Browsing articles from "September, 2014"

Tommy Boggs, Influential Lobbyist, Dies At 73

Sep 16, 2014   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on Tommy Boggs, Influential Lobbyist, Dies At 73

Thomas H. Boggs, Jr., during a 1997 oath of office ceremony for his mother, Lindy Boggs, who became ambassador to the Vatican.i
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Thomas H. Boggs, Jr., during a 1997 oath of office ceremony for his mother, Lindy Boggs, who became ambassador to the Vatican.

Tommy Boggs, a long-time lobbyist who in many ways epitomized the Washington establishment, has died. His sister, Morning Edition commentator Cokie Roberts, said he apparently had a heart attack.

Thomas Hale Boggs Jr., 73, pioneered a new, more professional way of lobbying starting in the 1960s, when he saw how power in Washington was becoming more diffuse. Clout on Capitol Hill spread from the House and Senate leadership to more junior members, especially in reforms after the Watergate scandal. In the executive branch, the number of regulatory agencies increased.

As Boggs said in a 1994 talk at American University, “In the ’60s, if you had the president of the United States behind something, and if you had the speaker of the House and the majority leader of the Senate, and the respective chairmen of the committees of jurisdiction and the ranking minority members – that handful of people could basically get anything done or stop anything in this town.”

But starting in the 1970s, he said, the executive and legislative branches stopped trusting each other. Then partisan animosity increased. Newly elected lawmakers, especially in the House, took power away from the traditional leaders and made more congressional work visible to the public.

This meant that lobbyists had to become technical experts on their clients’ behalf. They still had to work Capitol Hill the old-fashioned way, but also had to know the technical ins and outs of legislation and regulations. And with campaign contribution limits imposed after Watergate, congressional fundraising became a critical sideline for lobbyists.

Boggs’s firm, now known as Squire Patton Boggs, became a much-copied powerhouse by hiring lawyers and lobbyists for one-stop shopping. Among his high-profile lobbying roles were crafting the 1979 bailout of Chrysler and the 1993 passage of the North American Free Trade Agreement.

Boggs was born to politics. His father was Thomas Hale Boggs Sr., the House majority leader when he died in a plane crash in 1972. His mother was Corrine “Lindy” Boggs, who succeeded Hale Boggs in Congress. They were New Orleans Democrats.

Tommy Boggs started his career as a congressional elevator operator. He ran for the House once, unsuccessfully, before becoming a lobbyist. Meanwhile, his sister Cokie has had a long career as a Washington journalist. Another sister, Barbara Boggs Sigmund, was long-time mayor of the borough of Princeton, N.J.

Expanding Mission In Iraq, U.S. Strikes Fighters South Of Baghdad

Sep 16, 2014   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on Expanding Mission In Iraq, U.S. Strikes Fighters South Of Baghdad

With air strikes on the Islamic State south of Baghdad, the United States officially expanded its mission in Iraq on Sunday and Monday.

According to Central Command, Iraqi Security Forces requested the airstrikes near Sinjar.

“The airstrike southwest of Baghdad was the first strike taken as part of our expanded efforts beyond protecting our own people and humanitarian missions to hit ISIL targets as Iraqi forces go on offense, as outlined in the President’s speech last Wednesday,” Central Command said in a press release.

The military added that the strikes destroyed six Islamic State vehicles and a “fighting position southwest of Baghdad that was firing on ISF personnel.”

In an August interview with The New York Times, President Obama vowed that “the United States had no intention of ‘being the Iraqi air force.'”

But, then in a prime-time speech to the American public, Obama announced a broader mission against the Islamic State, saying the United States ultimately wanted to “destroy” the Sunni militant group.

500 Migrants Feared Dead After Boat Sinks In Mediterranean

Sep 15, 2014   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on 500 Migrants Feared Dead After Boat Sinks In Mediterranean

An Armed Forces of Malta (AFM) ship carrying rescued migrants arrives at the AFM Maritime Squadron base at Haywharf in Valletta's Marsamxett Harbour in October of last year. The number of migrants trying to make their way from the North African coast to European waters has ballooned in recent years.i
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An Armed Forces of Malta (AFM) ship carrying rescued migrants arrives at the AFM Maritime Squadron base at Haywharf in Valletta’s Marsamxett Harbour in October of last year. The number of migrants trying to make their way from the North African coast to European waters has ballooned in recent years.

Darrin Zammit Lupi/Reuters/Landov


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Darrin Zammit Lupi/Reuters/Landov

An Armed Forces of Malta (AFM) ship carrying rescued migrants arrives at the AFM Maritime Squadron base at Haywharf in Valletta's Marsamxett Harbour in October of last year. The number of migrants trying to make their way from the North African coast to European waters has ballooned in recent years.

An Armed Forces of Malta (AFM) ship carrying rescued migrants arrives at the AFM Maritime Squadron base at Haywharf in Valletta’s Marsamxett Harbour in October of last year. The number of migrants trying to make their way from the North African coast to European waters has ballooned in recent years.

Darrin Zammit Lupi/Reuters/Landov

Some 500 migrants trying to make their way from Egypt to Malta by boat are believed to have drowned last week after people smugglers reportedly rammed and sank their vessel, according to the International Organization for Migration.

The IOM report is based on reports from the few survivors of the tragedy who say the group of Syrians, Palestinians, Egyptians and Sudanese had hoped to eventually reach Europe.

In a separate incident, some 70 Libyans were feared drowned in a similar tragedy involving the sinking of a migrant boat.

The Telegraph says of the first tragedy that “if confirmed [it] would rank as the worst disaster in the Mediterranean for years.”

The newspaper says the story “was recounted by two Palestinians who spent more than a day floating in the water before being picked up by a Panama-flagged merchant vessel about 300 miles off Malta.

“They were brought to the port of Pozzallo in Sicily at the weekend, where they told their story to IoM officials.

“Nine other survivors were rescued by Greek and Maltese rescue vessels.”

The survivors said there had been a confrontation as smugglers tried to move migrants to a smaller boat. International Organization of Migrants spokeswoman Christiane Berthiaume told The Associated Press that “used one boat to knock the other,” apparently causing the sinking.

By way of background, The AP says: “Refugee numbers have swelled as thousands of people flee conflicts in Syria, Iraq and across the Middle East and Africa, boarding unsafe smugglers’ boats in Libya. Nearly 110,000 people have been rescued since January, but at least 1,889 others have died making the perilous crossing, according to the U.N. refugee agency.”

We have reported on a number of such incidents in the past, going back as far as 2011.

Last month, NPR’s Sylvia Poggioli reported on Italy’s efforts to tackle the problem, saying: “Reports of migrant boats in distress have become a near-daily news headline over the past year.”

KEXP Presents: Diarrhea Planet

Sep 15, 2014   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on KEXP Presents: Diarrhea Planet

Its name sounds like nowhere you’d want to be, and not necessarily something you’d want to hear, but Diarrhea Planet makes amazing music. Six guys from Nashville — four of them playing guitar! — live the credo of “Shred ‘Til You’re Dead” by blasting a fiery torrent of riff-heavy good times in a reverently irreverent mix of garage, punk, and ’80s rock.

Those of us watching could barely hold it in as Diarrhea Planet’s members tore up our tiny studio at KEXP last month, ripping guitar licks with their teeth and high-fiving all the while.

SET LIST
  • “Lite Dream”

Watch the rest of Diarrhea Planet’s performance on KEXP’s YouTube channel.

Sergio Mendes On Jazz, Luck And ‘The Magic Of The Encounter’

Sep 15, 2014   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on Sergio Mendes On Jazz, Luck And ‘The Magic Of The Encounter’

Sergio Mendes, shown here in August 2014, grew up with classical music. But when he heard a jazz record for the first time, he fell in love with the improvisational possibilities.i
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Sergio Mendes, shown here in August 2014, grew up with classical music. But when he heard a jazz record for the first time, he fell in love with the improvisational possibilities.

Omar Vega/Invision/AP


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Omar Vega/Invision/AP

Sergio Mendes, shown here in August 2014, grew up with classical music. But when he heard a jazz record for the first time, he fell in love with the improvisational possibilities.

Sergio Mendes, shown here in August 2014, grew up with classical music. But when he heard a jazz record for the first time, he fell in love with the improvisational possibilities.

Omar Vega/Invision/AP

As part of a series called “My Big Break,” All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

For more than five decades, Brazilian pianist, composer and bandleader Sergio Mendes has been charming audiences around the world with his signature mix of pop, jazz and bossa nova. Mendes is out now with a new album of collaborations called Magic, and he stopped by NPR West to tell All Things Considered about his early career breakthroughs.

Mendes says much of his success has come through a lifetime of serendipitous meetings.

“I call it the magic of the encounter,” he says: “the magic of encountering people that helped me, that support me. My life has been very much a succession of those moments. … I feel very humble about that.”

From Beethoven To Brubeck

Mendes was born in the Brazilian city of Niterói, where his love for music began with classical piano. But when Mendes was around 12 years old, a childhood friend first introduced him to a Dave Brubeck jazz record, and the song “Take Five.”

“For me that was like, I would say, one of the incredible moments of my life,” Mendes remembers. “Because when I heard that, I had no idea about jazz or anything. So the whole world of jazz for me was like, ‘Wow, what is that?’ “

Mendes says he was drawn away from classical music by the “freedom of improvisation” in jazz.

“I love to try new things,” he says. “The idea that you could improvise and you have under it fantastic harmonies, chords — I mean, for me, that was magical.”

Mendes went from playing Chopin, Mozart and Beethoven to Brubeck, Getz and Gillespie.

At the same time, American jazz musicians were discovering Brazilian rhythms and creating a wave of interest in bossa nova.

Coming To America

By the time he was a teenager, Mendes was playing piano in jazz clubs in Brazil, and learning to play songs written by other Brazilian musicians, like Antônio Carlos Jobim.

Mendes came to the United States in 1962, where he joined other Brazilian and American musicians Carnegie Hall for a celebration of bossa nova.

He liked what he saw. In 1964, Mendes says, he came to the United States for good, landing in Los Angeles along with members of his band from Brazil.

At first, the going was not easy.

His Brazilian bandmates returned home, forcing Mendes to form a new group.

Mendes got to know Tom and Geordie Hormel, who owned a recording studio and loved Brazilian music. They allowed Mendes to record and audition in front of record companies, but most of those auditions went nowhere.

“We’d play three, four, five songs” for record producers, Mendes says, but, at first, those auditions were dead-ends.

“No answer, nothing,” Mendes says, “just, ‘Oh, thank you. You guys sounds great, bye.’ “

The album Herb Alpert Presents Sergio Mendes  Brasil '66 gave Mendes his first hit song, Mas Que Nada, and his big break.i
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The album Herb Alpert Presents Sergio Mendes Brasil ’66 gave Mendes his first hit song, “Mas Que Nada,” and his big break.

AM Records


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AM Records

The album Herb Alpert Presents Sergio Mendes  Brasil '66 gave Mendes his first hit song, Mas Que Nada, and his big break.

The album Herb Alpert Presents Sergio Mendes Brasil ’66 gave Mendes his first hit song, “Mas Que Nada,” and his big break.

AM Records

AM: Alpert And Moss

Then one day, Mendes remembers, two “good-looking young guys” walked into the studio to hear his band, now called Brasil ’66.

The two men were Herb Alpert, known for his group The Tijuana Brass, and Jerry Moss. Together, they founded the record label AM.

After performing a few songs, Mendes spoke to Alpert. “He said to me, ‘I really like your sound, I would like to sign you with our record company,'” Mendes recalls. “It was like, ‘Wow, really? Great. Here we go!’ “

Together they created the album Herb Alpert Presents Sergio Mendes and Brasil ’66.

The album’s first track was “Mas Que Nada,” a song written by Brazilian musician Jorge Ben, which Mendes learned while performing in Brazil.

The arrangement from Mendes and the performance by Brasil ’66 sent the song climbing up the Billboard charts.

“It was the first time that a song in Portuguese was a hit in America and all over the world,” says Mendes.

He was no longer a struggling musician.

He upgraded from his one-bedroom apartment in Glendale, Calif., to a three-bedroom apartment in Laurel Canyon, and he bought his first car, a gray 1966 Pontiac LeMans.

Nearly five decades later, Mendes still credits the song with transforming his career, and his life.

“That’s the song that gave me my first big break,” Mendes says. “I still love playing it. I never got tired of it.”

Envisioning Landscapes Of Our Very Distant Future

Sep 15, 2014   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on Envisioning Landscapes Of Our Very Distant Future

An aerial view of Posiva Oy's prospective nuclear waste repository site in Olkiluoto, Finland.i
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An aerial view of Posiva Oy’s prospective nuclear waste repository site in Olkiluoto, Finland.

Posiva Oy


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Posiva Oy

An aerial view of Posiva Oy's prospective nuclear waste repository site in Olkiluoto, Finland.

An aerial view of Posiva Oy’s prospective nuclear waste repository site in Olkiluoto, Finland.

Posiva Oy

A few minutes before my flight to Helsinki touched down, I looked out the window at Finland’s flat, snowy, forested landscape. It appeared still and serene.

It was December 2011, and I was moving to Finland to conduct anthropological fieldwork among experts developing what might, in the early 2020s, become the world’s first operational geological repository for high-level nuclear waste.

As an anthropologist, my goal was to examine how these experts think about the future, how they conceive of the world around them, and how they relate to themselves and to their colleagues.

My main interest was in Finnish nuclear waste management company Posiva Oy’s Safety Case project — which challenged experts to forecast geological, ecological and climatological changes that might befall the repository site in Olkiluoto, Western Finland, over the millennia. What sort of scientific ethos, I wondered, do Safety Case experts adopt in their daily dealings with seemingly unimaginable spans of time? Has their work affected how they understand the world and humanity’s place within it? If so, how? If not, why not?

To pursue these questions, I would live in Finland for more than two and a half years. I would converse with the Safety Case experts in person. I would read their technical reports, hear out their critics, mull over Michael Madsen’s 2010 documentary about them and visit them at work. I would get coffee, lunch or drinks with them whenever possible. To understand Finland’s distant futures anthropologically, I would learn to see them through Safety Case experts’ eyes.

During my fieldwork, Posiva’s Biosphere Assessment (BSA) project piqued my interest. The BSA is an elaborate forecast of potential changes within Olkiluoto’s surface-level ecosystems during the 10,000 years from 2020 to 12020. The BSA also projects paths that radionuclides might take if they were to escape from the repository, to make their way upward through groundwater channels, and to then disperse on Earth’s surface. The BSA seeks to demonstrate that radiological consequences to future humans and other organisms would not exceed regulatory limits — even in the most severe distant future leakage scenarios.

For the Safety Case experts, the BSA was but one report developed for submission to Finland’s Ministry of Employment the Economy (TEM) and to Finland’s Radiation Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK). It was part of Posiva’s application for a permit to begin formal construction of its prospective Olkiluoto repository.

For me, as an anthropologist, however, the BSA became something very different: It became a tool helping me see Finland’s landscape’s distant pasts and futures in a new way. This became evident to me in December 2013, when I looked upon Finland from an airplane window once again. I realized then that something about my sense of its landscape had changed. Rather than stillness and serenity, I saw a terrain on the move.

I imagined the enormous Ice Age ice sheet that, 20,000 years ago, covered the land below. I imagined Finland decompressing when this enormous ice sheet later receded — its shorelines extending outward as Finland’s elevation rose ever higher above sea level. I imagined coastal areas of Finland emerging from the ice around 10,000 BC. I imagined lakes, rivers, forests and human settlements sprouting up, disappearing and changing shape and size over the millennia.

I then considered the challenge BSA experts confront in projecting how this landscape will change in futures near and distant. At what pace will Finland’s shoreline continue expanding outward into the Baltic Sea? How will human and animal populations’ habits change? What happens if forest fires, soil erosion or floods occur? How and where will lakes, rivers and forests sprout up, shrink and grow? What role will climate change play in all this?

The BSA taught me how to see a Finland in flux — a Finland dwelling within the long timespans of what historian Martin Rudwick or physicist and science fiction author Gregory Benford might call “deep time.”

I reflect, now, on how my anthropological fieldwork altered my own sense of our planet’s landscapes. I reflect on what insights we, as inhabitants of a planet wracked by environmental crises, can glean from the BSA’s data-driven, highly-technical grappling with Earth’s radical long-term. I will close with one such insight.

Many suggest we have entered the Anthropocene — a new geologic epoch ushered in by humanity’s own transformations of Earth’s climate, erosion patterns, extinctions, atmosphere and rock record. In such circumstances, we are challenged to adopt new ways of living, thinking and understanding our relationships with our planetary environment. To do so, anthropologist Richard Irvine has argued, we must first “be open to deep time.” We must, as Stewart Brand has urged, inhabit a longer “now.”

So, I wonder: Could it be that nuclear waste repository projects — long approached by environmentalists and critical intellectuals with skepticism — are developing among the best tools for re-thinking humanity’s place within the deeper history of our environment? Could opening ourselves – as BSA experts do – to deep, geologic, planetary timescales inspire positive change in our ways of living on a damaged planet?

Vincent F. Ialenti is a U.S. National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow and a PhD Candidate in Cornell University’s Department of Anthropology. He holds an MSc in “Law, Anthropology Society” from the London School of Economics. Look for more on deep time from Vincent in 13.7 in the coming weeks.

Bob Marley’s ‘Legend’ Album Finally Cracks Billboard Top 10

Sep 14, 2014   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Bob Marley’s ‘Legend’ Album Finally Cracks Billboard Top 10

Bob Marley, seen here performing in Paris in 1980, died years before Legend was released. It has since sold millions of copies — and this week, it hit No. 5 on the Billboard chart.i
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Bob Marley, seen here performing in Paris in 1980, died years before Legend was released. It has since sold millions of copies — and this week, it hit No. 5 on the Billboard chart.

Guidot Lou/Dalle /Landov


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Bob Marley, seen here performing in Paris in 1980, died years before Legend was released. It has since sold millions of copies — and this week, it hit No. 5 on the Billboard chart.

Bob Marley, seen here performing in Paris in 1980, died years before Legend was released. It has since sold millions of copies — and this week, it hit No. 5 on the Billboard chart.

Guidot Lou/Dalle /Landov

Billboard’s album sales chart has a new entry in its No. 5 spot: Legend, the greatest hits record by Bob Marley and the Wailers. It’s the highest spot ever for Marley. And while the 30-year-old album has sold millions of copies over the years, it only reached No. 54 when it was released.

The new rise of Legend is tied to a special price cut. Billboard reports that sales of the album rose more than 1,000 percent after music service Google Play slashed the price from around $9 to 99 cents. On the new Billboard 200 chart, Legend is wedged between Ariana Grande and Counting Crows — starkly different company from its debut in 1984, when albums by Michael Jackson (Thriller) and Prince (Purple Rain) dominated the No. 1 spot.

“We love to celebrate artists like Bob Marley whose music is timeless and beloved,” Google Play’s Gwen Shen tells Billboard. “Our hope is that this promotion … will introduce his music to the next generation of fans and continue his legacy.”

The rise to the top 10 came on the strength of more than 40,000 sales. Rolling Stone reports:

“Billboard and Nielsen SoundScan usually haven’t counted sales tallied by digital music retailers’ massive price reductions or giveaways, like when Google Play allowed people to download Katy Perry’s Prism for free. After Lady Gaga offered Born This Way as a $1 download in the Amazon Marketplace in an attempt to sell a million copies in its first week of release, Billboard and Nielsen put rules in place to disqualify that type of sales manipulation from the charts. However, Google Play’s Legend pricing skirts those bylaws thanks to the album being a 30-year-old “catalog” release.”

While the 99-cent price brought a rush of interest, Legend has been doing pretty well in sales, with at least 15 million copies sold since it was released in 1984, Billboard says. A few thousand are still sold each week.

Marley died in 1981. His work with the Wailers was mentioned in NPR Music’s discussion of “the albums everyone loves,” with the 1977 record Exodus mentioned as a highlight. But it was 1976’s Rastaman Vibration that had previously been Marley and the Wailers’ highest-charting album, at No. 8.

As NPR reported in June, while its membership has shifted over the years, the Wailers visited the U.S. this summer to play a tour celebrating Legend’s anniversary.

Greg Norman Says He’s Lucky Not To Have Cut His Hand Off

Sep 14, 2014   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Greg Norman Says He’s Lucky Not To Have Cut His Hand Off

Posting photos this weekend that show him recovering from a chainsaw accident, Australian golfer Greg Norman says he’s a lucky man. Norman says he hurt his left hand while cutting branches off a tree at his home in Florida.

Norman, 59, a former world No. 1 player who went on to a successful business career that includes ventures in sport, apparel, and wine, announced his injury via Instagram Saturday by posting a photo of himself in a hospital bed.

He wrote, “Working with a chainsaw ALWAYS be respectful of the unexpected. I was one lucky man today. Damaged, but not down out. Still have left hand.”

Norman tells the AP that he narrowly avoided hurting himself even worse:

“Thank God the blade wasn’t running full speed or it would have taken my hand off. I handled everything as calmly as I could. There is no major damage. There is nerve damage, but no muscular damage. They fixed me up and here I am.”

Norman says he won’t stop doing his own work, whether it involves a chainsaw or a bulldozer. And he tells the AP that he was surprised by the many comments and notes of support his photo post had sparked.

On Sunday morning, Norman posted an update to Instagram, in which he’s shown shirtless and giving a thumbs-up sign. He’s also sporting gauze on his wrist — and a large purple foam device that protects his injury.

“Thank u all for your concern good wishes,” he wrote. “All well the morning after the accident. Here I am at the scene of the crime… w/my new fashion statement!”

Jazz Pianist Joe Sample Dies At 75

Sep 13, 2014   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on Jazz Pianist Joe Sample Dies At 75

Sample was a founder of the band the Jazz Crusaders and reportedly played with musicians from Miles Davis and B.B. King to Steely Dan and the Supremes. NPR’s Arun Rath has this remembrance.

ISIS Video Purports To Show Beheading Of British Aid Worker

Sep 13, 2014   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on ISIS Video Purports To Show Beheading Of British Aid Worker

Update at 7:25 p.m. EDT

The militant group that calls itself the Islamic State has released a video that purportedly shows the beheading of British aid worker David Haines.

The authenticity of the video, which appeared online Saturday, has not been confirmed.

The organization, also known as ISIS, had threatened to kill Haines just under two weeks ago, in an earlier video that showed the beheading of an American journalist. Haines’ family issued a public plea to his captors asking ISIS to make contact with them, as The Associated Press reported earlier in the day.

Haines, an international aid worker, was abducted in Syria in 2013. “The British government had managed to keep his kidnapping secret out of concern for his safety until the most recent video Islamic State video identified him as a captive,” the AP writes.

The BBC reports that the father of two from Perth, Scotland, was kidnapped shortly after he began working with a French relief agency called ACTED. With At his posting there, Haines was “working in the Atmeh refugee camp … supplying water, food and tents.”

Over the past decade and a half he’d worked with a variety of aid agencies, writes the BBC: “He had worked with a German charity on post-war reconstruction projects in Croatia, including housing and demining. He was also involved in efforts to help displaced people to return to their homes. In 2011 he became Head of Mission in Libya for Handicap International,” an organization that works to help vulnerable people with disabilities.

“The following year he joined another agency, the Nonviolence Peaceforce (NP), and went to South Sudan,” where he worked as an unarmed civilian peacekeeper.

ISIS previously released two videos showing the beheadings of two American journalists, which were confirmed by U.S. officials to be authentic. The first video, which showed the killing of James Foley, was released on August 20. The second, which showed the beheading of Steven Sotloff and contained the threat directed towards Haines, was released on Sept. 2.

The newest video, like those previous videos, appears to name another Western hostage as a future target.

Correspondent Alice Fordham, reporting for NPR’s Newscast unit, says the video begins with footage of British prime minister David Cameron. The two previous videos began with footage of President Obama.

The man identified as Haines, Alice reports, is shown “kneeling in a featureless desert in an orange robe.”

The video appears to be recent, Alice says: “The assailant refers to the bombing of Iraq’s Haditha dam a week ago. Another man identified as a British hostage appears at the end as the masked man exhorts Prime Minister Cameron to stop fighting the Islamic State.”

Cameron has tweeted a response, writing, “We will do everything in our power to hunt down these murderers and ensure they face justice, however long it takes.”

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  • EDT: 2019-09-15 07:02 PM
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