Browsing articles from "August, 2014"

Corvette-Eating Sinkhole Will Be Filled In, Museum Says

Aug 31, 2014   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on Corvette-Eating Sinkhole Will Be Filled In, Museum Says

A glimpse of what it's like in the sinkhole that opened up Wednesday under a wing of the National Corvette Museum in Bowling Green, Ky.i
i

A glimpse of what it's like in the sinkhole that opened up Wednesday under a wing of the National Corvette Museum in Bowling Green, Ky.

A glimpse of what it’s like in the sinkhole that opened up Wednesday under a wing of the National Corvette Museum in Bowling Green, Ky.



National Corvette Museum

The sinkhole that swallowed up eight cars at the National Corvette Museum in Bowling Green, Kent., in February quickly became a favorite exhibit for museum visitors, but that’s not enough to head off a decision to fill in the 60-foot wide, 40-foot-deep orifice in the floor.

Reuters reports:

“The board had voted in June to attempt to keep part of the hole open, but the cost of retaining walls and other construction would exceed $1 million, officials at the museum in Bowling Green, Kentucky, said in a statement.

“‘We really wanted to preserve a portion of the hole so that guests for years to come could see a little bit of what it was like,’ museum executive director Wendell Strode said in the statement. ‘But after receiving more detailed pricing, the cost outweighs the benefit.'”

As we reported after the Feb. 12 incident, which was witnessed by security cameras, the floor suddenly opened up and consumed six Corvettes owned by the museum, ranging in vintage from 1962 to 2009 and including two GM ZR-1s on loan from General Motors.

Coast Guard Calls Off Search For Small Plane That Crashed In Ocean

Aug 31, 2014   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on Coast Guard Calls Off Search For Small Plane That Crashed In Ocean

A Cirrus SR22 similar to this one ran out of fuel and crashed into the Atlantic after its pilot apparently fell unconscious.i
i

A Cirrus SR22 similar to this one ran out of fuel and crashed into the Atlantic after its pilot apparently fell unconscious.

PR NEWSWIRE


hide caption

itoggle caption

PR NEWSWIRE

A Cirrus SR22 similar to this one ran out of fuel and crashed into the Atlantic after its pilot apparently fell unconscious.

A Cirrus SR22 similar to this one ran out of fuel and crashed into the Atlantic after its pilot apparently fell unconscious.

PR NEWSWIRE

The Coast Guard says it has called off a search for the pilot of a single-engine prop plane that drifted into restricted airspace over Washington, D.C., forcing fighter jets to scramble an intercept. The apparently unconscious pilot of the small aircraft later ran out of fuel and plunged into the Atlantic Ocean.

On Saturday, a pair of F-16s were dispatched to escort the Cirrus SR22. When the fighters approached, one of the F-16 pilots observed a person at the controls of the propeller-driven plane who appeared to be unconscious.

In a statement reported by Reuters, the Coast Guard said the F-16s “stayed with the plane as it continued past the coast of Virginia, ran out of fuel and crashed into the Atlantic Ocean.”

The Coast Guard launched an MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter crew and an HC-130 Hercules airplane crew from Air Station Elizabeth City, N.C., and the crew of Cutter Beluga, based in Virginia Beach, to respond, USA Today says.

On Sunday morning, the Coast Guard said it had halted the search “after a civilian boater recovered a wheel and engine cowling from the single-engine Cirrus. [Coast Guard Petty Officer Nate] Littlejohn said the chances of finding anything else were slim,” the newspaper says.

The pilot’s name has not been released pending notification of next of kin.

How ‘Sassy’ Came To Mean Something Both Sweet And Sour

Aug 31, 2014   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on How ‘Sassy’ Came To Mean Something Both Sweet And Sour

Jazz singer and pianist Sarah Vaughan reportedly earned the nickname Sassy, from pianist John Malachi. Apparently she liked it.i
i

Jazz singer and pianist Sarah Vaughan reportedly earned the nickname “Sassy,” from pianist John Malachi. Apparently she liked it.

AFP/Getty Images


hide caption

itoggle caption

AFP/Getty Images

Jazz singer and pianist Sarah Vaughan reportedly earned the nickname Sassy, from pianist John Malachi. Apparently she liked it.

Jazz singer and pianist Sarah Vaughan reportedly earned the nickname “Sassy,” from pianist John Malachi. Apparently she liked it.

AFP/Getty Images

In our semi-regular Word Watch feature, we take a look at a word or phrase that’s caught our attention, whether for its history, usage, etymology, or just because it has an interesting story.

I’m sometimes described as “sassy,” and when that happens I choose to take it as a compliment. I always think of Sarah “Sassy” Vaughan’s spirit, verve and “sass.”

You see, “sassy” started out as “saucy,” according to the Oxford English Dictionary, which defines it as:

  • “Impudent, saucy, ‘cheeky.'”
  • “Outspoken, provocative.”
  • “Conceited, pretentious.”
  • “Self-assured, spirited, bold.”
  • “Vigorous, lively.”
  • “Stylish, ‘chic’.”

I always assume the part that begins with “self-assured” and ends with “chic” is what people are saying about me. ::blinks innocently::

But, let’s talk about the part that begins with “impudent” and ends with “pretentious.” Why? Because the new Lifetime show Girlfriend Intervention, that’s why. Linda Holmes explained that whole business over on the Monkey See blog better than I could ever do it, so I won’t even bother here, but this new makeover series has resurrected the tired old cliche of the “sassy black woman.”

What “sassy black woman” cliche, you may ask? The sometimes-loud-sometimes-rude-always-quick-with-the-comeback-sass-mouth-neck-rolling-finger-wagging-one-who-tells-it-like-it-is-with-no-sugarcoating cliche. Like this one:

The one tvtropes.org describes like this:

Yup. THAT “sassy black woman” cliche. So I decided to subject “sassy” to some scrutiny.

Ben Zimmer, executive producer of vocabulary.com and language columnist for The Wall Street Journal, tried to help me trace “sassy” back to the big bang moment when it split from “saucy” and we couldn’t quite pin it down. But he did point me toward To Make Our World Anew: Volume I: A History of African Americans. In it, Peter H. Wood suggests that the West African word “sasi” may have influenced the development of the word:

In the Mende language of West Africa, sasi could mean “a prideful boaster” or “to ridicule contemptuously.” In the Gullah speech of the South Carolina low country, therefore, sasi continued to mean “proud one” or “to ridicule,” but this matched so closely the common English term “saucy” that it probably reinforced the use of “sassy” and “to sass” in American English.

From its mainly negative origins, “sassy” has grown to develop the taste of something positive — spirited, confident and lively — while still carrying the whiff of the negative — loud, rude, belligerent. Today — even before Lifetime staged its Girlfriend Intervention — folks were making primers on How to Be Sassy.

TVTropes.org explains how these shifts have played out in pop culture, particularly as applied to black women:

These characters usually make good leaders, because though generally fun, insightful, they are still firm in decisions, trustworthy, and speak their minds. Also like the Spicy Latina, the character will usually be sexually liberated and have no qualms acting in a sexual manner, though usually in a less pronounced manner. The positive version is now portrayed a lot more than the negative version, mainly because of the Unfortunate Implications, that portraying black women in only this way had. It’s also rather common for the positive variant to be the Only Sane Woman of a group, in which case her “sass” will be more like “exasperated sarcasm.

Now, “sassy” has escaped from its Southern, African-American connotations, and a related cliche situation has developed: “Sassy Gay Friend.” (Language warning!)

Which leads me to wonder: why is “sassy” only used to describe men in instances like this, when it’s a caricature or gay stereotype? Can a stereotypically masculine man be “sassy”? And lastly, can we please bring “saucy” back?

(C’mon!! You know I had to do it!!)

Tanya Ballard Brown — the saucy minx — is an editor for NPR.org who often sings Michael Jackson songs at her desk. Loudly. You can reach out to her on Facebook, Google+, Tumblr and Twitter.

Putin Calls For Talks To Consider Statehood For Southeastern Ukraine

Aug 31, 2014   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Putin Calls For Talks To Consider Statehood For Southeastern Ukraine

Russian President Vladimir Putin holds a terrestrial globe presented him as a gift in Tver region, Russia, on Friday.i
i

Russian President Vladimir Putin holds a terrestrial globe presented him as a gift in Tver region, Russia, on Friday.

Mikhail Klimentyev/AP


hide caption

itoggle caption

Mikhail Klimentyev/AP

Russian President Vladimir Putin holds a terrestrial globe presented him as a gift in Tver region, Russia, on Friday.

Russian President Vladimir Putin holds a terrestrial globe presented him as a gift in Tver region, Russia, on Friday.

Mikhail Klimentyev/AP

Russian President Vladimir Putin has called for “meaningful talks” to end the separatist conflict in eastern Ukraine, reiterating that the Kremlin, which is said to have allowed thousands of its soldiers to join the rebels, views the situation as an internal dispute.

“Substantive, meaningful talks should begin immediately … related to the issues of society’s political organization and statehood in southeastern Ukraine to protect legitimate interests of people living there,” Tass quoted Putin as saying.

Over the weekend, separatists, with the apparent backing of Russian soldiers, captured the city of Novoazovsk in the southern Donetsk region on the coast of the Sea of Azov. As NPR’s Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson reports, the move has prompted fears that the city of Mariupol, just west of Novoazovsk, is next in line.

Reuters reports:

“Asked later about Putin’s remarks, his spokesman Dmitry Peskov told reporters in the Russian city of Chelyabinsk: “This is not a conflict between Russia and Ukraine, this is a domestic Ukrainian conflict.”

“Pressed on whether Moscow felt that ‘Novorossiya’ – [or ‘New Russia,’] the name the rebels give to the widely Russian-speaking region in dispute – should remain part of Ukraine, Peskov said: ‘Of course.’

“‘Only Ukraine can reach an agreement with Novorossiya, taking into account the interests of Novorossiya, and this is the only way to reach political settlement,’ Peskov said.”

The remarks follow an announcement of new European Union sanctions on Russia over its military involvement in Ukraine. The EU said the sanctions, designed to hit a number of sectors of the Russian economy, would go into effect within a week unless Moscow “[withdraws] all its military assets and forces from Ukraine,” the European Council said.

Ukraine’s President Petro Poroshenko also said Saturday that his nation is “close to the point of no return,” and that the next step might be “full-scale war.”

“We have thousands of foreign troops and hundreds of foreign tanks now on the territory of Ukraine with a very high risk not only for the peace and stability of Ukraine, but the whole peace and stability of Europe,” Poroshenko said in Brussels.

Despite Moscow’s denials, NATO, citing surveillance and intelligence reports, says there are at least 1,000 Russian soldiers fighting here and the Ukrainians report armored columns coming across the border.

NPR’s Sarhaddi Nelson, reporting Mariupol, says both the separatists and Kiev’s forces are getting ready for an anticipated assault on the strategic port. It’s fall would bring the separatists one step closer to a corridor stretching from Russian territory to the Moscow’s newly annexed Crimean peninsula.

Ukrainian forces and residents are working side-by-side to beef up Mariupol’s defenses — Laying mines, digging trenches and erecting concrete barriers. Two armed battalions paid for by two powerful Ukrainian oligarchs will fight alongside their country’s military to repel the advancing rebels, Soraya says.

As for the question of Russian involvement, she says, it’s clear someone is supplying the rebels:

“The fighters are wearing new military-grade camouflage uniforms and boots. Some carry high-grade Kalashnikovs used by professional soldiers. At least one checkpoint guard has a Russian accent. And a tank we saw looked a lot like a T-72, which the Russians use.”

She spoke to a rebel battalion commander who calls himself “Svat” and says he’s a lieutenant colonel with the Ukrainian army reserves.

“Svat is confident his men will take Mariupol because they are better fighters and have a higher morale,” she says. “He adds they are prepared to go all the way to the western Ukrainian city of Lviv to create Novorossiya, or New Russia.”

U.N. Peacekeepers Rescued After Being Trapped By Syrian Militants

Aug 30, 2014   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on U.N. Peacekeepers Rescued After Being Trapped By Syrian Militants

Smoke rises near a Syrian flag hoisted up a flagpole as a result of the fighting between Syrian rebels and the Syrian Army over the control of Quneitra crossing, on Saturday. The area is where  dozens of U.N. peacekeepers had been under siege by Nusra Front fighters.i
i

Smoke rises near a Syrian flag hoisted up a flagpole as a result of the fighting between Syrian rebels and the Syrian Army over the control of Quneitra crossing, on Saturday. The area is where dozens of U.N. peacekeepers had been under siege by Nusra Front fighters.

Atef Safadi/EPA/Landov


hide caption

itoggle caption

Atef Safadi/EPA/Landov

Smoke rises near a Syrian flag hoisted up a flagpole as a result of the fighting between Syrian rebels and the Syrian Army over the control of Quneitra crossing, on Saturday. The area is where  dozens of U.N. peacekeepers had been under siege by Nusra Front fighters.

Smoke rises near a Syrian flag hoisted up a flagpole as a result of the fighting between Syrian rebels and the Syrian Army over the control of Quneitra crossing, on Saturday. The area is where dozens of U.N. peacekeepers had been under siege by Nusra Front fighters.

Atef Safadi/EPA/Landov

Dozens of besieged United Nations peacekeepers were safely extracted after being surrounded for days on the Syrian side of the Golan Heights.

After rebels of the al-Qaida-affiliated Nusra Front seized 44 Fijian peacekeepers on Thursday, they laid siege to two encampments of Filipino peacekeepers totaling more than 70 soldiers.

The rebels demanded the Filipino soldiers, part of the U.N. mission known as UNDOF, surrender their weapons, but the peacekeepers refused.

“There was a firefight but I would like to assure everyone that our troops are safe at the moment,” said Ramon Zagala, chief of the Philippines Armed Forces public affairs office. He did not give any more details.

“The U.N. peacekeepers returned fire and prevented the attackers from entering the position,” a U.N. statement said. It said there were no reported casualties among the U.N. personnel.

It wasn’t immediately clear which U.N. peacekeepers were involved in the firefight with Nusra Front fighters.

The Associated Press reports: “The gunbattle began early Saturday at the Rwihana base some 1.5 miles (2.3 kilometers) from Quneitra, where 40 Filipino peacekeepers were surrounded by Nusra fighters who were ordering them to surrender, said Rami Abdurrahman of the Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights. The Philippines’ Defense Secretary Voltaire Gazmin gave a similar account but did not name the armed group.”

The Irish Times quotes an unnamed military official as saying an Irish U.N. peacekeeping battalion, which is tasked with emergency responses, evacuated all the Filipino peacekeepers on Saturday morning.

The U.N. said in a statement that that the Fijian peacekeepers are, according to reliable sources, “safe and in good health.”

UNDOF, with peacekeepers from Fiji, India, Ireland, Nepal, Netherlands and the Philippines, has monitored the disengagement zone between Israel and Syria since 1974 in the wake of the 1973 Arab-Israeli war, Reuters says.

South Africa Condemns Apparent Coup In Lesotho

Aug 30, 2014   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on South Africa Condemns Apparent Coup In Lesotho

A member of the Lesotho military looks on as he stands guard in front of an armed personnel carrier at the entrance of the army barracks in the capital Maseru on Saturday. Lesotho's Prime Minister Thomas Thabane has accused the army of staging a coup.i
i

A member of the Lesotho military looks on as he stands guard in front of an armed personnel carrier at the entrance of the army barracks in the capital Maseru on Saturday. Lesotho’s Prime Minister Thomas Thabane has accused the army of staging a coup.

Siphiwe Sibeko/Reuters/Landov


hide caption

itoggle caption

Siphiwe Sibeko/Reuters/Landov

A member of the Lesotho military looks on as he stands guard in front of an armed personnel carrier at the entrance of the army barracks in the capital Maseru on Saturday. Lesotho's Prime Minister Thomas Thabane has accused the army of staging a coup.

A member of the Lesotho military looks on as he stands guard in front of an armed personnel carrier at the entrance of the army barracks in the capital Maseru on Saturday. Lesotho’s Prime Minister Thomas Thabane has accused the army of staging a coup.

Siphiwe Sibeko/Reuters/Landov

South Africa has condemned an apparent coup in Lesotho, an independent kingdom within its borders where the army appears to have seized power, driving out the prime minister. Lesotho’s defense forces, however, have denied a takeover.

Lesotho’s military seized two police stations Saturday as gunfire rang out in the capital of the mountainous kingdom. The military justified the move by saying that police planned to arm factions at an upcoming demonstration in the capital, Maseru. An army spokesman denied a coup and said the army had returned to the barracks.

The Associated Press reports:

“Political tensions have been high in the tiny kingdom … since June when there was a power struggle after Prime Minister Thomas Thabane suspended parliament to dodge a vote of no confidence.”

“Early Saturday, Prime Minister Thomas Thabane was forced to flee across the South African border to escape the violence.”

“By all accounts the actions of the Lesotho defense force bear the hallmarks of a coup d’etat,” South African Foreign Ministry Spokesman Clayson Monyela told reporters.

“We are calling on the commander of the armed forces to return to the barracks and allow the democratically elected government to return to its business,” Monyela said.

“The situation in Lesotho is still unfolding. No one has claimed to take over government … so we are monitoring that … our interest is to see it resolved through peaceful means,” Monyela was quoted by the AP as saying.

The news agency reports: “Thabane told South Africa’s eNCA television that the military actions amounted to a coup. He said he did not give permission for the action and that something like this should not be happening in a democratic state. He is going to meet with South African officials, and expects South Africa to help his government restore law and order, he said.”

Kiev Calls For Response To Russia As Town Falls To Rebels

Aug 30, 2014   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Kiev Calls For Response To Russia As Town Falls To Rebels

President of Ukraine Petro Poroshenko (left) and EU Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso during a news conference after a meeting at the EU Commission headquarters in Brussels on Saturday to discuss the crisis in eastern Ukraine.i
i

President of Ukraine Petro Poroshenko (left) and EU Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso during a news conference after a meeting at the EU Commission headquarters in Brussels on Saturday to discuss the crisis in eastern Ukraine.

Julien Warnand/EPA/Landov


hide caption

itoggle caption

Julien Warnand/EPA/Landov

President of Ukraine Petro Poroshenko (left) and EU Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso during a news conference after a meeting at the EU Commission headquarters in Brussels on Saturday to discuss the crisis in eastern Ukraine.

President of Ukraine Petro Poroshenko (left) and EU Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso during a news conference after a meeting at the EU Commission headquarters in Brussels on Saturday to discuss the crisis in eastern Ukraine.

Julien Warnand/EPA/Landov

The European Union is reportedly hammering out further sanctions to punish Russia for its incursion into eastern Ukraine, with foreign ministers expressing “deep concern” over Moscow’s “aggression.”

NATO has also called on the Kremlin to halt its “illegal military operations” in eastern Ukraine.

Meanwhile, pro-Russia separatists, which reportedly include regular Russian army troops in their ranks, have captured the Ukrainian city of Novoazovsk in southern Donetsk province on the coast of the Sea of Azov.

NPR’s Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson, who visited Novoazovsk shortly after its capture, tells Weekend Edition Saturday that the city seems calm, but that residents are nervously reticent.

In an hour-long visit that was controlled by separatists, Soraya says she spoke to a city administration worker.

“She was rather frightened and it took me awhile to even get her to give me her first name,” Soraya says. “I asked her if she was happy that she’d been liberated and she wouldn’t answer.”

The capture of the city, now part of what the separatists call “the new Russia,” came after three days of fighting, according to residents.

Soraya tells WESAT host Scott Simon that it’s difficult or impossible to tell whether Russian forces are mixed in with the rebels, as the U.S. and European nations claim.

“[There] seems to be a mix of people here, definitely not locals who are here,” she says. “But the separatists claim they do not have any Russians fighting among them, that these are Ukrainians fighters who are here … that all the weapons and tanks here, and we’ve seen three tanks here, have been confiscated from the Ukrainians.”

According to the AP: “None of the half-dozen tanks seen by Associated Press reporters in the town of about 12,000 people bore Russian markings, but the packaging on [the fighters’] field rations said they were issued by the Russian army.”

NATO Secretary-General Anders Fogh Rasmussen on Friday referred to Russia’s “hollow denials” that its troops and equipment had illegally crossed the border into Ukraine. “This is a blatant violation of Ukraine’s sovereignty and territorial integrity. It defies all diplomatic efforts for a peaceful solution,” he said. Earlier this week, President Obama said there is “no doubt that this is not a homegrown, indigenous uprising.”

As EU foreign ministers met, Ukraine’s President Petro Poroshenko, who was invited to speak, appealed for them to give an “appropriate response” over Russian forces being brought into Ukraine, his spokesman said in a Twitter post, according to Reuters.

“Referring to meetings in Brussels between Poroshenko and EU leaders on Saturday, the spokesman said: ‘Poroshenko expressed the hope that the leaders of EU members will give an appropriate response to the act of aggression towards Ukraine.

“‘The bringing of Russian forces onto Ukrainian territory requires an appropriate response from the EU.'”

The high-level discussions came amid reports that a Ukrainian Su-25 had been shot down. Soraya reports: “This has been the third jet that in recent days has been shot down. This time, the Ukrainians say it was some sort of Russian missile launcher that brought it down. There has been no response from the Russian side.”

Fresh Air Weekend: Dave And Phil Alvin, Adam Rogers And Benjamin Booker

Aug 30, 2014   //   by Administrator   //   News from US  //  Comments Off on Fresh Air Weekend: Dave And Phil Alvin, Adam Rogers And Benjamin Booker

Lots of bottles of various alcoholic drinks.i
i

Lots of bottles of various alcoholic drinks.

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors, and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

In Big Bill Broonzy’s Blues, Brothers Find A Way To Sing Together: Dave and Phil Alvin have made their first full album together in nearly 30 years, a tribute to one of their early influences. “His persona was so big to me,” Phil Alvin tells Fresh Air‘s Terry Gross.

Seeking Proof For Why We Feel Terrible After Too Many Drinks: Author Adam Rogers says there are lots of myths about what causes hangovers. His new book, Proof: The Science of Booze, explores these and other scientific mysteries of alcohol’s effect on the body.

Benjamin Booker Is Raw, Yet Disciplined On Debut Album: The 25-year-old guitarist-singer-songwriter has already served as an opening act on Jack White’s recent tour, and he may be ready for headliner status.

You can listen to the original interviews here:

In Big Bill Broonzy’s Blues, Brothers Find A Way To Sing Together

Seeking Proof For Why We Feel Terrible After Too Many Drinks

Benjamin Booker Is Raw, Yet Disciplined On Debut Album

The Co-Discoverer Of Ebola Never Imagined An Outbreak Like This

Aug 29, 2014   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on The Co-Discoverer Of Ebola Never Imagined An Outbreak Like This

Peter Piot was one of the co-discoverers of the Ebola virus in 1976. I never thought we would see such a devastating and vast epidemic, he says.i
i

Peter Piot was one of the co-discoverers of the Ebola virus in 1976. “I never thought we would see such a devastating and vast epidemic,” he says.

Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images


hide caption

itoggle caption

Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images

Peter Piot was one of the co-discoverers of the Ebola virus in 1976. I never thought we would see such a devastating and vast epidemic, he says.

Peter Piot was one of the co-discoverers of the Ebola virus in 1976. “I never thought we would see such a devastating and vast epidemic,” he says.

Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images

As a young scientist in Belgium, Peter Piot was part of a team that discovered the Ebola virus in 1976.

He took his first trip to Africa to investigate this mysterious disease. In the Democratic Republic of Congo, he met people who had contracted it. “I’ll never forget the glazed eyes, the staring and the pain … this type of expression in the eyes … telling me I’m going to die,” says Piot. “That I’ll never forget.”

Piot went on to study AIDs in the 1980s and became founding executive director of the Jointed United nations Program on HIV/AIDS. He is now director of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

In an interview with NPR’s Melissa Block, Piot tells the story of Ebola’s discovery: He and his colleagues were looking at samples from a Belgian nun who had died of a disease in Congo. The question he thought he was trying to answer: Was it yellow fever?

‘);

var $visualizer = $audioElm.find(‘.audio-visualizer’);
var bar = ‘‘;

for (var i = 0; i 100) {
// safeguard
positionSought = duration – 10;
}

return positionSought;
};

scrubber();

$(window).resize(function(){
$bucket.find(‘.scrubber’).off(‘mouseup mousemove mousedown drag dragend’);
scrubber();
});
}

var setState = function(state){
$playButton.data(‘status’, state);
switch(state){
case “play”:
$bucket.addClass(“playing”);
$bucket.removeClass(“isLoading isPaused”);

updatedBackToTop(‘play’);
break;
case “pause”:
$bucket.removeClass(“playing isLoading”);
$bucket.addClass(“isPaused”);

updatedBackToTop(‘pause’);
break;
case “buffer”:
$bucket.addClass(“isLoading”);
$bucket.removeClass(“isPaused”);

updatedBackToTop(‘buffer’);
break;
case “stop”:
$bucket.removeClass(“playing isLoading isPaused”);

updatedBackToTop(‘stop’);
break;
}
}

var send_play_metric = function()
{
try
{
NPR.metrics.event({
‘network’ : ‘NPR Site’,
‘category’: ‘Secondary Audio’,
‘action’: ‘Play Audio’,
‘label’: audioUrl
});
}
catch(e)
{
NPR.messaging.exception(e, ‘NPR.metrics.StreamingAudio’, NPR.messaging.constants.METRICS_ERROR);
}
}

var send_pause_metric = function()
{
try
{
NPR.metrics.event({
‘network’ : ‘NPR Site’,
‘category’: ‘Secondary Audio’,
‘action’: ‘Pause Audio’,
‘label’: audioUrl
});
}
catch(e)
{
NPR.messaging.exception(e, ‘NPR.metrics.StreamingAudio’, NPR.messaging.constants.METRICS_ERROR);
}
}

var updatedBackToTop = function(state) {

var $backToTop = $(‘#back-to-top’);
if($backToTop.length !== 0) {
if(state === ‘play’) {
$backToTop.addClass(‘media-playing’);
} else {
$backToTop.removeClass(‘media-playing’);
}
}
}

$playButton.on(‘mouseup’, function(e){
e.preventDefault();
// the “case” values correspond to the player at time of button click – the player’s current state, not the state the user is engaging.

switch($(this).data(“status”)) {

case “play”:
send_pause_metric();
playerInstance.pause();
setState.apply(this, [“pause”]);
break;
case “pause”:

send_play_metric();
playerInstance.play();

if(!$bucket.hasClass(‘streaming’)){
setState.apply(this, [“play”]);
}
break;
case “buffer”:

break;
default:
send_play_metric();
playerInstance.play();

if(!$bucket.hasClass(‘streaming’)){
setState.apply(this, [“play”]);
}
}
});
});

How Ebola Was Discovered

Two Stations Bridge Cultural Gaps With Bilingual Reporting

Aug 29, 2014   //   by Administrator   //   World News  //  Comments Off on Two Stations Bridge Cultural Gaps With Bilingual Reporting

Bilingual reportingi
i

Bilingual reporting

In Central Washington, two public radio stations, Northwest Public Radio (NWPR) and KDNA, have started a new initiative to bridge the cultural and linguistic gaps between communities. The motivation is straightforward: public radio station NWPR has partnered with Spanish-language radio station KDNA to create and share content for broadcast. Combining reporting and digital services teams between stations, this partnership is tackling the issues of their respective communities, bilingually.

John Paxson, the news director for NWPR, describes the project as “a new kind of journalism that involves two radio stations and two bilingual reporters that will effortlessly transition between languages and communities to bring attention to local news in the communities they serve.” The Washington-based stations anticipate this project will give public radio listeners and policymakers alike the opportunity to cross-culturally understand issues that affect all communities across the state. As our nation continues to expand with non-English speaking populations, bilingual reporting is becoming more important to reach these new audiences. By adding diverse perspectives in dialogue, the local reporting initiative will help to build community and celebrate identity among public radio audiences.

The bilingual reporting project began last year with a generous grant from the Knight Foundation followed by a matching grant from the Yakima Valley Community Foundation. The two foundations set out to bring community issues into focus through public broadcasting.

Michael Morales, Director of Community Engagement for the Yakima Valley Community Foundation, hopes the new initiative will “improve overall civic engagement and community awareness between monolingual Spanish and English speakers in the region.” At the center of the project is strengthening connections and forging new ones, as these interest groups utilize traditional media reporting to provide a bilingual perspective to issues of local and national significance. In an effort to share stories across intergenerational communities, the partnership will also develop a mobile-ready application to make the bilingual reporting digitally accessible.

Reporter Rowan Gerety will be providing bilingual coverage for both stations.

Reporter Rowan Gerety will be providing bilingual coverage for both stations.

Picasa/NPR


hide caption

itoggle caption

Picasa/NPR

KDNA is the only full-time educational Spanish language radio station that focuses its efforts on minority communities in the agricultural community of the Yakima Valley. NWPR is a multi-station network serving Washington and portions of Oregon, Idaho and British Columbia. Primarily broadcasting NPR news and classical programming in English, NWPR’s extensive signal coverage can be heard by more than 3.6 million residents in the region.

With the diversity of their audiences, Morales points out how both stations will benefit: “the lack of resources should not prevent the Spanish speaking communities from benefiting from traditional media reporting on issues of contention to their community. On the other hand, NWPR lacks the capacity to engage and develop stories within the Latino community that are important for all audiences to benefit from.” A previous void of opportunity has prevented non-English speaking communities from accessing information critical to their daily lives presented by media reporting in English. This project is significant for the fact that it presents both digital and traditional broadcast platforms for all audiences to access local news programming in their language of choice.

The bilingual reporting project between KDNA and NWPR was established to create a strong multilingual voice that both empowers and engages communities in Washington through local news coverage. At the cornerstone of the reporting project is the need to protect and honor all forms of cultural diversity. In a society where residents of the same state can be so drastically separated by communal identity, the bilingual reporting project will help to tighten gaps in understanding what we do not know about languages and cultures different from our own.

Pages:1234567...13»

Categories

Current Times

  • NPT: 2017-11-25 09:17 AM
  • EST: 2017-11-24 10:32 PM
  • PST: 2017-11-24 07:32 PM