Browsing articles from "August, 2014"

Rare Good News Regarding 5 Ebola Patients In Nigeria

Aug 19, 2014   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Rare Good News Regarding 5 Ebola Patients In Nigeria

David Greene talks to freelance journalist Yinka Ibukun for the latest news about the Ebola outbreak in Lagos, Nigeria.

Skateboarder Jay Adams Dies At 53

Aug 19, 2014   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Skateboarder Jay Adams Dies At 53

Legendary skateboarder Jay Adams has died. The 53-year-old skater and surfer was a member of Southern California’s Z-Boys team, immortalized in the documentary “Dogtown and Z-Boys.”

Broken Teeth And Fake-umentaries: Another Shark Week Gone By

Aug 18, 2014   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on Broken Teeth And Fake-umentaries: Another Shark Week Gone By

A great white shark — one of many you'll see on Discovery's Shark Week.i
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A great white shark — one of many you’ll see on Discovery’s Shark Week.

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A great white shark — one of many you'll see on Discovery's Shark Week.

A great white shark — one of many you’ll see on Discovery’s Shark Week.

Chris Fallows/Discovery Channel

A great white attacks a submersible “SharkCam” deployed by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, shattering its teeth on the metal bite-proof cylinder. Off Baja California, the crew of a research boat feeds a single great white 400 pounds of tuna in a boyish science test to see how much one shark can eat. A TV crew travels to New Zealand on a campy expedition to document a mythical giant shark. A commercial fishing vessel drops its nets into thousands of feet of water to catch rare “alien sharks.”

This is just some of the stuff of Discovery Channel’s Shark Week, which just wrapped its 27th rendition. The hit summer series was once observed with some respect by serious members of the scientific community. Through the decades, however, it has devolved into a B-movie-style blend of fiction, bad acting, a few facts and potential injuries to sharks.

In some of the shows, real scientists are featured onboard real research vessels at sea. However, their chief priority, beneath flimsy scientific premises, seems always to be landing sweet video footage of sharks biting stuff.

Shark Week first aired in 1988.

“As late as 1995 and 1996, it was almost exclusively about conservation and exploration,” says Sean Van Sommeran, founder of the Pelagic Shark Research Foundation in Santa Cruz. “Now, it’s big game trophy fishing, extreme sports diving and science fiction monster sharks that sink ships in the night. The science highlighted is wildly speculative and harmful.”

One of the underlying problems with Shark Week, Van Sommeran says, is a basic failure to understand sharks as real wild animals.

“Sharks aren’t from Mars, they’re wildlife, and one of the most basic tenets of wildlife care is ‘don’t feed the wildlife,'” Van Sommeran says. “Of course this applies to large, potentially hazardous sharks, same as with other wild, potentially dangerous large predators.”

Almost every show on Discovery Channel this week has involved tossing hunks of meat or fish to sharks—activity that Van Sommeran says conditions sharks to associate humans with food, creating a potentially dangerous interface at swimming and snorkeling sites. Other programs on Shark Week depict researchers catching sharks on hook and line and, eventually, wrestling with the fish and trying to place tags in their hide.

“The science fiction stuff [on Shark Week] doesn’t help sharks in the least, and the science is all too often speculative and contrived. Moreover, it often involves injuring the sharks needlessly,” Van Sommeran says.

Peter Knights, of the environmental group WildAid, told NPR last week that Shark Week does much more to harm sharks than it does to help them, largely by portraying them as man-eaters—a reputation that conservationists and educators have been trying earnestly to dispel for years. Shark Week, they say, isn’t helping.

Viewers of 2014 Shark Week have watched programs with titles like “Alien Sharks,” “Zombie Sharks,” “Sharkageddon, “Great White Serial Killer,” and “Sharkpocalypse,” and Americans are devouring it. Last year, Shark Week set viewership records. This year, even more people watched.

To be fair, there is some amazing visual candy to be found on TV and at the Shark Week website this week—like the frightening footage from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution’s “SharkCam” of great white sharks in Mexico attacking their sturdy metal submersible. But in at least one attack sequence recorded by the submerged cameras, a shower of shattered tooth fragments falls from a shark’s mouth.

“It’s not a dire injury to the shark, and teeth grow back, but those teeth will be out of commission for a few weeks,” Van Sommeran says, pointing out that the camera could have been padded to protect the sharks’ teeth.

In “Alien Sharks,” we meet a young grad student whose job, we’re told, is rescuing accidentally caught sharks from a commercial fishing boat’s trawl nets. However, skeptical viewers may have noticed that the fishermen caught almost nothing but strange deep-water sharks, and might reasonably wonder if they were targeting these “aliens” for the benefit of Shark Week cameras.

In perhaps the worst of Shark Week’s programs, mythical creatures are presented as real animals to viewers who don’t know any better. In 2013, Discovery Channel featured a Megalodon documentary in which scientists go looking for the extinct shark. Undaunted by sharp criticism it received for the bogus show, which polls showed had most viewers totally fooled, Discovery Channel came back this year with more fiction-as-fact, including a feature about a legendary 20-plus-foot hammerhead named “Old Hitler,” a fake documentary about a boat called Joy Ride that sinks in sharky waters, and more efforts to convince us that Megalodon still cruises near popular beaches. (Last year, Discovery stood by its Megalodon piece and pointed out its disclaimers.)

On Wednesday night, “Lair of the Mega Shark” featured the hunt for a whale-sized great white that has supposedly haunted the waters around Stewart Island, at New Zealand’s southern tip, for decades or centuries. When the narrator said that fishermen in the area “consider themselves lucky” to return home alive each evening, I lost my patience. I muted the TV and held my nose.

Alastair Bland also wrote for NPR last week on the phenomenon of Shark Week and its effect on demand for shark meat in restaurants.

Playlist: You Can Do It!

Aug 18, 2014   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on Playlist: You Can Do It!

These stories will inspire you to achieve your goals.i
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These stories will inspire you to achieve your goals.

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These stories will inspire you to achieve your goals.

These stories will inspire you to achieve your goals.

iStock

We made playlists of TED Radio Hour stories that will keep you curious about big ideas throughout the summer.

Need a little encouragement this summer? This playlist may inspire you to overcome your own obstacles with stories about conquering fears, getting past cultural boundaries and more.

More Military Families Are Relying On Food Banks And Pantries

Aug 18, 2014   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on More Military Families Are Relying On Food Banks And Pantries

Volunteers at the Maryland Food Bank in Baltimore sort and box food donations on a conveyor belt. The bank started working with groups like the USO in 2013 to provide food aid to families affiliated with nearby military bases.i
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Volunteers at the Maryland Food Bank in Baltimore sort and box food donations on a conveyor belt. The bank started working with groups like the USO in 2013 to provide food aid to families affiliated with nearby military bases.

Pam Fessler/NPR


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Volunteers at the Maryland Food Bank in Baltimore sort and box food donations on a conveyor belt. The bank started working with groups like the USO in 2013 to provide food aid to families affiliated with nearby military bases.

Volunteers at the Maryland Food Bank in Baltimore sort and box food donations on a conveyor belt. The bank started working with groups like the USO in 2013 to provide food aid to families affiliated with nearby military bases.

Pam Fessler/NPR

Despite the economic recovery, more than 46 million Americans — or one in seven — used a food pantry last year. And a surprisingly high number of those seeking help were households with military members, according to a new survey by Feeding America, which is a network of U.S. food banks.

The survey — conducted in 2013 — found that almost 620,000 of the households using Feeding America services have at least one member currently in the military. That’s one quarter of all U.S. military households.

Deborah Flateman, who’s president and CEO of the Maryland Food Bank in Baltimore, says she isn’t surprised. Last year, her food bank started working with groups like the USO to provide food aid to families affiliated with nearby military bases like Fort Meade.

She says, so far, they’ve used their mobile food pantry to distributed more than 200,000 pounds of food to military families.

About 20 percent of all the households using Feeding America services include a member who is serving or has served in the military. Of those 620,000 of the households have at least one member currently in the military — one quarter of all U.S. military households.

“They’re not unlike any of the other families that we serve,” says Flateman. “They meet hardship and they need assistance with food.”

And other food banks and pantries say they’re seeing a similar increase.

Margaret Young is with the Calvary Assembly of God Church in Dover, Del., about a mile from Dover Air Force Base. She says she noticed about four years ago that more military families were showing up at the church food pantry for help. She says they’re usually young, junior-level service members with kids.

“And then of course they have younger spouses,” says Young. “And the spouses, you know, when you have to relocate every couple of months or every couple of years, however that works, it makes it harder for them to find jobs. I think that’s the primary reason.”

Logan Kovach, 6, Matthew Kovach, 2, and Allyson Kovach, 5, eat a lunch distributed by the YMCA in Hopkins County, Kentucky.

A woman and her daughter shop at a Greenmarket in New York City using Electronic Benefits Transfer, or food stamps. Government data show that fewer people were receiving the benefits in February 2014 than at the peak in December 2012.

Maura Daly of Feeding America says that’s what they found in their survey: Both military and non-military families are having a difficult time making ends meet. She says even though most of their clients work, they often have to make difficult choices.

“Between things like food and paying for their utilities, food and paying for transportation, food and paying for medicine or housing,” she says. “So these are literally choices that people have to make between eating, putting a roof over their head, keeping the lights on.”

In a written statement, Pentagon spokesman Nate Christensen told NPR that the Defense Department is reviewing the survey results. But he also said that military pay and benefits compare favorably with the private sector, and if a service member has financial troubles, counseling is available.

But Joyce Raezer, executive director of the National Military Family Association, a nonprofit group that supports military families, says service members are often reluctant to seek such help. That’s especially the case now that the military is downsizing, she says.

“People are afraid to call attention to themselves. They don’t know who’s getting picked to be asked to leave and who’s going to get to stay and what the criteria are. And so a lot of these families are just laying low,” says Raezer.

And it can also be embarrassing to admit you need help with food. Raezer wasn’t at all surprised that we were unable to get any military families to go on record for this story.

“The reason they go to the food bank is it’s anonymous,” she says.

But Raezer has no doubt the need is there, even if the Feeding America numbers seem high to her. She says some families have trouble managing their finances, with all the disruptions of military life, and especially if there’s an unexpected bill for something like a car repair.

“Which may mean at the end of the month, things are a little tighter than they should be,” she says.

And free food at the pantry might be just what they need to get by.

Hamas Conflict Could Have Lingering Impact On Israel’s Economy

Aug 18, 2014   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Hamas Conflict Could Have Lingering Impact On Israel’s Economy

An Israeli Merkava tank drives past a field of sunflowers along the border between Israel and the Gaza Strip as they move out of the Gaza Strip on August 3, 2014.i
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An Israeli Merkava tank drives past a field of sunflowers along the border between Israel and the Gaza Strip as they move out of the Gaza Strip on August 3, 2014.

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An Israeli Merkava tank drives past a field of sunflowers along the border between Israel and the Gaza Strip as they move out of the Gaza Strip on August 3, 2014.

An Israeli Merkava tank drives past a field of sunflowers along the border between Israel and the Gaza Strip as they move out of the Gaza Strip on August 3, 2014.

Gil Cohen Magen /AFP/Getty Images

Itay Maoz climbs into his dusty SUV and presses a series of buttons on his cell phone, which opens an electronic gate surrounding the Nahal Oz Kibbutz. From here, in the far south of Israel, you can see across the border into Gaza at the remains of buildings pulverized by Israeli missiles.

This 2,500-acre collective farm was on the front line during the war between Israel and Hamas and it sustained millions of dollars worth of damage. Maoz points at patch of hard earth, gouged with deep tracks, leading toward Gaza.

“That used to be a road,” Maoz says. “Not anymore.” He says all the military tanks were crossing here, so there’s nothing left of the road.

Maoz says Israeli tanks and soldiers swarmed this area once the fighting with Hamas began. The tanks flattened the fields, destroying everything in their path, including the kibbutz’s sophisticated irrigation system, turning the area into a large dust bowl.

Fire consumes a field close to greenhouses on a farm in the Israeli Mediterranean coastal city of Ashkelon after a rocket fired by Palestinian militants from the Gaza Strip landed there.i
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Fire consumes a field close to greenhouses on a farm in the Israeli Mediterranean coastal city of Ashkelon after a rocket fired by Palestinian militants from the Gaza Strip landed there.

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Fire consumes a field close to greenhouses on a farm in the Israeli Mediterranean coastal city of Ashkelon after a rocket fired by Palestinian militants from the Gaza Strip landed there.

Fire consumes a field close to greenhouses on a farm in the Israeli Mediterranean coastal city of Ashkelon after a rocket fired by Palestinian militants from the Gaza Strip landed there.

Jack Guez /AFP/Getty Images

Residents were ordered not to go into the fields and Maoz says hundreds of acres of cabbages, wheat, melons and more were destroyed. He says the fruit in a nearby watermelon field should be green and blooming right now, but after six weeks without water, the watermelons are very small and rotting.

“That’s a total loss of the field; nothing we can do with this field,” Maoz says.

He says next year’s crop, and probably the year after, will also be affected. Maoz estimates the cost to be 6 to 7 million shekels, about $2 million U.S., and has appealed for government help. He says the kibbutz was adequately compensated after other wars with Hamas, but this one went on much longer.

Analysts say the war could cost the Israeli economy about $3 billion, if you include things like lost wages. Businesses, especially those in the south, suffered as customers stayed in their homes.

In the nearby city of Ashkelon, often a target of rocket fire from Gaza, the shopping malls were empty throughout much of the conflict. At an Office Depot shop, deputy manager Elena Smolanov says the parking lot was empty day after day.

“People didn’t leave their home, they were scared,” she says. “We were sitting here, basically five employees each shift, and just basically looking at each other.” Smolanov says customers are starting to trickle back, especially with the start of a new school year.

Related Stories

When boats come in to the Gaza city harbor, the fish are small and few. An Israeli blockade keeps Gazan boats within 3 nautical miles from shore, where there are few fish to catch.

Palestinians carry belongings from their homes, destroyed by Israeli airstrikes, in Beit Hanoun in the northern Gaza Strip on Sunday. The devastation could resume if a cease-fire is allowed to expire at midnight on Monday.

Displaced Palestinian Emada Al Attar, 23, holds her 16 day-old baby boy Anous in a classroom where they sleep in a U.N. school where the family is taking refuge during the war, in Gaza City, Gaza Strip on Aug. 8.

One of the hardest hit sectors was tourism. The number of foreign tourists arriving plummeted more than 25 percent. The Israeli government was outraged when the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration suspended American flights to Israel after a rocket landed near Tel Aviv’s Ben Gurion airport. Some Asian and European airlines continue to stay away.

A new radio and TV campaign is trying to reverse the decline in tourism locally and from overseas. While Israeli spokesmen highlighted the rocket threat during the war, tourism minister Uzi Landau is now stressing a different view.

“In fact, the true story in the country is different,” Landau says. “When you come to the place, you do see in all of our cities, apart of those areas which are close to Gaza, lines go on almost as if it were routine.”

Yacov Sheinin, director of the consultancy firm Economic Models, says Israel’s economy, which has been averaging more than 3 percent growth per year, will rebound from this, as it has after other conflicts. He says robust sectors, like high tech, will continue to attract foreign investors.

“If they’re coming to high tech, they will come, they’re coming,” Sheinin says. “[But] not as much as we could get if there would be peace.” Sheinin says foreign investors will come because they know about the cost and the risk.

The one area that will see perhaps the largest growth is defense. Israel’s defense ministry is asking for a more than $3 billion hike for next year, something Israel’s finance ministry calls “excessive.”

Kenya Shuts Borders To Ebola-Hit West African Countries

Aug 17, 2014   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on Kenya Shuts Borders To Ebola-Hit West African Countries

Health workers are handed personal protective gear before collecting the bodies of the deceased from streets in Monrovia, Liberia, on Saturday. Liberia is one of three West African countries hard-hit by the Ebola outbreak.i
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Health workers are handed personal protective gear before collecting the bodies of the deceased from streets in Monrovia, Liberia, on Saturday. Liberia is one of three West African countries hard-hit by the Ebola outbreak.

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Health workers are handed personal protective gear before collecting the bodies of the deceased from streets in Monrovia, Liberia, on Saturday. Liberia is one of three West African countries hard-hit by the Ebola outbreak.

Health workers are handed personal protective gear before collecting the bodies of the deceased from streets in Monrovia, Liberia, on Saturday. Liberia is one of three West African countries hard-hit by the Ebola outbreak.

Abbas Dulleh/AP

The Kenyan government has taken the step of closing its borders to travelers from West African countries affected by the growing Ebola outbreak.

The suspension applies to Kenyan ports of entry for people traveling from Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia, the country’s Health Ministry says. It goes into effect from Tuesday midnight.

“This step is in line with the recognition of the extraordinary measures urgently required to contain the Ebola outbreak in West Africa,” the Health Ministry said in a statement.

The BBC reports that after announcing the decision, Kenyan Health Minister James Macharia said it was “in the interest of public health” and warned Kenyans and health workers who had returned from the banned countries to undergo strict checks and quarantine if necessary.

The World Health Organization has said that because of Kenya’s status as a major transport hub in Africa, the country is at “high risk” from Ebola. Earlier, Kenyan officials feared that four cases of Ebola had entered the country, but tests later proved negative. The U.N. agency said that as of Friday, 1,145 people had died from Ebola of 2,127 total known cases.

After the announcement, national carrier Kenyan Airways said it was halting flights to Liberia and Sierra Leone.

The Associated Press says:

“The airline said flights actually help to contain the Ebola outbreak by transporting medical staff, supplies and equipment to West Africa.

“But doctors representing the Kenya Medical Association had asked Kenya Airways to suspend flights to the four countries affected by Ebola ‘until things stabilize.’ “

Other countries and individual airlines have taken similar steps in recent days. Major carriers British Airways and Emirates Airlines have suspended flights to Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia.

The AP says:

“Nigeria became the fourth Ebola-affected country late last month after a Liberian-American man sick with the disease flew to Lagos on an ASKY flight and infected several people before he died.

“Officials in Cameroon, which borders Nigeria, announced Friday it would suspend all flights from all four Ebola-affected countries. Korean Air announced on Thursday it would temporarily halt its service to Kenya despite the fact there are no cases of Ebola in the country.”

Kurds: U.S. Airpower Backing Operation To Retake Mosul Dam

Aug 17, 2014   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on Kurds: U.S. Airpower Backing Operation To Retake Mosul Dam

Map of northern Iraq locating Mosul dam and the Kurdish capital Arbil (Irbil), where the U.S. carried out airstrikes targeting Islamic State (IS) fighters on Saturday.i
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Map of northern Iraq locating Mosul dam and the Kurdish capital Arbil (Irbil), where the U.S. carried out airstrikes targeting Islamic State (IS) fighters on Saturday.

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Map of northern Iraq locating Mosul dam and the Kurdish capital Arbil (Irbil), where the U.S. carried out airstrikes targeting Islamic State (IS) fighters on Saturday.

Map of northern Iraq locating Mosul dam and the Kurdish capital Arbil (Irbil), where the U.S. carried out airstrikes targeting Islamic State (IS) fighters on Saturday.

Reuters/Landov

Kurdish forces say they’ve retaken areas near the country’s largest dam in Mosul from Islamic separatists, a day after U.S. officials acknowledged conducting airstrikes in the region.

The Associated Press, quoting Kurdish peshmerga leader Gen. Tawfik Desty, said his fighters, backed by Iraqi and U.S. warplanes, started an operation to retake Mosul Dam from Islamic State, or ISIS, rebels early Sunday.

“Desty, a commander with the Kurdish forces at the dam, which was seized on Aug. 7, said they now control the eastern part of the dam and that fighting is still underway,” the AP says.

As we reported on Saturday, U.S. carrier-based F/A-18s and drones were conducting strikes near the dam on the Tigris River in northern Iraq, which has seen stepped up fighting between IS militants and pesherga forces.

Ghassan Salim, 29, a lawyer who lives near the dam, told NPR by telephone that the U.S. airstrikes came from the east and west targeting an area about three miles from the dam. They lasted into Sunday morning. But he said he witnessed no clear progress by Kurdish forces on the ground as yet.

First Listen: Cameron Carpenter, ‘If You Could Read My Mind’

Aug 17, 2014   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on First Listen: Cameron Carpenter, ‘If You Could Read My Mind’


Cameron Carpenter's new album, If You Could Read My Mind, comes out Aug. 26.

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Cameron Carpenter’s new album, If You Could Read My Mind, comes out Aug. 26.

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Cameron Carpenter's new album, If You Could Read My Mind, comes out Aug. 26.

Cameron Carpenter’s new album, If You Could Read My Mind, comes out Aug. 26.

Thomas Grube/Courtesy of the artist

Don’t let the spandex pants, bejeweled shoes and modified mohawk fool you: Cameron Carpenter is a serious musician. He’s a modern-day throwback to the flamboyant virtuosos of the 19th century. Like Liszt or Paganini, Carpenter dazzles audiences with blazing technique, igniting enthusiasm for his music and his instrument. Oh, and did I mention he’s an organist?

Skeptics who equate the instrument with fusty church traditions might convert to organ believers after hearing Carpenter’s new album, If You Could Read My Mind. It is a joy and a wonder at nearly every turn — and there are many. From Bach to Burt Bacharach, with Gordon Lightfoot, Leonard Cohen and Marcel Dupré in the mix, Carpenter’s cornucopia approach to programming plays at pop sensibilities while indulging organ die-hards.

Although he plays on standard pipe organs, Carpenter prefers their digital descendants, such as the new International Touring Organ displayed on this album. After nearly 10 years in the making, and with a price tag of more than $1 million, Carpenter has designed his dream instrument: a pipeless powerhouse that incorporates digitized sounds collected from instruments around the world. It combines, as he describes it, the “emotional magnitude” of the acoustic cathedral organ with the “clarity and audacity” of the cinema organ (think “mighty Wurlitzer”).

One of Carpenter’s greatest gifts is his quirky, kaleidoscopic registration — the technique of pulling combinations of organ stops (levers) to achieve particular colors and sounds. (It’s where the phrase “pulling out all the stops” comes from.) Carpenter now has the world, it seems, at his fingertips. The multicolored chirps, burps and bells deployed in Bernstein‘s Candide Overture would be welcome in Willy Wonka’s factory, while Carpenter’s arrangement of the song “Pure Imagination,” from the first Wonka film, conjures vats of bubbling chocolate through jazzy pedaling deep in the bass.

For organ purists, there’s Dupré’s Variations sur un Noël, with its colossal chords and turbulent fugue. For pop mavens, there’s a sepulchral take on Cohen’s “Sisters of Mercy” countered by Patsy Cline‘s “Back in Baby’s Arms,” complete with bass drum and cymbals. To hear the instrument scaled back and articulate, try Bach’s Organ Sonata No. 6. For the opposite effect, Carpenter’s own Music for an Imaginary Film exploits the instrument’s vast possibilities. Astor Piazzolla‘s Oblivion is rendered sultry, with a reedy bandoneon wheezing in the upper register.

If we really could read Carpenter’s mind, we’d understand the reasons behind his loopy deconstruction of the Lightfoot hit that lends the album its title. Bathed in delicately pealing bells at the outset, the piece pivots frenetically to calliope riffs, closing in a blaze of trumpet fanfares and pyrotechnics.

On the other hand, perhaps we know more about Carpenter than we think. It’s all here: pure imagination, presiding over a magical instrument with uncommon mastery.

Protesters And Police Clash In Ferguson, Mo.

Aug 17, 2014   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Protesters And Police Clash In Ferguson, Mo.

People protest the police shooting death of Michael Brown a week ago in Ferguson, Mo., on Saturday before a midnight curfew took effect.i
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People protest the police shooting death of Michael Brown a week ago in Ferguson, Mo., on Saturday before a midnight curfew took effect.

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People protest the police shooting death of Michael Brown a week ago in Ferguson, Mo., on Saturday before a midnight curfew took effect.

People protest the police shooting death of Michael Brown a week ago in Ferguson, Mo., on Saturday before a midnight curfew took effect.

Charlie Riedel/AP

Authorities say one person was shot and critically wounded and seven people were arrested as police used smoke and tear gas to impose a curfew in a St. Louis suburb where a black teen walking down the street had been shot by a white police officer.

Missouri State Highway Patrol Capt. Ron Johnson says his department’s strong response early Sunday morning came after a midnight to 5 a.m. curfew took hold in Ferguson, and was precipitated by two events.

Johnson says concerns about people who’d broken into a barbecue restaurant and taken position on the roof overlooking approaching police was one concern. He says another concern involved a man flashing a handgun appeared in the middle of the street as armored vehicles approached.

Johnson says someone also fired at a patrol car, but no officers were injured.

A protester holds up a clenched fist Friday night in front of a convenience store that was looted and burned in Ferguson, Mo.

Eighteen-year-old Michael Brown was shot Aug. 9, prompting protests, unrest and claims of civil rights violations.

A protester holds up a clenched fist in front of a convenience store that was looted and burned following the shooting death of Michael Brown by police nearly a week ago in Ferguson, Mo.

Police in riot gear stand watch Saturday in Ferguson before the curfew took effect.i
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Police in riot gear stand watch Saturday in Ferguson before the curfew took effect.

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Police in riot gear stand watch Saturday in Ferguson before the curfew took effect.

Police in riot gear stand watch Saturday in Ferguson before the curfew took effect.

Charlie Riedel/AP

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