he gave up just nine hits and one run in 21 innings of World Series action as the Giants won their third title in five years. He struck out 17 while walking just one Royals batter.

The Royals, making their first World Series appearance since 1985, seemed in many ways a team of destiny early in the postseason as they won their first eight games, half in extra innings. But Bumgarner came into Kauffman Stadium and took a pair of wins.

The Associated Press notes that only Randy Johnson with the Arizona Diamondbacks in 2001 had also won three games in a World Series in recent decades.

At Civic Center Plaza in San Francisco, “a mass of humanity partied on the lawns” after watching the game on a jumbo screen, SF Gate reports.

“A New Orleans style jazz band formed after the final out and held an impromptu parade in front of the San Francisco Library and Asian Art Museum, with at least 100 people dancing along and shouting. Fans stood shoulder to shoulder screaming and cheering amid a horn-honking hootenanny outside bars in the Mission, South of Market and throughout downtown.”

Fans celebrate the Giants' victory during a television-viewing event at the Civic Center in San Francisco.i
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Fans celebrate the Giants’ victory during a television-viewing event at the Civic Center in San Francisco.

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Fans celebrate the Giants' victory during a television-viewing event at the Civic Center in San Francisco.

Fans celebrate the Giants’ victory during a television-viewing event at the Civic Center in San Francisco.

Robert Galbraith/Reuters/Landov

An official parade is planned for Friday, Mayor Edwin Lee said on Twitter:

The Kansas City Star opened its recap of the game this way:

“They had known loneliness and they had felt despair. This lost generation of fans had been left behind and cast aside across 29 seasons without October, the most bittersweet month in baseball. They never knew the exhilaration the playoffs could provide. They never knew the exquisite torture that lurks at the roller coaster’s end for every team but one.

“The 2014 Kansas City Royals believed they could be the one. They believed they could lift up this city and raise it to the throne they had abdicated after 1985. The players felt it in their bones. Their manager espoused his faith daily to the public. Belief is the most beautiful armor, capable of shielding all the frailties of a baseball club, the qualities that leaked into view in a 3-2 loss to San Francisco on Wednesday night at Kauffman Stadium.”

Kansas City Royals fans watch their team's defeat in the Power and Light District during Game 7 of the World Series on Wedensday in Kansas City, Mo.i
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Kansas City Royals fans watch their team’s defeat in the Power and Light District during Game 7 of the World Series on Wedensday in Kansas City, Mo.

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Kansas City Royals fans watch their team's defeat in the Power and Light District during Game 7 of the World Series on Wedensday in Kansas City, Mo.

Kansas City Royals fans watch their team’s defeat in the Power and Light District during Game 7 of the World Series on Wedensday in Kansas City, Mo.

Julie Denesha/Getty Images

The team got a taste, but ultimately Bumgarner “crushed their dreams,” the Star says. While fans in San Francisco partied in the streets, inside the Kansas City clubhouse, the paper reports, “the eyes of the Royals were either red or hollow. The room was quiet save for the sound bags being packed, noses sniffling and farewells being issued.”

Latitudes: Top 10 Musical Discoveries From WOMEX 2014

Oct 29, 2014   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on Latitudes: Top 10 Musical Discoveries From WOMEX 2014
  • The endlessly innovative Sardinian guitarist and singer Paolo Angeli created carefully constructed yet dreamy music with his souped-up guitar at an Oct. 23 daytime showcase. One of the first sets during this year's event, Angeli set the pace for musicianship and excitement.

  • Hats, undershirts, folk, punk: Russia's Otava Yo brought huge energy and good humor to their Oct. 23 performance.

  • Long a sideman, Honduran guitarist Guayo Cedeño stepped into the limelight with a fantastic set that combined cumbia and surf guitar on the first night of WOMEX showcases, Oct. 23.

  • South Korean group Noreum Machi brought a wild, shamanistic energy to their Oct. 24th WOMEX showcase.

  • Congolese-Belgian singer Baloji — already a veteran of New York's globalFEST — turned in one of the most talked-about and self-assured sets at WOMEX Oct. 24.

  • One of the biggest surprises of this year's edition of WOMEX was Maru Tarang, a group that blends Rajasthani folk music with Western slide guitar.

  • In their late-night Oct. 24 set, Angolan-Portuguese band Batida blended a vintage 1970s Angolan sound with modern electronic dance music and a socially conscious perspective.

  • Smoky-voiced Portuguese singer and guitarist Lula Pena mixed her native land's fado style with an international blend of Cape Verdean, Brazilian and French sounds in her eclectic Oct. 25 performance.

  • Arizona's Orkesta Mendoza — the only U.S.-based group to perform at WOMEX 2014 — turned in a blistering set Oct. 25.

  • Galicia's own sweet-voiced Davide Salvado mixed ancient traditional songs with a modern attitude in his Oct. 25 performance.

  • Mexican horns most certainly don't automatically mean mariachi. Heavy jazz, driven hard by brass and drums, was what the Mexican band Troker offered at their Oct. 25 showcase.

  • Colombia's Tribu Baharú transformed the WOMEX tent into a sweaty dance party with their high-energy, very entertaining take on Afro-Colombian champeta music.

Last week I was on the road in the northwest of Spain, in the city of Santiago de Compostela, to attend WOMEX. This was the event’s 20th-anniversary edition, and it was like a SXSW for international music: five days of nonstop showcases, panel discussions, meetings, film screenings and schmoozing for professionals interested in sounds from across the globe. This year attracted more than 2000 attendees from about 100 countries on nearly every continent.

I came home totally revved up and inspired by what I heard and saw. This year’s WOMEX — I’ve attended six others — proved to be an incredibly strong one for Latin and Caribbean music, thanks to acts like Honduras’ Guayo Cedeño, Colombia’s Tribu Baharú and Mexico’s Troker.

A few artists and groups I already knew and loved were out in full force this year, like the Congolese-Belgian singer Baloji; his relentlessly tight show was so good, I just couldn’t tear myself away. It was the same with the utterly charming El Gusto Orchestra from Algeria, whom I featured in a radio piece last year. Another was the recently renamed Orkesta Mendoza, the only U.S. group to showcase at WOMEX this year. (We loved them so much under their old moniker, Sergio Mendoza y Su Orkesta, we made a Field Recording with them.)

There were also some more commercial acts who are sure to get a lot of international attention out of their WOMEX appearances. I heard buzz about artists like Morocco’s Oum, who blends a breathy soprano with jazz and splashes of North African color, Ethiocolor‘s high-spirited, uptempo folkloric voyage through various Ethiopian styles, and Israel’s Ester Rada, who uses her huge voice to pair soul with the woozy brass of her native Ethiopia.

The most exciting artists I heard this year were new to me, and they tended to be either hard-driving modernists or performers who presented roots music in innovative ways.

Most of the evening showcases overlapped, so I know that despite all my efforts in maneuvering through Santiago’s old quarter, near its pilgrim destination of the Santiago Cathedral, I missed all sorts of wonderful stuff. Maybe by the time next year’s event lands in Budapest I’ll have finally figured out how to clone myself.

Ghosts In The Music: A Spooky Songs Quiz

Oct 29, 2014   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on Ghosts In The Music: A Spooky Songs Quiz

Ghosts, both friendly and fiendish, make appearances in a wide range of songs.

Ghosts, both friendly and fiendish, make appearances in a wide range of songs.

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Where would Halloween be without ghosts — those wispy spirits either friendly or fiendish in disposition? They’ve haunted our consciousness for ages, thanks to appearances in visual art, literature, film and music. And now they’ve overrun this puzzler. From country and classical to rock and jazz, ghosts glide through these songs. Some are nice, others nefarious. Score high and allow yourself to be treated today. Score low and consider yourself tricked.

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